Movie Stars Who Have Never Won an Oscar: Part 9 – Burgess Meredith to Tyrone Power

We mostly remember Boris Karloff for his portrayal of Frankenstein during the 1930s. Yet, his distinctive build made him well suited for a career in horror movies. However, despite playing monsters, he was a sweet man who liked children.

We mostly remember Boris Karloff for his portrayal of Frankenstein during the 1930s. Yet, his distinctive build made him well suited for a career in horror movies. However, despite playing monsters, he was a sweet man who liked children.

While it has produced classics and legends in its own right, the horror genre rarely gains any prestige and respect its counterparts receive. Of course, this might have to do with how many horror movies become classics after they’ve been around for awhile and they may not always be that scary by then. Not to mention, many horror movies tend to have value for their flaws or humorous scenes like The Invisible Man or the monk scene from Bride of Frankenstein that was soon parodied by Mel Brooks. In this selection, you’ll see an assortment of 10 more Hollywood and international stars that you may or may not have seen. First, we have swash buckling legend and Sherlock Holmes portrayer Basil Rathbone followed by legendary leading man Tyrone Power who usually beat him on screen since Rathbone was usually the bad guy. Second, we have Paulette Goddard who’s best known for her involvement with Charlie Chaplin as well as her former husband and Rocky’s trainer Burgess Meredith. Then come Robert Ryan and Anthony Perkins, who were both handsome guys identified with playing villains. Of course, we always tend to identify Perkins as Norman Bates. After that is John Garfield who was once a promising leading man before becoming a casualty of McCarthyism. Next is British New Wave and Manchurian Candidate assassin Laurence Harvey followed by horror movie legend Boris Karloff. Finally, we conclude with a man who’ve baby boomers identify as Maverick and millennials have remembered as Old Ryan Gosling from The Notebook, James Garner. So without further adieu, here are 10 more screen legend who never got to see a competitive  Academy Award in their careers.

81. Burgess Meredith

Though best identified with the Rocky movies by later generations, Burgess Meredith's career roles consisted of a lot more than just Rocky's trainer or the Penguin as far as my mom's concerned. He was also married to Paulette Goddard by the way.

Though best identified with the Rocky movies by later generations, Burgess Meredith’s career roles consisted of a lot more than just Rocky’s trainer or the Penguin as far as my mom’s concerned. He was also married to Paulette Goddard by the way.

Personal Life: (1907-1997) Born in Cleveland, Ohio. Father was a Canadian-born physician. Attended Amherst College and served in the Army Air Forces during WWII where he rose to the rank of Captain. Theater debut in 1929. Made his first movie in 1939. Married 4 times with Paulette Goddard as his 3rd wife. Married for 46 years to his 4th wife Kaja Sundsten and had 2 children with her. Died from complications from Alzheimer’s and melanoma at 89.
Famous for: American actor whose career spanned for over 60 years. Called “a virtuosic actor” and “one of the most accomplished actors of the century.” Notable roles are George Milton from Of Mice and Men, Sebastian from That Uncertain Feeling, Ernie Pyle from Story of G. I. Joe, Quillary from Idiot’s Delight, Herbert Gelman from Advise & Consent, Doc Scully from A Big Hand for the Little Lady, the Storekeeper from MacKenna’s Gold, Harry Greener from The Day of the Locust, Mickey from Rocky, Charles Chazen from The Sentinel, and Ammon from Clash of the Titans.
Nominated for: Meredith was nominated twice for Best Supporting Actor in 1975 for The Day of the Locust and 1976 for Rocky.
Most Crushing Loss: Not receiving an honorary Oscar he so richly deserved.
Reasons: Probably the fact he’s been best known as Rocky’s trainer and the Penguin might’ve had something to do with not winning the Oscar. Also was better known in the theater scene.
Trivia: Played the Penguin on Batman during the 1960s. Adam West spoke at his funeral. Lifetime member of the Actors Studio. Won several Emmys.

82. Paulette Goddard

Though Paulette Goddard was a highly accomplished actress in her own right who was nominated for an Academy Award, she's mostly identified with her 2 movies and real life relationship with Charlie Chaplin (even though it's unclear whether the two were even married).

Though Paulette Goddard was a highly accomplished actress in her own right who was nominated for an Academy Award, she’s mostly identified with her 2 movies and real life relationship with Charlie Chaplin (even though it’s unclear whether the two were even married).

Personal Life: (1910-1990) Born Pauline Goddard Levy in New York City (a lot of the details on her life is disputed due to her family dysfunction). Father was son of a Jewish cigar manufacturer. Parents separated when she was very young and divorced in 1926. Father either left the family or mother absconded with her. Yet, in either case she and her mother moved often during her childhood to avoid a custody battle (very possible in those days). Worked at Saks Fifth Avenue and Hattie Carnegie as a child model. Introduced to Florenz Ziegfeld by her great-uncle and made her stage debut in 1926 as a Ziegfeld Follie where she first used her stage name. Made her first film in 1929. Married 3 or 4 times (depending on whether you count Chaplin as her second husband) with second/third marriage to Burgess Meredith and third/fourth marriage to author Eric Maria Remarque. Moved to Switzerland during her marriage to Remarque. Retired in 1972. Was successfully treated for breast cancer in her later years. Died of heart failure and emphysema in Switzerland at 79.
Famous for: American actress and major star at Paramount during the 1940s. Started in Hollywood as an extra and rose through the ranks. Notable roles are Ellen Peterson – A Gamine from Modern Times, Leslie Saunders from The Young at Heart, Nana from Dramatic School, Mimi Aarons from The Women, Hannah from The Great Dictator, Molly McCorkle from Pot o’ Gold, Anita Dixon from Hold Back the Dawn, Loxi Claiborne from Reap the Wild Wind, Lt. Joan O’Doul from So Proudly We Hail!, Kitty, Celestine from The Diary of a Chambermaid, Abigail “Abby” Martha Hale from Unconquered, Mrs. Laura Cheveley from An Ideal Husband, Anna Lucasta, Jezebel from Sins of Jezebel, Angie from A Stranger Came Home, and Mariagrazia from Time of Indifference.
Nominated for: Goddard was nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1943 for So Proudly We Hail!
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actress in 1945 for Kitty.
Reasons: No matter how talented Goddard was in her own right, she’s mostly known today for her relationship with Charlie Chaplin and is usually considered his third wife, despite that there was no record of them ever being married (but they did live together). And in the 1940s and 1950s, Chaplin was starting to come under intense scrutiny for his left wing political views from the US government. Also, she got into an ugly legal battle with her father.
Trivia: Since her parents’ separation as a young child, she would never see her father again until she became famous in the 1930s (but unlike John Lennon’s situation, this didn’t end happily with her father suing for libel, defamation, and support. She was forced to pay her dad $35 a week. She also claimed he wasn’t her biological father). Would live in the same neighborhood with Charlie Chaplin in her later years. Was considered for the role of Scarlett O’Hara. Was friends with Andy Warhol. In the 1980s, she was a socialite who appeared covered in jewels at many high cultural functions with several well-known men. Contributed millions to New York University despite having a high school education. Formed Monterey Pictures with John Steinbeck in 1949.

83. Basil Rathbone

Basil Rathbone was a highly accomplished fencer yet he usually lost his onscreen sword battles mostly because he was cast as an evil aristocrat. Yet, off-screen, he'd clean the clock of just anyone in Hollywood.

Basil Rathbone was a highly accomplished fencer yet he usually lost his onscreen sword battles mostly because he was cast as an evil aristocrat. Yet, off-screen, he’d clean the clock of just anyone in Hollywood. Was distantly related to a man who witness the Lincoln assassination.

Personal Life: (1892-1967) Born in Johannesburg, South Africa to English parents. Mother was a violinist while father was a mining engineer. Family fled to the UK when he was 3 years old because his father was accused by the Boers for being a spy after the Jameson Raid during the Boer Wars. Worked for Liverpool and Globe Insurance Companies. Stage debut in 1911. Served in the London Scottish Regiment during WWI as an intelligence officer and rose to the rank of captain. Film career began in 1925. Married twice and had 2 children including a son to his first wife Marion Foreman and an adopted daughter to second wife Ouida Bergere. Married to second wife Ouida Bergere for 45 years who was also his manager. Died of a heart attack in New York City at 75.
Famous for: South African-born British actor who rose to prominence in the UK as a Shakespearean stage actor and went on to appear in over 70 films, primarily swashbucklers and costume dramas. Frequently played suave villains or morally ambiguous characters. Admired for his athletic cinema swordsmanship even though he usually had to lose most of his onscreen duels, especially to Errol Flynn. Notable roles are Karenin from Anna Karenina, Pontius Pilate from The Last Days of Pompeii, Levasseur from Captain Blood, Marquis St. Evremonde from A Tale of Two Cities, Tybalt from Romeo and Juliet, Count Ferdinand Anteoni from The Garden of Allah, Sir Guy of Gisbourne from The Adventures of Robin Hood, Baron Wolf von Frankenstein from Son of Frankenstein, Sherlock Holmes from the Sherlock Holmes series, Captain Esteban Pasquale from The Mark of Zorro, King Louis XI from If I Were King, Sir Ravenhurst from The Court Jester, and John F. Black, Esq. from The Comedy of Terrors.
Nominated for: Rathbone was nominated twice for Best Supporting Actor in 1937 for Romeo and Juliet and in 1939 for If I Were King.
Most Crushing Loss: Not receiving an honorary Oscar for his long career of having to lose all those swordfights to Errol Flynn and if not, then Tyrone Power.
Reasons: Rathbone normally played bad guys in swashbucklers and sometimes horror films. Also got typecast as Sherlock Holmes. Oscar wise he was more or less burned by the competition, especially against Joseph Schildkraut who very closely resembled the real Captain Alfred Dreyfus and that The Life of Emile Zola is still an excellent film.
Trivia: Distant cousin of Major Henry Rathbone who witnessed the Lincoln assassination at Ford’s Theater as well as seriously wounded while trying to stop John Wilkes Booth. Awarded the Military Cross for his day time scouting actions and conduct under the especially dangerous raids. Said his favorite role was that of Romeo and would rather have been remembered for his stage career. He and Ouida used to hold extravagant parties at their house. Listed fencing as one of his favorite recreations. Had a cousin who was a British MP. Won a Tony for Best Actor in a Play in 1948.

84. Robert Ryan

Despite his good looks, Robert Ryan is mostly identified with playing hardened cops and ruthless villains in his movies. Still, when you look at his performances it's a wonder he's not remembered more than some of his peers.

Despite his good looks, Robert Ryan is mostly identified with playing hardened cops and ruthless villains in his movies. Still, when you look at his performances it’s a wonder he’s not remembered more than some of his peers.

Personal Life: (1909-1973) Born in Chicago, Illinois. Graduated from Dartmouth College in 1932 after winning the school’s heavyweight championship 4 years in a row. Worked as a ship stoker, a WPA worker, and a Montana ranch hand. Wanted to be a playwright but was forced into acting to support himself. Studied acting in Hollywood and began his stage and film career in the early 1940s. Enlisted in the Marine Corps during WWII and served as a drill instructor. Married to Jessica Cadawalader for 33 years and had 2 sons. Died of lung cancer in New York City at 63.
Famous for: American actor who often played hardened cops and ruthless villains. Notable roles are Montgomery from Crossfire, Jim Wilson from On Dangerous Ground, Stoker from The Set-Up, Ben Vandergroat from The Naked Spur, Sandy Dawson from The House of Bamboo, Reno Smith from Bad Day at Black Rock, Earle Slater from Once Again Tomorrow, Col. Everett Dasher Breed from The Dirty Dozen, Deke Thornton from The Wild Bunch, and Larry Slade from The Iceman Cometh.
Nominated for: Ryan was nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1947 for Crossfire.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1955 for Bad Day at Black Rock. As a villain, this is Ryan playing perhaps one of his most despicable characters who covers up a very ugly hate crime in this small Western town.
Reasons: Contrary to some of his roles, Ryan was a pacifist who opposed McCarthyism and fought against racial discrimination during the Civil Rights Movement. He was also against nuclear weapons. His wife was a Quaker who held similar views. Not to mention, the Hollywood establishment wasn’t too keen on awarding Oscars to guys known for playing incredibly realistic and ruthless villains like Ryan had.
Trivia: Took up painting as a hobby. Sublet an apartment for John Lennon and Yoko Ono. Helped open a progressive school for his kids in his backyard called Oakwood.

85. Anthony Perkins

Though Anthony Perkins was groomed as a potential romantic lead in his early films, he's best remembered for playing the psyhcotic Norman Bates in Psycho. His private life was marked by struggles with his sexual identity.

Though Anthony Perkins was groomed as a potential romantic lead in his early films, he’s best remembered for playing the psyhcotic Norman Bates in Psycho. His private life was marked by struggles with his sexual identity.

Personal Life: (1932-1992) Born in New York City. Son of actor Osgood Perkins who died when he was 5. Attended Columbia University and Rollins College. Made his film debut in 1953. Married photographer Berinthia “Berry” Berenson and had 2 sons. Died of AIDS related pneumonia at 60.
Famous for: American actor and singer. Best known for playing Norman Bates in Psycho. Notable roles are Fred Whitmarsh from The Actress, Josh Birdwell from Friendly Persuasion, Cornelius Hackl from The Matchmaker, Abel from Green Mansions, Lt. Peter Holmes from On the Beach, Philip Van der Besh from Goodbye Again, Joseph K from The Trial, Sgt. Warren from Is Paris Burning?, Chaplain Capt. A.T. Tappman from Catch-22, Reverend LaSalle from The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean, and McQueen from Murder on the Orient Express.
Nominated for: Perkins was nominated once for Best Supporting Actor in 1956 for Friendly Persuasion.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actor in 1960 for Psycho. Seriously, Norman Bates is perhaps one of the scariest villains in movie history and should’ve at least gotten that.
Reasons: It was well-known in Hollywood that Perkins may have been at least bisexual (if not, then gay) and was linked to having relationships with Tab Hunter, Rudolf Nureyev, and Stephen Sondheim. He went through gay conversion therapy to overcome this (but was never really successful). He also died of AIDS in the 1990s which was leaked through The National Enquirer. Not to mention, suffered from typecasting after Psycho.
Trivia: Descendent of Mayflower passenger John Howland. Paternal great grandson of wood engraver Andrew Varick Stout Anthony. Lifetime member of The Actors Studio. Recorded 3 pop music albums. Co-wrote The Last of Sheila with Stephen Sondheim. Hosted Saturday Night Live in 1976. Wife died on 9/11.

86. Laurence Harvey

Laurence Harvey is best known for his role as a brainwashed mommy's little assassin in The Manchurian Candidate, his career would decline in the 1960s due to his terrible personality.

Laurence Harvey is best known for his role as a brainwashed mommy’s little assassin in The Manchurian Candidate, his career would decline in the 1960s due to his terrible personality.

Personal Life: (1928-1973) Born Zvi Mosheh Skikne in Joniškis, Lithuania to a Jewish family. At 5, family immigrated to South Africa and he grew up in Johannesburg as Harry Skikne. Served in an entertainment unit in his teens during WWII for the South African Army. Moved to London after the war and attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and changed his name to “Laurence Harvey” when he started performing on stage. Made film debut in 1948. Married 3 times and had a daughter to third wife Paulene Stone. Was a heavy smoker and drinker. Died of stomach cancer at 45.
Famous for: Lithuanian, South African, and British actor whose career spanned a quarter century. Most famous for playing social climbers in movies from the 1960s. Notable roles are Christopher Isherwood from I Am a Camera, Sir Humphrey Tavistock from The Truth About Women, Joe Lampton from Room at the Top, William Barret Travis from The Alamo, Weston Ligget Butterfield 8, Raymond Shaw from The Manchurian Candidate, John Buchanan, Jr. from Summer and Smoke, Phillip Carey from Of Human Bondage, Miles Brand from Darling, Hamlet from The Magic Christian, and Jason Henry from Welcome to Arrow Beach.
Nominated for: Harvey was nominated for Best Actor in 1959 for Room at the Top.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actor in 1962 for The Manchurian Candidate. Seriously, it’s not easy to play a man who’s being brainwashed into a Communist assassin by Angela Lansbury.
Reasons: Well, despite being married 3 times and having a few affairs, he was rumored to being bisexual and might’ve had a long term non-platonic relationship with his agent. Frank Sinatra’s valet said he made passes at him and Sinatra was alleged to call him, “Ladyboy.” Not to mention, he’d often clash with his co-workers and terrible public comments to the press, which might’ve been a bigger reason. Also was mostly seen as a British actor and his career went downhill in the last decade of his life as well as died young.
Trivia: Daughter was a model and bounty hunter. Friends with Frank Sinatra.

87. James Garner

Though known for his good looks and disarming charm on TV and film, James Garner had a rather difficult childhood to overcome before he achieved his big break as the loveable anti-hero Maverick.

Though known for his good looks and disarming charm on TV and film, James Garner had a rather difficult childhood to overcome before he achieved his big break as the loveable anti-hero Maverick.

Personal Life: (1928-2014) Born James Scott Bumgarner in Norman, Oklahoma. At 5, his mother died and he was sent to live with relatives until his father remarried. Yet, his stepmother was physically abusive but luckily she left when he was 14. After that, his family moved to Los Angeles. At 16, he became a Merchant Marine near the end of WWII but suffered from chronic seasickness. Became a swimsuit model at 17 for Jantzen. Was a high school dropout. Spent 7 months in the National Guard and served as regular Army in Korea for 14. Was wounded by shrapnel in the face and hand as well as shot in the ass from friendly fire. Acting career began in 1954 on Broadway and made his first film in 1956. Would later drop the “Bum” from his name legally. Married to Lois Josephine Fleischman Clarke for 57 years (though they were separated for 2 years but reconciled) and had 2 daughters (one being an adopted stepdaughter). Had chronic knee problems during the 1970s. Had quintuple bypass surgery in 1988. Suffered a stroke in 2008. Died of a myocardial infraction at 86.
Famous for: American actor, voice artist, and comedian. Had a career of more than 5 decades starring in Maverick and The Rockford Files as well as acted in 50 films. Notable roles are Capt. Mike Bailey, USMC from Sayonara, Dr. Joe Cardin from The Children’s Hour, Hendley “The Scrounger” from The Great Escape, Dr. Gerald Boyer from The Thrill of It All, Lt. Cmdr. Charles Edward Madison from The Americanization of Emily, Nick Arden from Move Over, Darling, Casey Barnett from The Art of Love, Jess Remsberg from Duel at Diablo, Pete Aron from Grand Prix, Wyatt Earp from Hour of the Gun, Jason McCullough Support Your Local Sheriff, King Marchand from Victor Victoria, President Matt Douglas from My Fellow Americans, Tank Sullivan from Space Cowboys, Murphy Jones from Murphy’s Romance, and Old Noah Calhoun “Duke” from The Notebook.
Nominated for: Garner was nominated for Best Actor in 1985 for Muphy’s Romance.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actor in 1964 for The Americanization of Emily.
Reasons: Mostly because Garner usually acted in comedies and westerns which really weren’t considered in the realm of serious acting. Not to mention, television was considered a lower form of art until relatively recent times.
Trivia: Was part Cherokee descent. Played Bret Maverick in Maverick and Jim Rockford from The Rockford Files. Received two Purple Hearts. Married his wife after knowing her for 2 weeks (but at least it worked out, mostly). Owned an auto racing team between 1967 and 1969. Was an avid golfer. Joined Martin Luther King Jr. in “The March on Washington” and sat in the third row during King’s “I Have a Dream” speech. Was a big Oakland Raiders fan.

88. John Garfield

John Garfield was once a promising young actor known to play brooding, rebellious, working class characters. Yet, he made the unfortunate mistake of marrying a former Communist that resulted in him being blacklisted during McCarthyism, which cost his career.

John Garfield was once a promising young actor known to play brooding, rebellious, working class characters. Yet, he made the unfortunate mistake of marrying a former Communist that resulted in him being blacklisted during McCarthyism, which cost his career.

Personal Life: (1913-1952) Born Jacob Julius Garfinkle in Manhattan’s Lower East Side in New York City. Parents were Jewish Russian immigrants. Father was a clothes presser and part-time cantor. At 7, his mother died 2 years after experiencing a difficult pregnancy with his younger brother, Max. After that, he and his brother were sent to live with various relatives, all poor until his father remarried. In the Bronx he joined a series of gangs and soon became a gang leader. Was introduced to acting after being sent to a school for difficult children and took speech therapy to overcome his stammer. Studied acting at the American Laboratory Theater and would later to the New York Theater and the Group Theater while he began his Broadway career in 1932. Moved to Hollywood in 1937 and signed with Warner Bros. as John Garfield. Tried to enlist in the armed forces during WWII but was turned down for a heart condition. Married childhood sweetheart Roberta Seidman and had 3 children. Was in the process of divorcing her when he died. Died of coronary thrombosis in New York at 39 and was found in a showgirl’s apartment.
Famous for: American actor adept at playing brooding, rebellious, working-class characters. Acknowledged as the predecessor for the Method actors such as Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift, and James Dean. Notable roles are Mickey Borden from Four Daughters, Johnnie from They Made Me a Criminal, Porfirio Diaz from Juarez, Gabriel Lopez Daughters Courageous, Rims Rosson from Saturday’s Children, Joseph Enrico ‘Joe’ Lorenzo from East of the River, Danny from Tortilla Flat, Wolf from Destination Tokyo, Al Schmid from Pride of the Marines, Frank Chambers from The Postman Always Rings Twice, Paul Boray from Humoresque, Charley Davis from Body and Soul, Dave Goldman from Gentlemen’s Agreement, and Harry Morgan from The Breaking Point.
Nominated for: Garfield was nominated twice, once for Best Supporting Actor and once for Best Actor in 1938 for Four Daughters and in 1947 for Body and Soul.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actor in 1946 for The Postman Always Rings Twice.
Reasons: Well, Garfield was a longtime liberal married to a former Communist which got him in a lot of trouble after WWII with the Red Scare. Though he denied Communist affiliation during his testimony at the House Committee on Un-American Activities, his refusal to name names effectively ended his career (and the stress from it all might’ve actually killed him). He’s one of the most famous blacklisted Hollywood actors.
Trivia: He and Bette Davis were driving forces behind opening the Hollywood Canteen for American servicemen during WWII and traveled overseas to entertain the troops. Funeral was largest in New York since Rudolph Valentino’s.

89. Boris Karloff

Though Boris Karloff is best known for his career in horror movies, particularly playing villains, he also did a lot of audio recordings particularly with children's stories and horror anthologies respectively.

Though Boris Karloff is best known for his career in horror movies, particularly playing villains, he also did a lot of audio recordings particularly with children’s stories and horror anthologies respectively.

Personal Life: (1887-1969) Born William Henry Pratt in London, England but grew up in Enfield. Father worked for the Indian Salt Revenue Service but abandoned the family and died when he was a baby. Lost his mother as a child as well and was raised by his older siblings. Was bow legged, had a lisp, and stuttered as a young boy (yet well he conquered the stutter, he didn’t overcome the lisp, which was noticeable all throughout his career. But he still had a very nice voice.). Attended London’s King’s College but dropped out. Worked as a farm laborer and did various odd jobs before getting into acting. In 1909, he traveled to Canada and changed his professional name to “Boris Karloff” which he might’ve done to conceal himself as the “black sheep” of the family for going into show biz (yet his family was incredibly supportive). Also worked as railway package handler for a time. Because of his manual labor jobs, he suffered back problems for the rest of his life and didn’t fight in WWI. Made his first Hollywood film in 1919. Never became a naturalized citizen or legally changed his name. Married 5 times and had a daughter to fourth wife Dorothy Stine. Married to Evelyn Hope Helmore for 23 years. Battled emphysema and arthritis for years. Died of pneumonia at his Bramshott, England cottage at 81.
Famous for: British actor best remembered for his roles in horror films especially as Frankenstein’s monster, resulting in immense popularity and international fame. Notable roles are the Monster from the first 3 Frankenstein films, Gaffney from Scarface, Dr. Fu Manchu from The Mask of Fu Manchu, Imhotep/Ardath Bey from The Mummy, Count Ledrantz from The House of Rothschild, Hjalmar Poelzig from The Black Cat, Edmond Bateman from The Raven, Mord the Executioner from Tower of London, Dr. Gustav Niemann from House of Frankenstein, Dr. Hugo Hollingshead from The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, John Gray from The Body Snatcher, and Byron Orlok from Targets.
Nominated for: Karloff was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not receiving an honorary Oscar for his acting career. Seriously, he really deserved it.
Reasons: Horror movie actors no matter how great never get prestigious acting prizes in Hollywood. Even if they are Boris Karloff.
Trivia: Was part East Indian on his father’s side as well as was the great nephew of Anna Leonowens (whose tales about life in the royal court of Siam [now Thailand] were the basis of the musical The King and I). Did voice work for Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas cartoon and won a Grammy for the album. Brother was a distinguished diplomat. Witnessed a devastating tornado in Saskatchewan in 1912 and assisted with cleanup efforts. Did a lot of spoken word recordings for children’s books and horror anthologies. Despite his roles, he was a very kind gentleman who gave generously, especially to children’s charities. Would dress up as Father Christmas to hand out presents for disabled children in a Baltimore hospital every Christmas. Charter member of the Screen Actors Guild and was outspoken on the conditions actors had to deal with. Rushed to the hospital in full makeup during the filming of Son of Frankenstein when his daughter was born. Appeared on Broadway as Jonathan Brewster in Arsenic and Old Lace, which was a tailor made role for him (as a self-referential joke). His portrayal as Frankenstein’s monster was the artistic inspiration for the Incredible Hulk. Shared a birthday with his daughter.

90. Tyrone Power

Born in a showbiz family that spanned generations, Tyrone Power appeared in dozens of films in the 1930s to the 1950s as a matinee idol appearing from romance and swashbuckling movies like The Mark of Zorro to serious drama like The Razor's Edge. He also served in the Marines in WWII. Tragically, he died of a heart attack at 44.

Born in a showbiz family that spanned generations, Tyrone Power appeared in dozens of films in the 1930s to the 1950s as a matinee idol appearing from romance and swashbuckling movies like The Mark of Zorro to serious drama like The Razor’s Edge. He also served in the Marines in WWII. Tragically, he died of a heart attack at 44.

Personal Life: (1914-1958) Born in Cincinnati, Ohio. Father was the English stage and screen actor Tyrone Power Sr. often known as Fred. Came from a long theatrical line dating from his great-grandfather who lived in the first half of the 19th century, an actor and comedian also named Tyrone Power (You can see how it gets confusing). Mother was also an actress as well as a drama and voice coach. She also gave her son acting and singing lessons in her spare time. Family moved to California while he was a small child on a doctor’s advice it would improve his health. At 6, his parents divorced. At 14, he appeared with his mother in his first stage play in San Gabriel. At 16, his family moved back to Cincinnati where they lived with his great aunt who founded a drama school. After graduating high school, he joined his father in 1931 who died in his arms that December. Decided to pursue an acting career from then on. After a time in community theater and New York, he moved to Hollywood in 1936. During WWII in 1942, he enlisted in the Marine Corps as a pilot. Married 3 times and had 3 children consisting of 2 daughters with second wife Linda Christian and a posthumous son with third wife Deborah Minardos (whose name was, yes Tyrone Power as well). Also known to have many extramarital affairs. Died of a heart attack in Spain at 44.
Famous for: American actor who appeared in dozens of films in the 1930s and 1940s, often in swashbucklers and romantic leads. Though largely a matinee idol known for his good looks, from drama to light comedy, sometimes as a romantic lead. Yet, in the 1950s, he began to set limits on the amount of films he made to have time for stage work. Notable roles are Count Axel de Fersen from Marie Antoinette, Ferdinand de Lesseps from Suez, Jesse James, Barton Dewitt Clinton from Rose of Washington Square, Don Diego Vega / Zorro from The Mark of Zorro, Roger “Alexander” Grant from Alexander’s Ragtime Band, Juan Gallardo from Blood and Sand, Jamie Waring from The Black Swan, Larry Darrell from The Razor’s Edge, Stanton Carlisle from Nightmare Alley, Andrea Orsini from Prince of Foxes, Jacob “Jake” Barnes from The Sun Also Rises, and Leonard Vole from Witness to the Prosecution.
Nominated for: Power was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actor in 1946 for The Razor’s Edge, which he plays a shell-shocked vet who seeks relief through traveling the world. Also not being nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1957 for Witness to the Prosecution.
Reasons: Well, while Power was a box office draw he was more of what we’d call an action star since he mostly starred in swashbucklers and sometimes romances. He wasn’t really taken seriously as an actor for a very long time in his career.
Trivia: Flew missions carrying cargo and wounded marines during the Battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa. Received American Campaign Medal, the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, two Bronze Stars, and the WWII Victory Medal. Was promoted to captain in the reserves in 1951. Was very respected among the men he served with during WWII and after. Played the title role of Mister Roberts on Broadway. Said to have affairs with Judy Garland and Lana Turner. One of the top 100 box office moneymakers of all time. Interred at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery with a military service in which Sir Laurence Olivier recited a poem called “High Flight.”

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