Movie Stars Who Have Never Won an Oscar: Part 20 – Margaret Hamilton to Madeleine Carroll

Though taller than some of her leading men, Cyd Charisse was a staple of movie musicals throughout the 1940s and 1950s as well as appeared alongside Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire.

Though taller than some of her leading men, Cyd Charisse was a staple of movie musicals throughout the 1940s and 1950s as well as appeared alongside Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire.

Since my last 10 movie stars are all women, I open this final installment with a note about actresses. Now while actresses in Hollywood have always had less opportunity than men, ladies in the Golden Age of Hollywood didn’t have much better, especially with the morality clauses. Of course, a lot of actresses I’ve known during that period were in only a few known films and had less roles in movies I’ve never heard of as they aged. Yet, some who weren’t cast for their youth and beauty tended to be confined to character and supporting roles. So it’s no surprise that I didn’t compile as many. Yet, in this final edition here are 10 more. First, we have Margaret Hamilton famous for playing the Wicked Witch of the West but was actually a rather nice lady followed by Mildred Dunnock a schoolteacher who later played Mrs. Loman in Death of a Salesman. Second, there are versatile actresses Geraldine Fitzgerald and Ann Southern who’ve both had long careers as well as Nina Foch who played the Pharaoh’s daughter in The Ten Commandments (the one who found Moses).  After them comes Dame Flora Robson though not pretty played roles ranging from maids, queens, and serial killers on stage and screen followed by Una O’Connor who mostly played maids. Then there’s wholesome cute girl Jean Crain whom studios wanted to play teenagers for years. Next is Cyd Charisse best known for her long marriage to Tony Martin as well as her roles in movie musicals during the 1940s and 1950s. And last but not least is the first icy Hitchcock blonde herself, Madeleine Carroll. So without further adieu, here are 10 Oscar less actresses for your reading pleasure in this final edition I bring to you.

191. Margaret Hamilton

Wicked Witch of the West: [to Dorothy] "And as for you, my fine lady, it's true I can't attend to you here and now as I'd like; but just try to stay out of my way – just try! I'll get you, my pretty, and your little dog too!" Though Margaret Hamilton would traumatize generations of children as the Wicked Witch of the West, she was a sweet woman who frequently gave to charitable organizations, spoke for pet welfare, and dearly loved children.

Wicked Witch of the West: [to Dorothy] “And as for you, my fine lady, it’s true I can’t attend to you here and now as I’d like; but just try to stay out of my way – just try! I’ll get you, my pretty, and your little dog too!”
Though Margaret Hamilton would traumatize generations of children as the Wicked Witch of the West, she was a sweet woman who frequently gave to charitable organizations, spoke for pet welfare and public education, and dearly loved children.

Personal Life: (1902-1985) Born in Cleveland, Ohio. Attended Wheelock College in Boston where she became a teacher. Made her stage debut in 1923. Made her first film in 1933. Married to Paul Meserve for 7 years and had a son she raised on her own. Retired in 1982. Died of a heart attack in Salisbury, Connecticut at 82.
Famous for: American character actress best known as the Wicked Witch of the West from The Wizard of Oz. Career spanned for nearly 50 years and usually playing spinsters, particularly of the New England variety. Notable roles are Madame Du Barry from Hat, Coat, and Glove, Lucy Gurget from The Farmer Takes a Wife, Martha Perkins from Way Down East, Agatha from These Three, Drugstore Lady from Nothing Sacred, Mrs. Harper from The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Miss Gulch / The Wicked Witch of the West from The Wizard of Oz, Martha Steele from Babes in Arms, Mrs. Gideon from My Little Chickadee, Mrs. Jackson from The Invisible Woman, Norah from Twin Beds, Mrs. Larch from The Ox-Bow Incident, Myrtle Ferguson from Johnny Come Lately, Norah from State of the Union, Teacher from The Red Pony, Mrs. Theresa Appleby from Bungalow 13, Elaine Zacharides from 13 Ghosts, Mrs. Nicholson from Paradise Alley, Miss Kaller from The Anderson Tapes, Daphne Heap from Brewster McCloud, and Mae from Rosie!.
Nominated for: Hamilton was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1939 for The Wizard of Oz. Man, she was one mean and green witch.
Reasons: Trust me, you don’t want to give a statuette to a woman best known for playing a notorious villain known to traumatize kids for generations. It’s kind of a shame since she was a very nice person who cared deeply about children and frequently gave to charitable organizations. And it didn’t help that many children believed she was mean in real life.
Trivia: During the 1930s, she never put herself under contract to any one studio and priced her services at $1,000 a week to support herself and her son. Garland visited her and looked after her son while she was recovering in the hospital after she suffered burns during her exit from Munchkinland filming. When she returned, she said, “I won’t sue, because I know how this business works, and I would never work again. I will return to work on one condition — no more fireworks!” A stand-in for her wasn’t so lucky. Son commented that she enjoyed saying, “I’ll get you, my pretty, and your little dog, too!”-that she sometimes used it in real life. Took roles in whatever medium she could get if she was free. Though she reprised her famous role on Sesame Street, her appearance hasn’t been aired since 1976 as a result of complaints from parents of terrified children. Yet, she also appeared on Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood where she explained that she wasn’t a bad witch. Appeared in PSAs for organizations promoting the welfare of pets. Was lifelong friends with Ray Bolger. Served on the Beverly Hills Board of Education between 1948 to 1951, and was a Sunday school teacher during the 1950s.Said The Wizard of Oz was her favorite book since she was 4.

192. Mildred Dunnock

A school teacher who didn't start acting until her 30s, Mildred Dunnock was known to play sweet motherly figures such as Linda Loman from Death of a Salesman. Yet, she's the one in the wheelchair Richard Widmark pushes down the stairs in Kiss of Death.

A school teacher who didn’t start acting until her 30s, Mildred Dunnock was known to play sweet motherly figures such as Linda Loman from Death of a Salesman. Yet, she’s the one in the wheelchair Richard Widmark pushes down the stairs in Kiss of Death.

Personal Life: (1901-1991) Born in Baltimore, Maryland. Attended Goucher College. Was a school teacher who didn’t start acting until her early 30s. Made her first film in 1944. Married to Keith Urmy for 58 years and had 2 children. Retired in 1987. Died of natural causes at Oak Bluffs, Massachusetts at 90.
Famous for: American character actress whose career spanned 57 years. Notable roles are Miss Ronberry from The Corn is Green, Mrs. Rizzo from Kiss of Death, Linda Loman from Death of a Salesman, Señora Espejo from Viva Zapata!, Mrs. Ruth Golding from The Jazz Singer, Martha Reno from Love Me Tender, Mrs. Wiggs from The Trouble with Harry, Aunt Rose Comfort from Baby Doll, Miss Elsie Thornton from Peyton Place, Sister Margharita (Mistress of Postulants) from The Nun’s Story, Mrs. Wandrous from Butterfield 8, Pilar from Behold a Pale Horse, Mrs. Sherman from The Spiral Staircase, and Nellie from The Pick-Up Artist.
Nominated for: Dunnock was nominated twice for Best Supporting Actress in 1951 for Death of a Salesman and 1956 for Baby Doll.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1947 for Kiss of Death. I mean she should get something after what Richard Widmark did to her in that movie.
Reasons: Dunnock was nominated in very bad years and was burned out by the competition.
Trivia: Was a founding member of the Actors Studio.

193. Geraldine Fitzgerald

Though best known for playing the clueless Isabelle Linton from Wuthering Heights, Irish-American actress Geraldine Fitzgerald enjoyed a long acting career in film, theater, and television. Of course, we're not sure if her son's father was Orson Welles even though it's rumored to be.

Though best known for playing the clueless Isabelle Linton from Wuthering Heights, Irish-American actress Geraldine Fitzgerald enjoyed a long acting career in film, theater, and television. Of course, we’re not sure if her son’s father was Orson Welles even though it’s rumored to be.

Personal Life: (1913-2005) Born in Greystones, County Wicklow in Ireland. Father was an attorney. Studied painting at the Dublin School of Art and the Polytechnic School of Art. Debuted on stage in 1932 and made her first film in 1934. Became a US citizen during WWII. Married twice and had 2 children. Married to second husband Stuart Scheftel for 48 years. Retired in 1991. Died in New York City of Alzheimer’s Disease at 91.
Famous for: Irish American actress whose career spanned 59 years. Notable roles are
Maggie Tulliver from The Mill of the Floss, Isabella from Wuthering Heights, Ann King from Dark Victory, Marthe de Brancovis from Watch on the Rhine, Edith Bolling Galt from Wilson,
Ellen Rogers / Elaine Duprez from O. S. S., Gladys Halvorsen from Nobody Lives Forever, Elizabeth Grahame from The Obsessed, Marilyn Birchfield from The Pawnbroker, Rev. Wood from Rachel, Rachel, Mrs. Jackson from The Last American Hero, Jessie from Harry and Tonto, Grandma Carr from The Mango Tree, Maud Kennaway from Diary of the Dead, Martha Bach from Arthur, and Mrs. Monahan from Easy Money.
Nominated for: Fitzgerald was nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1939 for Wuthering Heights.
Most Crushing Loss: Not receiving an honorary Oscar for her long and varied career.
Reasons: Perhaps it’s due to that we’re not sure who Michael Lindsay-Hogg’s father who’s said to resemble Orson Welles. Also was burned by the competition in 1939.
Trivia: Second husband was grandson of Isidor Straus who died on the Titanic. Was one of the first women to receive a Tony nomination for directing. Spent time as a cabaret singer in the 1970s. Mother of Let It Be director Michael Lindsay-Hogg but we’re not sure whether his father was her first husband or Orson Welles.

194. Nina Foch

Though most famous as Moses' adoptive mother in The Ten Commandments, Dutch born Nina Foch often played aloof, and often foreign women of sophistication. She was also blonde by the way and started in horror movies.

Though most famous as Moses’ adoptive mother in The Ten Commandments, Dutch born Nina Foch often played aloof, and often foreign women of sophistication. She was also blonde by the way and started in horror movies.

Personal Life: (1924-2008) Born Nina Consuelo Maud Fock in Leiden, Netherlands. Mother was an American actress and singer while father was a Dutch classical music conductor. Went with her mother to the US as a toddler after her parents divorced. Made her first film in 1943. Married 3 times and had a son to second husband Dennis de Brito. Lived at Beverly Hills for over 40 years. Died of complications from the blood disorder myelodysplasia (or kidney disease) at 84.
Famous for: Dutch-born American actress and leading lady in films from the 1940s to the 1950s. Played cool, aloof, and often foreign women of sophistication. Appeared in over 80 films and hundreds of TV shows. Notable roles are Nicki Saunders from The Return of the Vampire, Lois Garland from Shadows in the Night, Celeste from Cry of the Werewolf, Frieda Brenner from Strange Affair, Constantia from A Song to Remember, Milo Roberts from An American in Paris, Marie Antoinette from Scaramouche, Elena Cantu from Sombrero, Erica Martin from Executive Suite, Bithiah from The Ten Commandments, and Helena Glabrus from Spartacus.
Nominated for: Foch was nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1954 for Executive Suite.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1960 for Spartacus. Yes, she didn’t have enough screen time but her portrayal of a Roman aristocrat was one of the most historically accurate in movie history.
Reasons: Probably had to do with the fact she was in a lot of horror movies early in her career. Also burned by the competition when she was nominated. I mean it should’ve been clear that Eva Marie Saint was going to win.
Trivia: Taught at the University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts as well as spent time as an acting coach. Last name “Foch” rhymes with “Gosh” (I can see where mispronunciations can get out of hand).

195. Cyd Charisse

Born Tula Ellice Finklea, Cyd Charisse adopted her stage name by using an alternative spelling of her brother's nickname for her which was a mispronunciation of "Sis" and the surname of her first husband Nico. Also known for her long legs.

Born Tula Ellice Finklea, Cyd Charisse adopted her stage name by using an alternative spelling of her brother’s nickname for her which was a mispronunciation of “Sis” and the surname of her first husband Nico. Also known for her long legs.

Personal Life: (1922-2008) Born Tula Ellice Finklea in Amarillo, Texas. Father was a jeweler. Took dancing lessons as a child to overcome a bout of polio. Auditioned and danced for the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo. Went to Hollywood after the company broke up in WWII. Made her first film in 1943. Married twice and had a son to each husband. Married to second husband Tony Martin for 60 years. Retired in 2007. Died of a heart attack at 86.
Famous for: American actress and singer whose abilities were featured in 1940s and 1950s musicals and transitioned to straight acting in the 1950s. Notable roles are Lily from Something to Shout About, Deborah Andrews from The Harvey Girls, Ballerina from The Ziegfeld Follies, Conchita from Fiesta, Rosa Senta from East Side, West Side, Dancer from Singin’ in the Rain, Gabrielle Gerard from The Band Wagon, Fiona Campbell from Brigadoon, Jackie Leighton from It’s Always Fair Weather, Maria Corvier from Meet Me in Las Vegas, Ninotchka Yoschenko from Silk Stockings, Charlotte King from Twilight of the Gods, and Sarita from The Silencers.
Nominated for: Charisse was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not receiving an honorary Oscar for her career. Seriously, she’s one of the best known dancers in 1950s musicals. Not to mention, she had to make herself look shorter than some of her co-stars like Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire which was no easy task.
Reasons: Charisse is best known for her dancing in musicals and her long marriage to Tony Martin but not much else. And basically only acted sporadically after the 1950s.
Trivia: Was listed under The Guinness Book of World Records for “Most Valuable Legs” because it’s said MGM reportedly insured for $5 million, though she claimed this was false. Wrote a joint memoir with second husband Tony Martin. Stage name originated from her brother’s nickname for her, “Sid” which was a mispronunciation of “Sis” and the last name of her first husband Nico Charisse. Awarded the National Medal of the Arts and Humanities in 2006. Daughter-in-law died in the American Airlines Flight 191 tragedy on May 25, 1979. Produced an exercise video targeted to senior citizens.

196. Una O’Connor

Born in a Catholic nationalist family in Northern Ireland, Una O'Connor would have an extensive career as a character actress mainly playing comical wives, housekeepers, and servants, especially in 1930s horror movies.

Born in a Catholic nationalist family in Northern Ireland, Una O’Connor would have an extensive career as a character actress mainly playing comical wives, housekeepers, and servants, especially in 1930s horror movies.

Personal Life: (1880-1959) Born Agnes Teresa McGlade in Belfast, Ireland to a Catholic Nationalist family. Changed her name when she began acting at Dublin’s Abbey Theatre. Made her first film in 1930. Never married or had children. Retired in 1957. Died of a heart attack at 78.
Famous for: Irish character actress known for playing comical wives, housekeepers, and servants. Notable roles are Ellen Bridges from Cavalcade, Jenny Hall from The Invisible Man, Wilson from The Barretts of Wimpole Street, Mrs. Gummidge from David Copperfield, Mrs. McPhillip from The Informer, Minnie from Bride of Frankenstein, Mary from Little Lord Fauntleroy, Bess from The Adventures of Robin Hood, Miss Latham from The Sea Hawk, Mrs. Mulcahey from The Strawberry Blonde, Marie from Lillian Russell, Tobacconist from Random Harvest, Norah from Christmas in Connecticut, Sarah Leek from Holy Matrimony, Mrs. Umney from The Canterville Ghost, Mrs. Breen from The Bells of St. Mary’s, Mrs. Foreman from Of Human Bondage, Duenna from The Adventures of Don Juan, and Janet from Witness for the Prosecution.
Nominated for: O’Connor was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1957 for Witness for the Prosecution.
Reasons: She was basically typecast as the female comic relief. Also known to appear in a lot of horror movies and came from a Catholic nationalist family from Northern Ireland.
Trivia: Would not work on any radio program sponsored by a company that distributed or manufactured alcohol in any form.

197. Dame Flora Robson

Dame Flora Robson may not have had the looks of a leading lady, yet she played a wide range of roles on stage and screen from queens to killers. She also played Queen Elizabeth I in 2 movies.

Dame Flora Robson may not have had the looks of a leading lady, yet she played a wide range of roles on stage and screen from queens to killers. She also played Queen Elizabeth I in 2 movies.

Personal Life: (1902-1984) Born in South Shields, Durham in England. Came from a family of engineers and her father was a ship’s engineer who noticed her talent at 5. Grew up in London and attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. Made her stage debut at 19 but found it difficult to get parts because she lacked the conventional looks (she had a long face, big nose, and wide mouth). Made her first film in 1931. Private life mostly focused on her sisters so she never married or had children. Retired in 1981. Possibly died of cancer at 82.
Famous for: British actress and star of stage and cinema particularly renowned for her performances in plays demanding dramatic and emotional intensity. Range extended from queens to murderesses. Notable roles are Empress Elisabeth from The Rise of Catherine the Great, Livia from I, Claudius, Queen Elizabeth I of England from Fire Over England and The Sea Hawk, Ellen from Wuthering Heights, Angelique Buiton from Saratoga Trunk, Ftatateeta from Caesar and Cleopatra, Sister Philippa from Black Narcissus, Countess Clara Platen from Saraband, Nurse from Romeo and Juliet, Dowager Empress Tzu-Hsi from 55 Days at Peking, Miss Milchrest from Murder at the Gallop, Mrs. Cassidy from Young Cassidy, Queen of Hearts from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, and A Stygian Witch from Clash of the Titans.
Nominated for: Robson was nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1946 for Saratoga Trunk.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for any roles in her better known films most notably for Best Supporting Actress in 1947 for Black Narcissus.
Reasons: Robson was better known as a British actress on the stage than in Hollywood films. Also, Saratoga Trunk wasn’t a good movie according to critics. Not to mention being burned by the competition.
Trivia: Was of Scottish descent. Received an honorary doctorate from Durham University. Became a dame in 1960.

198. Ann Sothern

Ann Southern was an actress of many talents who performed on radio, stage, and screen for decades as well as started a variety of businesses she managed. She also survived hepatitis and a back injury in the1970s as well as lived to 92.

Ann Southern was an actress of many talents who performed on radio, stage, and screen for decades as well as started a variety of businesses she managed. She also survived hepatitis and a back injury in the1970s as well as lived to 92.

Personal Life: (1909-2001) Born Harriet Arlene Lake in Valley City, North Dakota. Mother was a concert singer and later vocal coach for Warner Bros. while father worked in importing and exporting. Grew up in Minneapolis, Minnesota. At 4, her parents separated and would divorce in 1927. Started taking piano lessons at 5 and accompanied her mother in concert tours as long as school permitted it. Began voice lessons at 14. Attended the University of Washington but dropped out after a year and soon joined her mother where she won a role in a Warner Bros. revue. Made her first film in 1927. Married twice and had a daughter to second husband Robert Sterling. Contracted infections hepatitis after getting impure serum from England in the late 1940s which confined her to a bed. In 1974, she was injured in Jacksonville, Florida when a fake tree fell on her back which left her with a fractured lumbar vertebrae and damaged nerves in her legs. She was then subject to multiple hospitalizations, weight gain, back braces, depression, physical pain, and had to walk with a cane for the rest of her life. Retired in 1987 and moved to Ketchum, where she lived for the rest of her life. Died of heart failure at 92.
Famous for: American actress whose career spanned 6 decades starting from bit parts to starring roles. Worked on stage, radio, film, and television. Notable roles are Maisie Ravier from The Maisie series, Flo Adams from Brother Orchid, Joyce Harmon from Words and Music, Rita Phipps from A Letter to Three Wives, Crystal Carpenter from The Blue Gardenia, Sue Ellen Gamadge from The Best Man, Sade from Lady in a Cage, Mrs. Grace Argona from Sylvia, and Tisha Doughty from The Whales of August.
Nominated for: Sothern was nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1987 for The Whales of August.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1949 for A Letter to Three Wives.
Reasons: Sothern was just burned by the competition during her nomination. Also, she only acted sporadically in her later years.
Trivia: Maternal grandfather was Danish violinist Hans Nielsen and paternal grandfather was Quaker engineer and naval architect Simon Lake. Won a state sponsored contest for student musical composer 3 years in a row in high school. Was a classmate of Eddie Albert in high school and graduated in the same class with him. Converted to Roman Catholicism in 1952 and credited her faith with helping her get over her health issues. Had her own TV show. Opened the Ann Sothern Sewing Center in Sun Valley, Idaho which sold fabric, patterns and sewing machines in the 1950s. Had a cattle ranch in Idaho named the A Bar S Cattle Company. Owned Vincent Productions, Inc. as well as nightclubs in Las Vegas and Chicago. Also had her own music company called A Bar S Music Company and released albums. Mother of Tisha Sterling.

199. Jeanne Crain

While Jean Crain striven to be a serious actress on film, the studios always wanted her to play cute girls. For instance, despite thinking that Pinky would lead to better roles, 20th Century Fox cast her as a 13 year old girl despite that she was 25, married, and a mom.

While Jean Crain striven to be a serious actress on film, the studios always wanted her to play cute girls. For instance, despite thinking that Pinky would lead to better roles, 20th Century Fox cast her as a 13 year old girl despite that she was 25, married, and a mom.

Personal Life: (1925-2003) Born in Barstow, California and grew up in Los Angeles. Father was a school teacher. Was given a screen test opposite Orson Welles while in high school but didn’t get the part. Made her first film at 18 in 1943. Married to Paul Brinkman for 57 years (though they were separated at the time of his death) and had 7 children. Retired in 1975. Died of a heart attack at 78.
Famous for: American actress whose career spanned for 38 years. Worked from bit parts to starring roles. Notable roles are Margy Frake from State Fair, Ruth Berent from Leave Her to Heaven, Marjorie ‘Margie’ MacDuff from Margie, Julia Rogers from Centennial Summer, Deborah Bishop from A Letter to Three Wives, Patricia ‘Pinky’ Johnson from Pinky, Ann Gilbreth from Cheaper by the Dozen, Deborah Higgins from People Will Talk, Deborah Young from O. Henry’s Full House, Ruth Stanton Bowman from Dangerous Crossing, Connie Jones/Mitzi Jones from Gentlemen Marry Brunettes, Dora Temple from The Fastest Gun Alive, Diane Blane from The Tattered Dress, Letty Page from The Joker Is Wild, Laura Riley from Guns in the Timberland, Tenet/Nefertiti from Nefertiti, Queen of the Nile, Peggy Shannon from Madison Avenue, and Claudia Procula.
Nominated for: Crain was nominated for Best Actress in 1949 for Pinky.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1945 for Leave Her to Heaven. As Gene Tierney’s adoptive sister, she manages to hide a large amount of angst underneath that veneer of smiles and wholesomeness.
Reasons: Crain was more or less burned by the competition. Also, her character was supposed to be black passing for white, which should’ve went to Lena Horne anyway. Not to mention, while she hoped her role in Pinky would give her more serious parts, 20th Century Fox had other ideas like casting her as a 13 year old despite being 25, married, and a mother. Being cast as cute girls would get her passed over for more serious roles she should’ve played.
Trivia: Also noted for her ice skating. Miss Pan Pacific at the Pan-Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles while in high school. In the late 1940s and early 1950s, was nicknamed ‘Hollywood’s Number One party girl’, and she was quoted saying that she was invited to at least 200 parties a year. Was earning $3,500 a week in the 1950s as well as her own dress line during the 1970s.

200. Madeleine Carroll

Madeleine Carroll would make movie history with her appearance in The 39 Steps as Alfred Hitchcock's first icy blonde that would appear in many of his later films. Yet, her service during WWII were just as remarkable as well.

Madeleine Carroll would make movie history with her appearance in The 39 Steps as Alfred Hitchcock’s first icy blonde that would appear in many of his later films. Yet, her service during WWII were just as remarkable as well.

Personal Life: (1906-1987) Born Edith Madeleine Carroll in West Bromwich, Staffordshire in England. Mother was a French immigrant while father was an Irish professor of languages. Attended and graduated from the University of Birmingham and taught an all girls’ boarding school. Made her first film in 1928. Married 4 times with second husband being Sterling Hayden. Had a daughter with fourth husband Andrew Heiskell. Became a US citizen in 1944. Moved to Paris in 1951 and would later move to Spain. Retired in 1955. Died in Marabella, Spain from pancreatic cancer at 81.
Famous for: British American actress who was popular in both the 1930s and 1940s. At the peak of her success she was the highest paid actress in the world, earning a then staggering $250,000 in 1938. Notable roles are Diana Cheswick from The Guns of Loos, Lucille de Choisigne from Madame Guillotine, Queen Caroline Matilde of Denmark from Loves of a Dictator, Pamela from The 39 Steps, Elsa Carrington from Secret Agent, Judy Perrie from The General Died at Dawn, Linda Stewart from Safari, Charlotte Dunterry from Virginia, Carol Delbridge from Bahama Passage, Karen Bentley from My Favorite Blonde, and Mrs. Erlynne from The Fan.
Nominated for: Carroll was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not receiving an honorary Oscar for her career and her distinction as the prototype for the icy Hitchcock blonde. Also, not receiving the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award for her tireless efforts during and after WWII.
Reasons: Well, for one, there weren’t as many slots for Academy Award nominees as there are now in the 1930s (especially in the early years). Also, took an acting hiatus in WWII after her sister was killed in a German air raid during the Blitz and would be involved in the plight of European children some time afterwards.
Trivia: Was the first Hitchcock blonde. Was a Red Cross (and later US Army Air Corps) nurse during WWII after her sister was killed in the Blitz. Donated her chateau outside Paris to more than 150 orphans and arranged groups in California to knit for them. Awarded the Legion d’Honneur for her efforts by France as well as the American Medal of Freedom. Dwight D. Eisenhower said that of all the movie stars he met in Europe during the war, he was the most impressed with her and Herbert Marshall. Conducted a radio program fostering French-American friendship and helped in the rehabilitation of concentration camp victims after WWII. Formed a production company with her third husband which made several 2 reel documentaries with one strongly shown in Canada focusing on the devastation of children’s lives in WWII Europe which became a prime source of funds of for the manufacture of artificial limbs for wounded children. First British beauty to be offered a major American film contract. Fourth husband was publisher of Life Magazine.

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Movie Stars Who Have Never Won an Oscar: Part 19 – Hume Cronyn To Billie Burke

Fay Wray was most famous for playing Ann Darrow in King Kong in which she is the love interest to one of the biggest leading men Hollywood which was really a stuffed toy used in trick photography while terrorizing New York City.

Fay Wray was most famous for playing Ann Darrow in King Kong in which she is the love interest to one of the biggest leading men Hollywood which was really a stuffed toy used in trick photography while terrorizing New York City.

Seems like we’re getting close to the end here and one more to go after this. Of course, we all know that visual effects have always been a mainstay in Hollywood since King Kong came out in the 1930s. It was released by Universal, a studio which was also know for all their great horror and monster movies your parents probably seen when they were kids. I’m not sure how many of them were scared but the visual effects don’t really translate well for those who’ve been raised on Star Wars and CGI. In this penultimate installment, I give you 10 more legendary movie stars from the Golden Age of Hollywood or at least retired or dead. First, there is Hume Cronyn who’s better known as Jessica Tandy’s Canadian husband followed by William Demarest who appeared in 140 films. Second, is Henry Travers you most people remember as Clarence the angel from It’s a Wonderful Life followed by fellow Brit supporting player Leo Genn. After that is River Phoenix who’s best known as a promising young actor who succumbed to a drug induced death at 23. Then we have Billie Burke who’s better known as Glinda the Good Witch from The Wizard of Oz as well a British swashbuckler Stewart Granger. Next, is versatile actress Ann Sheridan who was a pin-up in the 1940s in which she was known as “The Oomph Girl” as well as 1960s sex symbol Carroll Baker. And finally, we have pioneering scream queen Fay Wray who most of us remember from King Kong. So without further adieu, here are 10 more Oscar losers and also-rans in this pentultimate installment of my stars series.

181. Hume Cronyn

Hume Cronyn is best known for his long career and his professional and 50 year marriage to Jessica Tandy with whom they appeared in various plays, movies, and TV shows until her death in 1994.

Hume Cronyn is best known for his long career and his professional and 50 year marriage to Jessica Tandy with whom they appeared in various plays, movies, and TV shows until her death in 1994.

Personal Life: (1911-2003) Born in London, Ontario in Canada. Father was a businessman and Member of Parliament. Mother was heiress of the Labatt Brewing Company. Studied pre-law and drama at Ridley College and McGill University. Studied acting at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts under Max Reinhardt. Made his Broadway debut in 1934. Made his first film in 1943. Married 3 times with his second wife of 52 years being Jessica Tandy to whom he had 2 kids. Became a US citizen late in life. Died of prostate cancer in Connecticut at 91.
Famous for: Canadian American actor best known for his 79 year career and often appearing professionally with his wife Jessica Tandy in 13 films. Notable roles are Herbie Hawkins from Shadow of a Doubt, Duval from The Cross of Lorraine, Stanley ‘Sparks’ Garett from Lifeboat, Paul Roeder from The Seventh Cross, Capt. Munsey from Brute Force, Louis Howe from Sunrise at Campobello, Sosigenes from Cleopatra, Polonius from Richard Burton’s Hamlet, Mr. Fields from The World According to Garp, Joe Finley from Cocoon, Justice Rosenberg from The Pelican Brief, and Marvin from Marvin’s Room.
Nominated for: Cronyn was nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1945 for The Seventh Cross.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1947 for Brute Force. As a brutal prison guard, he’s almost as cruel as the ones from The Shawshank Redemption.
Reasons: During his nomination, he was just burned by the competition. Yet, I didn’t think Barry Fitzgerald should’ve won that year.
Trivia: Great-grandfather was an archbishop and founder of Huron College that became the University of Western Ontario. Great-uncle was mayor of London, Ontario but fled to Vermont after being indicted for fraud and also built a mansion called Oakwood. Dad has an observatory dedicated to him. Won 2 Tony Awards.

182. William Demarest

Though some may know him for playing Uncle Charlie in My Three Sons, William Demarest had a prolific acting career with 140 films. And out of his movie career, he's particularly known for his movies with Preston Sturges.

Though some may know him for playing Uncle Charlie in My Three Sons, William Demarest had a prolific acting career with 140 films. And out of his movie career, he’s particularly known for his movies with Preston Sturges.

Personal Life: (1892-1983) Born in Saint Paul, Minnesota. Yet, family moved to New Bridge, New Jersey when he was a baby. Was a US Army veteran from WWI and a former professional boxer. Started out on vaudeville often performing with his first wife before moving to Broadway. Married twice with his second marriage to Lucy Thayer that lasted for 44 years. Retired in 1978. Died of prostate cancer and pneumonia at 91.
Famous for: American character actor known for appearing in over 140 films between the 1920s and 1970s. Best known for his collaborations with Preston Sturges. One of the most recognizable voices in movie history. Notable roles are Buster Billings from The Jazz Singer, Wallace Whistling from Easy Living, Henry Kipper from Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, Bill Griffith from Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Victor Walsh from The Farmer’s Daughter,
Skeeters – The Politician from The Great McGinty, Muggsy from The Lady Eve, Mr. Jones from Sullivan’s Travels, First Member Ale and Quail Club from The Palm Beach Story, Constable Edmund Kockenlocker from The Miracle of Morgan’s Creek, Sgt. Heppelfinger from Hail the Conquering Hero, Steve Martin from The Jolson Story, Cpl. Kiper from What Price Glory, Father Belacchi from The Mountain, and Mr. Martin from Viva Las Vegas.
Nominated for: Demarest was nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1947 for The Jolson Story.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1941 for The Lady Eve as Henry Fonda’s smart ass valet who basically steals every scene he’s in.
Reasons: I think his collaborations with Preston Sturges might’ve made him Oscar ineligible, especially the Miracle on Morgan’s Creek. Also, was better known for his comic performances.
Trivia: Was Uncle Charlie on My Three Sons. Favorite recreations were hunting, fishing, golf, and playing the cello.

183. Henry Travers

Since his career began in the 1890s, it should be no surprise to us that Henry Travers was already an older man when he began acting in the 1930s. Specialized in bumbling but friendly and loveable old men, most famously Clarence from It's a Wonderful Life.

Since his career began in the 1890s, it should be no surprise to us that Henry Travers was already an older man when he began acting in the 1930s. Specialized in bumbling but friendly and loveable old men, most famously Clarence from It’s a Wonderful Life.

Personal Life: (1874-1965) Born Travers John Heagerty in Prudhoe, Northumberland in England. Father was a doctor. Trained as an architect before taking to the stage as Henry Travers. Started acting in 1894 and made his first film in 1933. Immigrated to the US in 1917 and appeared on Broadway. Married twice. Retired in 1949. Died of arteriosclerosis at 91.
Famous for: British actor best known for his character roles in movies between the 1930s and 1940s. Usually played shy and bumbling but loveable older men and authority figures like doctors, judges, and dads in supporting roles. Notable roles are Dr. Cranley from The Invisible Man, Baron Cesarea from Death Takes a Holiday, Dr. Parsons from Dark Victory, John Kingsley from Stanley and Livingston, Pa from High Sierra, Prof. Jerome from Ball of Fire, Mr. Ballard from Mrs. Miniver, Eugene Curie from Madame Curie, Horace P. Bogardus from The Bells of St. Mary’s, Mr. Boyles from The Yearling, Joseph Newton from Shadow of a Doubt, and Clarence Odbody from It’s a Wonderful Life.
Nominated for: Travers was nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1943 for Mrs. Miniver.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1946 for It’s a Wonderful Life.
Reasons: Travers was already typecast by this point in his career as a kindly old man, especially after playing Clarence from It’s a Wonderful Life.
Trivia: Was of Irish extraction.

184. Leo Genn

While watching the 1956 Moby Dick you have to wonder whether Leo Genn is conflicted about wanting to throw Captain Ahab to the sharks as Starbuck. Then again, his Quaker sense of honor wouldn't allow him.

While watching the 1956 Moby Dick you have to wonder whether Leo Genn is conflicted about wanting to throw Captain Ahab to the sharks as Starbuck. Then again, his Quaker sense of honor wouldn’t allow him.

Personal Life: (1905-1978) Born in London. Father was a jewelry salesman. Studied law at Cambridge University. Made his theater debut in 1930 and member of the Old Vic Company. Made his first film in 1935. Served in the Royal Artillery during WWII and rose to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. Married to Marguerite van Praag for 45 years. Died of a heart attack at 72.
Famous for: British actor whose career spanned between the 1930s and 1970s. Notable roles are The Constable of France from Henry V, Bel Affris from Caesar and Cleopatra, Adam Brant from Mourning Becomes Electra, Dr. Mark Kik from The Snake Pit, Petronius from The Snake Pit, William Bradford from Plymouth Adventure, Sir Clifford Chatterley from Lady Chatterly’s Lover, Starbuck from Moby Dick, Maj. Picquart from I Accuse!, Gen. Jung-Lu from 55 Days at Peking, and Dr. Lytell from Cover Up.
Nominated for: Genn was nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1952 for Quo Vadis.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1956 for Moby Dick. Sure he may not have a showy role but man, he just gives a great performance of a guy just wanting to do his job yet very conflicted about feeding Gregory Peck’s Captain Ahab to the sharks. Still, it’s kind of sad that his character’s name is now the moniker for a major coffee chain based in Seattle.
Reasons: Genn was nominated for an Oscar in a very bad year and was burned by the competition. Not to mention, he starred in a lot of forgettable movies soon afterward.
Trivia: Was a qualified lawyer. Was part of the British unit that investigated Bergen Belsen concentration camp during WWII. Awarded the Croix de Guerre. Wife was an Ealing Studios casting director. Was given official leave to appear in Sir Laurence Olivier’s Henry V. Served as a governor and trustee for 2 theaters. Appointed Distinguished Visiting Professor of Theater Arts at Penn State in 1968 and Visiting Professor of Drama at the University of Utah in 1969.

185. River Phoenix

I am not familiar with River Phoenix's work in film. Yet, his story as a child raised by hippies who later became a promising young actor whose life was cut short by drugs at 23, his story is now inspiring contemporary legend.

I am not familiar with River Phoenix’s work in film. Yet, his story as a child raised by hippies who later became a promising young actor whose life was cut short by drugs at 23, his story is now inspiring contemporary legend.

Personal Life: (1970-1993) Born River Bottom in Madras, Oregon. Parents were hippies who joined a Christian cult at one time called Children of God as missionaries but later became an exteriors architect and secretary to an NBC broadcaster. Spent part of his childhood in the Caribbean and Venezuela where his family became vegans. Family name changed to Phoenix when they moved to Florida. Never attended formal school. Collapsed and died of drug-induced heart failure on the sidewalk outside the West Hollywood nightclub The Viper Room, at 23.
Famous for: American actor, musician and activist whose rise to fame lent to the status of “teen sensation.” Started acting in commercials from the age of 10. Notable roles are Wolfgang Müller from Explorers, Chris Chambers from Stand By Me, Charlie Fox from The Mosquito Coast, Jeff Grant from Little Nikita, Danny Pope / Michael Manfield from Running on Empty, Devo Nod from I Love You to Death, Eddie Birdlace from Dogfight, Mike Waters from My Own Private Idaho, and James Wright from The Thing Called Love.
Nominated for: Phoenix was nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1988 for Running on Empty.
Most Crushing Loss: I’m not really sure because I’m not very familiar with his performances. Yet his status as a promising teen idol and his subsequent premature death is basically what made him so famous in pop culture today. Of course, many would say losing the Oscar to Kevin Kline in the 1988 Best Supporting Actor race, but I’m not sure if I’d go that far since A Fish Called Wanda actually is very funny and that the Academy usually ignores great comic performances.
Reasons: Well, most likely burned by the competition by much more experienced actors. Not to mention, at this point most people thought he’d probably get his chance someday but died young.
Trivia: Brother of Joaquin, Rain, Liberty, and Summer Phoenix. Was an environmental and animal rights activist as well as spokesman for PETA.

186. Stewart Granger

Born James Stewart but changed it for obvious reasons, Stewart Granger specialized in heroic and romantic leads during the 1940s and 1950s. Of course, some of his best lines consist of: "Mr. President, the deputy from Soissons will be absent from this assembly... permanently. "

Born James Stewart but changed it for obvious reasons, Stewart Granger specialized in heroic and romantic leads during the 1940s and 1950s. Of course, some of his best lines consist of: “Mr. President, the deputy from Soissons will be absent from this assembly… permanently. “

Personal Life: (1913-1993) Born James Stewart in London. Dad was a major. Attended the Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art. Obviously advised to change his name since the name “James Stewart” was already taken in the movie business. Served in the Gordon Highlanders and Black Watch, rising to the rank of Second Lieutenant until he was invalidated out of the British Army for stomach ulcers. Made his first film in 1933. Married 3 times with his second wife being Jean Simmons and had 4 children. Became a US citizen in 1956. Retired to southern Spain in the 1970s but returned to acting in 1981 mostly appearing on television. Died of prostate and bone cancer at 80.
Famous for: British actor mainly associated with heroic and romantic leading roles. Popular leading man from the 1940s to 1960s. Notable roles are Peter Rokeby from The Man in Grey, Harry Somerford from Man of Evil, Apollodorus from Caesar and Cleopatra, Richard Darrell from Caravan, Nicolo Paganini from The Magic Bow, Adam Black from Adam and Evalyn, Allan Quartermain from King Solomon’s Mines, Andre Moreau from Scaramouche,
Rudolf Rassendyll / King Rudolf V from The Prisoner of Zenda, Commander Claudius from Salome, Thomas Seymour from Young Bess, Beau Brummell, Stephen Lowry from Footsteps in the Fog, George Pratt from North to Alaska, Maj. Richard Mace from The Secret Invasion,
Old Surehand from The Oil Prince, Jimmy Merrill from Requiem for a Secret Agent, and Matherson / Sir Edward Matherson from The Wild Geese.
Nominated for: Granger was never nominated for an Oscar (yet he was for a bunch of Bambis from Germany).
Most Crushing Loss: Not receiving an honorary Oscar for his lifetime achievements.
Reasons: Well, despite being a very popular star at the box office with his British performances attracting Hollywood attention, Granger wasn’t a darling to American and British critics. However, this was a very different story in Continental Europe, particularly in Germany.
Trivia: Second great grandfather was an opera singer. Was friends with Michael Wilding who’s best known as Elizabeth Taylor’s second husband and father of her 2 sons. Married Jean Simmons in a bizarre wedding ceremony in Tucson, organized by Howard Hughes. Was a successful cattle rancher but gave it up during his divorce from Jean Simmons. Did his own stunt work. Was a notable fencer.

187. Carroll Baker

Carroll Baker's breakthrough Oscar-nominated performance in Baby Doll caused a lot of controversy during the 1950s and she would go on to enjoy fame as a serious actress and a sex symbol. Yet, when Hollywood tired of her, she performed in the foreign exploitation market.

Carroll Baker’s breakthrough Oscar-nominated performance in Baby Doll caused a lot of controversy during the 1950s and she would go on to enjoy fame as a serious actress and a sex symbol. Yet, when Hollywood tired of her, she performed in the Italian slasher film market.

Personal Life: (1931-present) Born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. Father was a traveling salesman. Parents divorced at 8 and she grew up in Turtle Creek and Greensburg before attending St. Pete Junior College in St. Petersburg, Florida. Worked as a magician’s assistant and joined a dance company. Later moved to New York City where she studied under Lee Strasberg and was part of the Actors Studio. Was discovered by Elia Kazan while on Broadway and in TV commercials. Made her first film in 1953. Married 3 times and had 2 children to second husband Jack Garfein. Married to third husband Donald Barton for 29 years.
Famous for: American actress who has enjoyed popularity as a serious dramatic actress and as a sex symbol. Was cast in a wide range of roles during the 1960s and was especially memorable playing brash and flamboyant women due to her beautiful features, striking blonde hair, and distinctive drawl. Career spanned 50 years and made 80 films. Notable roles are Luz Benedict II from Giant, Baby Doll Meighan from Baby Doll, Patricia Terrill from The Big Country, Mary Ann Robinson from Something Wild, Rina Marlowe Cord from The Carpetbaggers, Deborah Wright from Cheyenne Autumn, Sylvia: West (Karoki, Kay, Carlyle) from Sylvia, Veronica from The Greatest Story Ever Told, Julie Anderson from Mister Moses, Jean Harlow from Harlow, Kathryn West from Paranoia, Baba Yaga, Hazel Aiken from Andy Warhol’s Bad, Helen Curtis from The Watcher in the Woods, Nelly Hoogstraten from Star 80, Annie Phelan from Ironweed, Eleanor Crisp from Kindergarten Cop, Madame from Jackpot, and Ilsa from The Game.
Nominated for: Baker was nominated for Best Actress in 1956 for Baby Doll.
Most Crushing Loss: Losing to Ingrid Bergman in 1956. Seriously, Baker should’ve at least lost to Deborah Kerr. Also, her loss may have been a bit unfair and due to the Moral Police if you get my drift.
Reasons: Well, she was a seen as a sex symbol and the fact that her movie Baby Doll was condemned by the Roman Catholic National Legion of Decency. Also was said to be blackballed later in her career for turning down parts and being viciously attacked by the press as well as protracted legal battles with Paramount. Not to mention, her European career consisted of hard-edged giallo thrillers, exploitation, and horror films which included sensual nude scenes.
Trivia: Converted to Judaism for her second husband who was a Holocaust survivor. Was friends with Marilyn Monroe and James Dean. Was fluent in Italian. Wrote 4 books. Son is composer and faculty member at the Steinhardt School of Music at New York University.

188. Fay Wray

Though best known for playing a blonde scream queen taken to the Empire State Building in King Kong, Fay Wray was actually a brunette who wore a wig during the filming. Also was a Canadian and Mormon.

Though best known for playing a blonde scream queen taken to the Empire State Building in King Kong, Fay Wray was actually a brunette who wore a wig during the filming. Also was a Canadian and Mormon.

Personal Life: (1907-2004) Born in Cardston, Alberta in Canada to Mormon parents. Family moved to Salt Lake City shortly after she was born and later to Lark and eventually Los Angeles. Made her first film in 1926 at 16 and soon secured a contract with Paramount Pictures. Married 3 times with second husband being screenwriter Robert Riskin and had 3 children. Married to third husband neurosurgeon Dr. Sanford Rothenberg for 20 years. Became a US citizen in 1933. Retired in 1980. Died of natural causes at her Manhattan apartment at 96.
Famous for: Canadian-American actress most noted for playing the female lead in King Kong. Career spanned 57 years and attained fame as an in horror movie roles. One of the first, “scream queens.” Notable roles are Mitzi / Mitzerl Schrammell from The Wedding March, Ethne Eustace from The Four Feathers, Joan Randall from The Border Legion, Lee Carleton from Three Rogues, Helen Pierce from Dirigible, Eve from The Most Dangerous Game, Ann Darrow from King Kong, Marcia Collins from The Finger Points, Charlotte Duncan from Mystery of the Wax Museum, Diana from Below the Sea, Marie Franck from Madame Spy, Teresa from Viva Villa!, Gail Hamilton from Black Moon, Angela from The Affairs of Cellini, Sue McKinnon from Queen Bee, and Beth Daley from Summer Love.
Nominated for: Wray was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actress in 1933 for King Kong. Then again, this isn’t surprising.
Reasons: Wray was best known as a scream queen in horror movies and is best known for playing love interest to a giant mutant gorilla with a white woman fixation. Yeah, it’s easy to see why she didn’t get one.
Trivia: Despite her role in King Kong, she was actually a brunette and wore wig during the filming. Was cast in a sitcom during the 1950s. Two days after her death the lights of the Empire State Building dimmed for 15 minutes in her memory. Has a park named after her at her birthplace.

189. Ann Sheridan

Though known as "The Oomph Girl" a name she hated, Ann Sheridan would achieve fame as a a versatile actress with a career that spanned 33 years.

Though known as “The Oomph Girl” a name she hated, Ann Sheridan would achieve fame as a a versatile actress with a career that spanned 33 years.

Personal Life: (1915-1967) Born Clara Lou Sheridan in Denton, Texas. Was a student at the University of Texas when her sister sent a photo of her to Paramount. This led to entering a beauty contest she won with her prize having a bit part in a Paramount film. She’d play bits for the next 2 years before signing with Warner Bros. and changing her stage name Ann Sheridan. Married 3 times with her one year second marriage being to George Brent. Died of esophageal and liver cancer at 51.
Famous for: American actress whose career spanned for 33 years and known for her versatility. Notable roles are Nurse from The Glass Key, Judy Nolan from The Great O’Malley, May from San Quentin, Flo Allen from Alcatraz Island, Ruby Gilman from Dodge City, Cassie Hartley from They Drive by Night, Lorraine Sheldon from The Man Who Came to Dinner, Randy Monaghan from Kings Row, Connie Fuller from George Washington Slept Here,
Karen Stensgard from Edge of Darkness, Nora Prentiss, Chris Hunter from The Unfaithful, Pretty woman walking past barbershop from The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, Laury Ferguson from The Angels with Dirty Faces, Goldie from They Made Me a Criminal, Lt. Catherine Gates from I Was a Male War Bride, Nora Bayes from Shine on Harvest Moon, and Amanda from The Opposite Sex.
Nominated for: Sheridan was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1942 for The Man Who Came to Dinner, in which she acts like a 1940s version of Jenna Maroney.
Reasons: Despite her undeniable talent and versatility, she was seen as a sex symbol due to her pin-up days in the 1940s. Also, her career was in decline in the 1950s. Still, she had to fight to be taken seriously by Hollywood.
Trivia: Was called, “The Oomph Girl,” a nickname she loathed during her 1940s pin-up days. Said to receive 250 marriage proposals in a single week. Was a heroine of a 1943 novel that was probably aimed at teenage girls.

190. Billie Burke

Though there were actually 2 good witches in the L. Frank Baum source material, The Wizard of Oz writers decided to combine the two as Glinda, the Good Witch of the North and played by Billie Burke. Yet, when you watch the movie, this merge tends to have unfortunate implications regarding Glinda.

Though there were actually 2 good witches in the L. Frank Baum source material, The Wizard of Oz writers decided to combine the two as Glinda, the Good Witch of the North and played by Billie Burke. Yet, when you watch the movie, this merge tends to have unfortunate implications regarding Glinda.

Personal Life: (1884-1970) Born Mary William Ethelbert Appleton Burke in Washington D. C. Father was a singer and clown who worked for Barnum & Bailey Circus. Grew up in London and made her stage debut in 1903 but eventually returned to the US to conquer Broadway. Made her first film in 1915. Married to Florenz Ziegfeld and had a daughter Patricia. Retired in 1960 due to failing memory and trouble remembering her lines. Died of natural causes at 85.
Famous for: American actress acclaimed and famous on Broadway and early silent film with a career spanning 57 years from the early 1900s to the 1960s. Best known as Glinda from The Wizard of Oz. Voice was unique in intonation, which she accentuated in her later character roles as dim-witted, spoiled society types. Notable roles are Peggy Cameron from Peggy, Margaret from A Bill of Divorcement, Millicent Jordan from Dinner at Eight, Mrs. Topper from Topper and other films, Mrs. Kilbourne from Merrily We Live, Marmy Carleton from The Young in Heart, Clara from Parnell, Glinda from The Wizard of Oz, Mrs. Ernest Stanley from The Man Who Came to Dinner, Mrs. Rowland from Girl Crazy, Mrs. Livingston Belney from The Barkleys of Broadway, and Doris Dunstan from Father of the Bride and Father’s Little Dividend.
Nominated for: Burke was nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1938 for Merrily We Live.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1939 for The Wizard of Oz.
Reasons: She was just burned by the competition when she was nominated. Still, she was also typecast as dim-witted spoiled society types in her later years. Not to mention, she was always seen as Glinda from The Wizard of Oz.
Trivia: Wrote 2 autobiographies. Had her own show on radio and TV.

Movie Stars Who Have Never Won an Oscar: Part 18 – Frank Morgan to Paul Robeson

Most Americans know Conrad Veidt as the Nazi officer Major Strasser from Casablanca. Yet, not many know that he fled Nazi Germany for Great Britain during the rise of Adolf Hitler because he had a Jewish wife.

Most Americans know Conrad Veidt as the Nazi officer Major Strasser from Casablanca. Yet, not many know that he fled Nazi Germany for Great Britain during the rise of Adolf Hitler because he had a Jewish wife.

Now while I did put some stars from the silent era, I only focused on ones who appeared on sound pictures. Yet the reason for this is that there were no Oscars awarded during the Silent Era and that many of the silent stars didn’t transition to sound either. And there were even some like Rudolph Valentino who were dead by the time The Jazz Singer came out in the late 1920s. Sure silent movies may have dialogue cards instead of subtitles yet for awhile, it was quite an art form in the 1920s with films ranging from silent epics, German expressionist pieces, and comedies by Harold Lloyd, Buster Keaton, and Charlie Chaplin. And then there’s D. W. Griffith’s Birth of a Nation, which should only be seen for its artistic merits and only for required viewing, because it’s so racist that it makes Gone With the Wind look like Glory in comparison. In this selection, I bring you 10 more actors and actresses who have never received a competitive Academy Award. First, we have Frank Morgan who’s best known as the not so wonderful Wizard of Oz. Second, is German actor Conrad Veidt whose career spanned from playing German horror villains to Nazis followed by African American entertainment legend and blacklisted civil rights activist Paul Robeson. Third, comes Mae West who was the master of the double entendre and whose scandal ridden public life put Madonna to shame. Then we have Jill Clayburgh whose career spanned 40 years and is best remembered by my generation for playing Kristen Wiig’s mom on Bridesmaids. After that is Jack Hawkins who appeared in films like Ben Hur and The Bridge on the River Kwai yet his career and life was hurt by smoking followed by Indian actor Sabu best known for playing Mowgli yet suffered a case from typecasting after WWII. Then there’s Irish acting legend David Kelly who was Charlie’s grandpa as well as the most recognizable voices from stage and screen as well as Scottish actor Ian Bannen who was nominated for an Oscar before Sean Connery. And last but not least, is June Allyson whose career in Hollywood was of the girl next door but in later years was the spokeswoman for Depends. So for your reading pleasure, here are 10 more Oscar less actors and actresses I’ve listed in this installment.

171. Frank Morgan

While Frank Morgan is best known as the Wizard of Oz from the eponymous 1939 film, it was just one of the 5 roles he played in the movie. He also portrayed Professor Marvel, a Doorman, Cabbie, and Guard.

While Frank Morgan is best known as the Wizard of Oz from the eponymous 1939 film, it was just one of the 5 roles he played in the movie. He also portrayed Professor Marvel, a Doorman, Cabbie, and Guard.

Personal Life: (1890-1949) Born Francis Phillip Wuppermann in New York City. Father was a Venezuelan born German immigrant of Spanish and German descent. Youngest of 11 children. Family earned its wealth through distributing Angostura bitters. Attended Cornell University before following his brother to the Broadway stage who was Ralph Morgan. Made his first film in 1916. Married to Alma Muller for 35 years and had a son. Was widely known to have a drinking problem and would carry briefcase to work fully equipped with a small mini bar. Died of a heart attack at 59.
Famous for: American character actor best known for playing the Wizard of Oz. Notable roles are Mayor John Hastings from Hallelujah I’m a Bum, Alessandro – Duke of Florence from The Affairs of Cellini, Mellersh Wilkins from Enchanted April, Jesse Kiffmeyer from Saratoga, Professor Marvel / The Wizard of Oz / The Gatekeeper / The Carriage Driver / The Guard from The Wizard of Oz, Professor Roth from The Mortal Storm, The Pirate from Tortilla Flat, Willie Grogan from The Human Comedy, Hugo Matuschek from The Shop Around the Corner, King Louis XIII from The Three Musketeers, Fire Chief Duggan from Key to the City.
Nominated for: Morgan was nominated twice once for Best Actor and once for Best Supporting Actor in 1935 for The Affairs of Cellini and in 1943 for Tortilla Flat.
Most Crushing Loss: Losing to Van Heflin in the 1943 Best Supporting Actor race. Seriously, his role as the Mexican guy with the dogs is the only reason why that movie is still watchable. Not to mention, he had a Hispanic grandmother. Still, he should’ve at least lost to Walter Huston or Henry Travers since people still watch Yankee Doodle Dandy and Mrs. Miniver.
Reasons: He was more likely burned by the competition than anything. Also, possibly being Latino on his paternal grandmother’s side (the first Hispanic to win an acting Oscar was Anthony Quinn in 1952 for Viva Zapata!).
Trivia: Starred in a play written by his brother who died in 1919 during his duty in the Army of Occupation.

172. Conrad Veidt

Before fleeing with his German wife to the UK, Conrad Veidt was already a prolific actor in the German film industry as well as international recognition. This goes especially true for his silent film roles. His character from The Man Who Laughs was an inspiration for the Joker.

Before fleeing with his Jewish wife to the UK, Conrad Veidt was already a prolific actor in the German film industry as well as international recognition. This goes especially true for his silent film roles. His character from The Man Who Laughs was an inspiration for the Joker.

Personal Life: (1893-1943) Born Hans Walter Conrad Veidt in Berlin. Conscripted and rose to a non-commissioned officer in WWI on the Eastern Front in 1915. But was out a year later due to jaundice which didn’t improve. Yet, this led the army to let him join the theater and entertain the troops. Was discharged in 1917 after being deemed unfit for service. Made his first movie in 1917. Married 3 times and had a daughter with second wife Felicitas Radke. Left Germany for Britain in 1933 during the rise of Nazism due to his third wife being Jewish. Became a British citizen in 1938 but moved to the US in 1941. Died of a massive heart attack while playing golf in Los Angeles at 50.
Famous for: German-British actor who started in German Expressionist silent films and was once the best paid stars at Ufa in the early 1930s. Appeared in well over 100 films and usually played villains, especially in his later career. Notable roles are Caesare from The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Orlac from The Hands of Orlac, Gwynplaine / Lord Clancharlie from The Man Who Laughs, Ivan the Terrible from Waxworks, Jaffar from The Thief of Bagdad, Otto Becker / Baron Hugo Von Detner from Nazi Agent, Major Heinrich Strasser from Casablanca, and Hassert Seidel from Above Suspicion.
Nominated for: Veidt was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1942 for Casablanca.
Reasons: Let’s face it. Veidt was a German actor whose most memorable work up to Casablanca was in German Expressionist silent films. And most of these were horror movies.
Trivia: Vehemently opposed the Nazi regime and fled Germany to Britain because his third wife was Jewish. Donated much of his fortune to assist the British war effort during WWII as well as his life savings before he left for the US. Loved animals, fast cars, gardening, and pastries. Face from The Man Who Laughs was an inspiration for the Joker from Batman and his character on The Thief of Baghdad for Jafar in Disney’s Aladdin. Starred in the first pro-gay rights film.

173. Mae West

Mae West might've been in her 40s when she appeared in her first film but her sexually suggestive language would get her in a lot of trouble with the moral police of the 1930s. One of her famous quotes is: "When I'm good, I'm very good. When I'm bad, I'm better."

Mae West might’ve been in her 40s when she appeared in her first film but her sexually suggestive language would get her in a lot of trouble with the moral police of the 1930s. One of her famous quotes is: “When I’m good, I’m very good. When I’m bad, I’m better.”

Personal Life: (1893-1980) Born Mary Jane West in Brooklyn, New York City. Father was a prizefighter known as “Battlin’ Jack West” who later worked as a “special policeman”, and later had his own private investigations agency. Mother was a corset and fashion model who was supportive of her career unlike some of her family members for obvious reasons. Got her start in amateur shows at 7 and won prizes in local talent contests. Began performing professionally for the Hal Clarendon Stock Company in 1907 at 14. Debuted on Broadway in 1911. Made her first film in 1932. Married to Frank Szatkus for 31 years but it’s doubtful whether they even living together as husband and wife before their divorce (yet she had many boyfriends). Died from a couple strokes and a bout of pneumonia at 87.
Famous for: American actress, singer, playwright, and screenwriter whose entertainment career spanned 7 decades. Master of bawdy double entendres. Notable roles are Maudie Triplett from Night After Night, Lady Lou from She Done Him Wrong, Tira from I’m No Angel, Ruby Carter from Belle of the Nineties, Peaches O’Day from Every Day’s a Holiday, Flower Belle Lee from My Little Chickadee, and Leticia Van Allen from Myra Beckinridge.
Nominated for: West was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not earning an honorary Oscar for her career and contributions to movies and comedy in general.
Reasons: For one, West was a comedy star as well as a sex symbol. Second, she encountered a lot of problems in her day like censorship and her glory days in Hollywood were over by then (and she was also banned from NBC radio for her Adam and Eve sketch with Don Ameche, which was deemed “vulgar and indecent” by the FCC. Oh, and she served 8 days in prison for “corrupting the morals of youth” over her play Sex). Not to mention, her personal life was basically tabloid fodder throughout her life, even as a senior citizen. In short, she was basically a combination of Bette Midler and Madonna of her day.
Trivia: Early supporter of gay rights and feminism (though never said she was a feminist). Recorded 3 rock albums in the late 1960s. Wrote plays under the pen name Jane Mast. Performed “Baby It’s Cold Outside” with Rock Hudson at the 1958 Academy Awards telecast. When approached for permission to allow her likeness on the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album cover, she initially refused, asking “What would I be doing in a Lonely Heart’s Club”. The Beatles wrote her a personal letter declaring themselves great admirers of the star and persuaded her to change her mind. Also has her name linked to vocabulary: WWII Allied aircrews called their yellow inflatable, vest-like life jackets “Mae Wests” partly from rhyming slang for “breasts” and “life vest” and partly because of the resemblance to her torso. A “Mae West” is also a type of round parachute malfunction (partial inversion) which contorts the shape of the canopy into the appearance of an extraordinarily large brassiere. Also, graph depicting the probability of uranium or other fissionable materials producing specific fission products has two peaks with a “valley” in the middle, and is known as the Mae West curve.

174. Jack Hawkins

Though his career spanned between the 1930s to 1970s, Jack Hawkins was a 3-pack-a-day smoker who would later develop voice problems (and possibly cancer) in his later years and would soon have his larynx removed. Yet, he continued to smoke despite losing his voice until his death.

Though his career spanned between the 1930s to 1970s, Jack Hawkins was a 3-pack-a-day smoker who would later develop voice problems (and possibly cancer) in his later years and would soon have his larynx removed. Yet, he continued to smoke despite losing his voice until his death.

Personal Life: (1910-1973) Born in London. Father was a builder. Made his stage debut at 12 and Broadway debut at 18. Made first film in 1930. Served in WWII and rose to the rank of colonel in the British Army with the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Married twice with first wife being Jessica Tandy which produced one child. Married to second wife Doreen Lawrence for 26 years and had 3 children with her. Smoked 3 packs a day and began experiencing voice problems in the late 1950s. Underwent cobalt treatment in 1959 for what might have been cancer of the larynx and used a mechanical one to aid his speech. Diagnosed with throat cancer in 1965 and his larynx was removed the following year that his films after that were dubbed. Died of cancer during an operation to insert an artificial voice box at 62.
Famous for: British actor whose career spanned from the 1930s to 1970s. Usually played sympathetic authority figures. Notable roles are Detective Ames from The Fallen Idol, Lord George Murray from Bonnie Prince Charlie, Tristram Griffin from The Black Rose, the Interrogator from The Prisoner, Major Warden from The Bridge on the River Kwai, Quintus Arrius from Ben-Hur, Hyde from The League of Gentlemen, General Cornwallis from Lafayette, General Allenby from Lawrence of Arabia, Marlow from Lord Jim, Otto Witt from Zulu, General Sir Thomas Picton from Waterloo, Pharaoh Khufu from Land of the Pharaohs, and Mr. Welldon from Young Winston.
Nominated for: Hawkins was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1957 for The Bridge on the River Kwai. Sending William Holden back just makes you hate him.
Reasons: Well, Hawkins is far more famous in Britain as well as made most of his films there. Also, he was starting to lose his voice by The Bridge on the River Kwai due to smoking too many cigarettes (and never quitting).
Trivia: Despite his conservative screen image, was a political liberal. Was friends with Sir Alec Guinness. Appeared in 3 Best Picture winners.

175. Jill Clayburgh

Jill Clayburgh was nominated for Best Actress in 2 films such as An Unmarried Woman seen here. Yet, most people my age would remember her as the mom from Bridesmaids the last movie she made before succumbing to  chronic lymphocytic leukemia, which she had for over 20 years.

Jill Clayburgh was nominated for Best Actress in 2 films such as An Unmarried Woman seen here. Yet, most people my age would remember her as the mom from Bridesmaids the last movie she made before succumbing to chronic lymphocytic leukemia, which she had for over 20 years.

Personal Life: (1944-2010) Born in New York City. Mother was an actress and theatrical production secretary for producer David Merrick. Father was a manufacturing executive. Attended Sarah Lawrence College and joined the Charles Street Repertory Theater in Boston. Made her Broadway debut in 1968 and her first film in 1969 (or 1963). Married to writer David Rabe for 31 years and had 2 children. Had chronic lymphocytic leukemia for more than 20 years which killed her in Salisbury, Connecticut at 66.
Famous for: American actress whose career spanned over 40 years. Notable roles are Josephine from The Wedding Party, Naomi from Portnoy’s Complaint, Jackie from The Thief Who Came to Dinner, Angela Black from The Terminal Man, Carole Lombard from Gable and Lombard, Hilly Burns from Silver Streak, Erica from An Unmarried Woman, Caterina Silveri from La Luna, Marilyn Holmberg from Starting Over, Ruth Loomis from First Monday in October, Nan Whitman from Fools Rush In, Agnes Finch from Running with Scissors, Mrs. Randall from Love & Other Drugs, and Judy Walker from Bridesmaids.
Nominated for: Clayburgh was nominated twice for Best Actress in 1978 for An Unmarried Woman and 1979 for Starting Over.
Most Crushing Loss: Losing to Jane Fonda in 1978. Sure Fonda’s a decent actress but Coming Home seems like obvious Oscar bait, you know love triangle between Vietnam vets, one of whom is paralyzed. She should’ve at least lost to Geraldine Page.
Reasons: For one, she was burned by the competition. Second, she didn’t have the name recognition her fellow nominees had.
Trivia: Romantically linked to Al Pacino. Grandmother was an opera singer. Won the Best Actress Award at the 1978 Cannes Film Festival. Starred in Dirty Sexy Money for 2 years.

176. Ian Bannen

Though I know Ian Bannen from his later roles such as in Waking Ned Devine and Greenfingers, he had a long career as a supporting player and occasional leading man.

Though I know Ian Bannen from his later roles such as in Waking Ned Devine and Hope and Glory, he had a long career as a supporting player and occasional leading man.

Personal Life: (1928-1999) Born in Airdrie, Lanarkshire in Scotland. Father was a lawyer. Served in the British Army. Made acting debut in 1947. Made his first film in 1951. Married to Marilyn Salisbury for 23 years. Died in a car accident at Loch Ness at 71 (which his wife was responsible for).
Famous for: Scottish character actor and occasional leading man. Notable roles are Gabelle from A Tale of Two Cities, Crow from The Flight of the Phoenix, Godliman from Eye of the Needle, Senior Police Officer from Gandhi, Riley Wyndham from The Prodigal, Grandfather George from Hope and Glory, Matt Mason from Crossing the Line, Robert Bruce Sr. from Braveheart, and Jackie O’Shea from Waking Ned Devine.
Nominated for: Bannen was nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1966 for The Flight of the Phoenix.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1987 for Hope and Glory.
Reasons: Bannen was primarily a British actor who primarily appeared in British films whom most Americans are unfamiliar with.
Trivia: Appeared in 2 Best Picture winners. First Scottish actor nominated for an Oscar.

177. June Allyson

June Allyson was the kind actress who entertained a generation with her "girl next door" image from the 1930s to the 1950s after spending a rough childhood in the Bronx. Yet, she would spend her later years in commercials trying to get old people to buy adult diapers.

June Allyson was the kind actress who entertained a generation with her “girl next door” image from the 1930s to the 1950s after spending a rough childhood in the Bronx. Yet, she would spend her later years in commercials trying to get old people to buy adult diapers.

Personal Life: (1917-2006) Born Eleanor Geisman in The Bronx, New York City. Father was an alcoholic janitor who abandoned the family when she was only 6 months old. Mother was a telephone operator and restaurant cashier. Grew up in near poverty, raised by her maternal grandparents and other relatives. At 8, she was involved in an accident when a tree branch fell on her while riding her tricycle, injuring her back and skull but killing her pet terrier. Was confined to a heavy steel brace as well as wheelchairs, braces, and crutches. Yet, she regained her health and enrolled in dancing school and competitions under “Elaine Peters” despite being told by doctors that she’d never walk again. After her stepfather’s death, she dropped out of high school at 16 even though she initially wanted to be a doctor and thought acting would pay the bills for medical school. Worked a stint as a tap dancer at a Montreal nightclub and was an actress in short subject films for Educational Pictures. Was even a before girl in a swimsuit magazine ad as well as did Vitaphone musical shorts in Brooklyn and worked for the Copacobana. Debuted on Broadway in 1943 and in Hollywood in 1943. Married 4 times (twice to the same man) with her first husband being Dick Powell with whom she had 2 children. Married to David Ashrow for 30 years. Struggled with alcoholism in the 1970s. Had hip replacement surgery in 2003. Died in Ojai of pulmonary respiratory failure and acute bronchitis at 88.
Famous for: American actress, singer, and dancer whose “girl next door” image made her a star in films during the 1940s and 1950s. Career spanned 75 years. Notable roles are Ethel from Best Foot Forward, Patsy Deyo from Two Girls and a Sailor, Leslie Odell from Her Highness and the Bellboy, Connie Lane from Good News, Constance Bonacieux from The Three Musketeers, Martha Terryton from The Bride Goes Wild, Josephine “Jo” March from Little Women, Cynthia Potter from Too Young to Kiss, Dr. Emily Barringer from The Girl in White, Helen Burger Miller from The Glenn Miller Story, Mary Blemond Walling from Executive Suite, Sally Holland from Strategic Air Command, Pearl “Butch” Brown from The McConnell Story, Kay Hillard from The Opposite Sex, and Helen Banning from Interlude.
Nominated for: Allyson was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not receiving an honorary Oscar for her career or at least the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award for her work in promoting awareness for championing the importance of research in urological and gynecological diseases in seniors.
Reasons: For one, she was typecast as the wholesome girl next door and was mainly cast in comedies and musicals (or anything appealing to people under 30). Second, Louis B. Mayer tried to ship her with Van Johnson but ended up marrying Dick Powell to his consternation (but at least he was happy she wanted him to give her away). Third, after Powell’s death she was involved in a bitter custody battle with her mother because she named her boyfriend at the time as her children’s legal guardian.
Trivia: Established the June Allyson Foundation for Public Awareness and Medical Research and worked to raise money for research for urological and gynecological diseases affecting senior citizens. Was a spokeswoman for Depends. Never mastered reading music. Hosted and starred in her own TV anthology series. Romantically linked to Peter Lawford and John F. Kennedy. Friends with Jimmy Stewart, Judy Garland, and the Reagans. Was appointed her to the Federal Council on Aging by Ronald Reagan during the 1980s.

178. Sabu Dastagir

Discovered by documentary pioneer Robert Flaherty, Sabu Dastagir was one of the first Indian actors to achieve success in Hollywood during the 1930s and 1940s. Also was a decorated war hero but that didn't help him get parts after WWII.

Discovered by documentary pioneer Robert Flaherty, Sabu Dastagir was one of the first Indian actors to achieve success in Hollywood during the 1930s and 1940s. Also was a decorated war hero but that didn’t help him get parts after WWII.

Personal Life: (1924-1963) Born in Karapur, Mysore in British India. Father was an elephant driver. Was discovered by documentarian Robert Flaherty who gave him his first acting gig. Became a US citizen in 1944. Joined the US Army Air Forces, serving as a tail gunner and ball turret gunner on B-24 Liberators as well as flew on several missions in the Pacific. Married to Marilyn Cooper for 15 years and had 2 children. Died of a heart attack at 39.
Famous for: British Indian-American actor who was known primarily for his work in British and American films during the 1930s and 1940s. Notable roles are Toomai from The Elephant Boy, Abu from The Thief of Baghdad, Mowgli from The Jungle Book, The Young General from Black Narcissus, Manoel from The End of the River, Ali Ben Ali from Arabian Nights, Talib from Rampage, and Ram Singh from A Tiger Walks.
Nominated for: Sabu was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1947 for Black Narcissus. What’s even more crushing is that this was probably his best film in which he’s portrayed as a three dimensional character and there aren’t a lot of people in the US who know it exists save maybe TCM fans.
Reasons: He was an Indian actor who was raised Muslim. Also was subject to a paternity suit and his career declined after WWII that he had to appear in a circus elephant act at one point. Not to mention, he was often typecast into stereotypical roles and had limited opportunity in Hollywood and British films, especially during the Hays Code. He should’ve went back to India for at least he’d get steady work in Bollywood. But he’d left that country far behind him by then.
Trivia: Awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for his valor and bravery during WWII. Son was a 1980s rock musician. Co-owned a furniture store with his brother.

179. David Kelly

David Kelly might be known as Grandpa Joe from Tim Burton's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, but he's one of the most recognizable voices in his native Ireland who's been in the limelight since the 1950s.

David Kelly might be known as Grandpa Joe from Tim Burton’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, but he’s one of the most recognizable voices in his native Ireland who’s been in the limelight since the 1950s.

Personal Life: (1929-2012) Born in Dublin, Ireland. Began acting at 8 at the Gaiety Theatre and attended The Abbey School of Acting. Made his first film in 1958. Married to Laurie Morton for 51 years and had 2 children. Died after a short illness at 82.
Famous for: Irish actor and one of the most recognizable voices on stage and screen in that country. Notable roles are O’Brien from Young Cassidy, Garrett Deasy from Ulysses, Vicar from The Italian Job, Grandfather Reilly from Into the West, Michael O’Sullivan from Waking Ned Devine, Fergus Wilks from Greenfingers, and Grandpa Joe from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.
Nominated for: Kelly was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 2000 for Greenfingers.
Reasons: Kelly was primarily an Irish actor who mostly appeared in British and Irish media.
Trivia: Was trained in drafting, calligraphy, and watercolor.

180. Paul Robeson

Aside from his work as the man who sang, "Old Man River" and played Othello on Broadway, Paul Robeson was also a football All-American and class valedictorian at Rutgers as well as received an LL.B. from Columbia Law School.

Aside from his work as the man who sang, “Old Man River” and played Othello on Broadway, Paul Robeson was also a football All-American and class valedictorian at Rutgers as well as received an LL.B. from Columbia Law School.

Personal Life: (1898-1976) Born in Princeton, New Jersey. Father was a Presbyterian minister, yet was forced to resign his church position in 1901 after a disagreement with white backers that contained apparent racial undertones and was stuck doing menial jobs until he found another church to work at in 1910. Mother was nearly blind and died in a house fire when he was 6. Worked a summer job as a waiter in Rhode Island after graduation. Attended Rutgers on a full scholarship and went on to Columbia Law School. Supported himself as a professional football player, coach, and singer. Tried to practice law but racism prevented that. Made his theatrical debut in the 1920s and his film debut in 1924. Married to Eslanda Goode for 44 years and had a son. Retired due to health problems in 1963. Died of stroke complications in Philadelphia at 77.
Famous for: American actor and singer and one of the most influential black pioneers of music and cinema. Notable roles are Reverend Isaiah T. Jenkins / His brother Sylvester from Body and Soul, John Zinga from Song of Freedom, Joe from Showboat, King Umpoba from King Solomon’s Mines, David Goliath from The Proud Valley, and Luke from Tales of Manhattan.
Nominated for: Robeson was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not receiving an honorary Oscar for his achievements in film as well as being a pioneer for African Americans in cinema.
Reasons: Other than being black and having limited acting opportunities in Hollywood in general, Robeson was a civil rights activist who was an advocate for anti-imperialism, as well affiliated with Communism and a bit too friendly with the Soviets. This led to him being investigated by the FBI during the Red Scare and because he didn’t recant his income and passport were taken away from him. He was also blacklisted for 3 years. And while it was restored in 1958, his health would later break down that he had to retire in 1963 and spend the rest of his life in seclusion.
Trivia: Was an outstanding football player at Rutgers being an All-American. Also graduated from Rutgers as valedictorian. Would take over for his father during sermons when he was called away as a teenager. Befriended Fritz Pollard who was the first African American NFL football coach. Had an affair with Peggy Ashcroft during his time on Othello on Broadway. Involved in the Civil Rights Movement.

Movie Stars Who Have Never Won an Oscar: Part 17 – Romy Schneider to Canada Lee

Anna May Wong was the first Chinese American movie star at a time when people thought Chinese people couldn't be Americans. Here is her in the 1922 film The Toll of the Sea which was one of the first color films and made her a star.

Anna May Wong was the first Chinese American movie star at a time when people thought Chinese people couldn’t be Americans. Here is her in the 1922 film The Toll of the Sea which was one of the first color films and made her a star as well as one of the few romance films that featured an interracial couple. The plot goes similarly along with Madame Butterfly.

During the first half of the 20th century to the early 1960s, most movies were made in black and white which has led many to think that the filmmakers didn’t have the technology to make color movies. However, this is a myth since there were quite a few movies made in color but the process was expensive and time consuming that most filmmakers just didn’t bother. And sometimes the colorization was just partial and didn’t look realistic in any way (though as long as the colorization is consistent with artistic vision, I’m not against this). However, such myths gave rise to the idea of colorization of classic black and white films in the 1980s and early 1990s courtesy of Ted Turner, which many people thought would introduce old movies to a new audience. Yet, to me and a lot of detractors, it’s just wrong. Seriously, even if making a film in color back in the day wouldn’t make sense in the finance scheme as well as be quite exhausting, if the filmmakers wanted their black and white films made in color, they would’ve done it. To colorize Casablanca would be just a travesty as doing the same to Schindler’s List for God’s sake. And if you want to know why colorization is a bad idea, here’s something by Roger Ebert http://www.rogerebert.com/interviews/casablanca-gets-colorized-but-dont-play-it-again-ted. In this selection, I bring you 10 more legends from those past Hollywood days when black and white movies were mostly produced. First, we have Austrian actress Romy Schneider best known for her European films and the Sissi Trilogy. Second, there are African American performers Juanita Moore who was nominated for Best Supporting Actress for Imitation of Life and Canada Lee who should’ve had his big break as a leading man in Cry, the Beloved Country, but was blacklisted instead. After them, is Chinese American actress Anna May Wong who was a celebrated actress and fashion icon, but because of certain rules in the Hays Code (or racism), wasn’t allowed to play the part of O-Lan from The Good Earth because the guy cast as her husband was white and a European actress was cast in the role instead. Then, you have Telly Savalas best known for his bald head and Kojak as well as Italian actor Vincent Gardenia who’s best remembered as Archie Bunker’s neighbor Frank Lorenzo. Next, comes Mexican actress Katy Juardo who’s known for appearing in westerns as well as was married for a time to Ernest Borgnine followed by Italian Pier Angeli who was better known for her relationships with James Dean and Vic Damone. After them, there’s Greek actress Irene Papas who appeared in 70 films for over 50 years but she was an unconventional beauty with a thick accent. And finally, there’s British 1960s sensation Sir Alan Bates. So without further adieu, here are 10 more actors and actresses who never got to make their Oscar speech during their careers.

161. Romy Schneider

Romy Schneider is best known for her role as 19th Empress Consort Elisabeth of Austria from the Sissi Trilogy. Basically this Trilogy basically consists of making Empress Elisabeth's life pretty much like a Disney Princess movie, which it certainly wasn't.

Romy Schneider is best known for her role as 19th Empress Consort Elisabeth of Austria from the Sissi Trilogy. Basically this Trilogy basically consists of making Empress Elisabeth’s life pretty much like a Disney Princess movie, which it certainly wasn’t.

Personal Life: (1938-1982) Born Rosemarie Magdalena Albach in Nazi-era Vienna, Austria. Parents divorced in 1945 and mother remarried a restauranteur who might’ve had an unhealthy interest in her. Made her first film at 15. Was engaged to Alain Delon. Married twice and had 2 children. Son from first marriage died in an accident in attempting to climb a spiked fence at his stepfather’s home puncturing his femoral artery in the process at 14. Drank excessively after that (though may not have around the time of her death). Was found dead in her Paris apartment at 43 (officially ruled as a cardiac arrest).
Famous for: Austrian-German and French actress who made successful and critically acclaimed films of the 1950s and 1960s. Notable roles are Princess/Queen Victoria from Victoria in Dover, Niddy Hoevelmann from The Last Man, Sissi/Empress Elizabeth of Austria from the Sissi Trilogy and Ludwig, Anne-Claire Jouvain from Love from Paris, Nicole from Eva, Christine Weiring from Christine, Katia from Magnificent Sinner, Leni from The Trial, Regine from The Victors, Carole Werner from What’s New Pussycat?, Francesca Anderson from My Lover My Son, Gita Samuels from The Assassination of Trotsky, Anna Kupfer from Le Train, Helene from Mado, Marie from A Simple Story, Hélène Martin from Bloodline, Katherine Mortenhoe from Death Watch, and Emma Eckhert from La Banquière.
Nominated for: Schneider was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actress in 1963 for The Cardinal.
Reasons: Schneider was a European actress much more iconic in France and Austria than Hollywood.
Trivia: The Prix Romy Schneider; this prize—the most prestigious award for promising actresses in the French film industry—is awarded by a jury each year in Paris was named after her. Austrian newspaper has a TV award named after her, too.

162. Juanita Moore

Juanita Moore was the 5th African American to be nominated for an Academy Award as well as the third for Best Supporting Actress at a time when only a single African American had won the Oscar. She's most famous in Imitation of Life.

Juanita Moore was the 5th African American to be nominated for an Academy Award as well as the third for Best Supporting Actress at a time when only a single African American had won the Oscar. She’s most famous in Imitation of Life.

Personal Life: (1914-2014) Born in Greenwood, Mississippi and raised in Los Angeles. Was a chorus girl at the Cotton Club while working in theater. Married for 50 years to Charles Burris and had at least one daughter. Retired in 2001. Died of natural causes at 99.
Famous for: American actress whose career spanned 59 years. Fifth African American to be nominated for an Academy Award in any category, and the third in the Supporting Actress category at a time when only a single African American had won an Oscar. Started out as an extra and played bit parts before her first big break in the 1940s. Notable roles are Nurse from Pinky, Nightclub Patron / Churchgoer from Cabin in the Sky, Dominique from Affair in Trinidad, Hilda from The Girl Can’t Help It, Lacy – Backstage Maid from The Helen Morgan Story, Annie Johnson from Imitation of Life, Julius’ Mother from A Child Is Waiting, Nurse from Rosie!, Viney from Skin Game, Hattie Fox from Fox Style, and Kenny’s Grandmother from The Kid.
Nominated for: Moore was nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1959 for Imitation of Life.
Most Crushing Loss: Losing to Shelley Winters in 1959. Sure Winters was in The Diary of Anne Frank and isn’t either abused or abusive in any way. Yet, what’s more crushing is that Moore loss might’ve had nothing to do with her talents. In fact, she might’ve received the lowest vote count.
Reasons: If you were an African American actress in the 1950s, even if you were nominated for an Oscar, the chances of winning were slim (since it was during Jim Crow and segregation so it’s racism, folks). Also was confined to few roles due to the Hays Code and racism in general.
Trivia: Co-founded a theater troupe now headed by her grandson.

163. Anna May Wong

Anna May Wong was the first Chinese American movie star as well as the first Asian American to gain international fame. But as the Western film world was, she was only confined to play supporting players stereotyped as the demure

Anna May Wong was the first Chinese American movie star as well as the first Asian American to gain international fame. But as the Western film world was, she was only confined to play supporting players stereotyped as the demure “Butterfy” or “Dragon Lady.” Also, MGM refused to cast her as the Chinese O-Lan solely because Paul Muni was cast as the male lead.

Personal Life: (1905-1961) Born Wong Liu Tsong in Los Angeles to second-generation Cantonese American parents. Worked at Ville de Paris department store. Made her first film at 16 and dropped out of high school (to the chagrin of her parents but they later came to accept her career in show business since her father wrote an article expressing pride in his famous daughter in the 1930s). Suffered bouts of depression and sudden anger as well as practiced excessive smoking and drinking. Had relationships with Caucasian men since Chinese looked down actresses as prostitutes. Mother died in a car accident in 1931. Suffered an internal hemorrhage in 1953. Died of a heart attack at 56.
Famous for: American actress who became the first Chinese American movie star and the first Asian American to gain international recognition. Long and varied career spanned both silent and sound film (in the US and Europe), stage, radio, and television. Notable roles are Lotus Blossom from The Toll of the Sea, Mongol Slave from The Thief of Baghdad, Shosho from Piccadilly, Princess Ling Moy from Daughter of the Dragon, Hui Fei from Shanghai Express, Lan Ying from Dangerous to Know, Kwan Mei from Lady of Chungking, Su Lin from Impact, and Tawny from Portrait in Black.
Nominated for: Wong was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Other than not being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1932 for Shanghai Express (since the award didn’t exist), I would say her most crushing loss wasn’t receiving an honorary Oscar from the Academy for being one of the first Asian American stars in Hollywood.
Reasons: For one, Wong was Asian, which basically limited her range of roles she could play like supporting roles as demure butterflies or stereotypical dragon ladies, which caused her a lot of frustration that she fled to Europe for a time. State anti-miscegenation laws (i.e. racism) prevented her from playing leads and she was usually passed over in favor of a white actress (even if the character was Asian). One notorious example of this was when MGM refused to consider her for the part of O-Lan for The Good Earth which went to German actress Luise Rainer. All because the main male character was played by Paul Muni and that the Hays Code had a rules against miscegenation, making this one of the most notorious casting disputes in movie history. Also, was less well received in China after Shanghai Express that they were also against her getting the part of O-Lan as well. And when she did portray Chinese characters in a positive light, they were for B-movies. Not to mention, many people thought at the time that it was impossible to be Chinese and American (even though she was a native born US citizen). Also, she died too early to receive an honorary Oscar.
Trivia: Real name means “yellow snow frost.” Friends with Marlene Dietrich and Leni Riefenstahl. Received an honorary doctorate from Peking University in 1932. Supported China during the Second Sino-Japanese War and made a series of anti-Japanese propaganda films during WWII. Starred in The Gallery of Madame Liu-Tsong in 1951-1952 under her real name which was the first US TV show to have an Asian lead. Was an outspoken activist in Chinese American causes and better film roles. Went on a tour of China for a year during the 1930s and chronicled her experiences in the New York Herald Tribune. Fluent in German and French. Wrote a cookbook called New Chinese Recipes in 1942. Converted her Santa Monica Home to “Moongate Apartments.” Hosted on of the first documentaries on China narrated by a Chinese American. Starred in one of the first color features.

164. Telly Savalas

Though best known as Kojak, Telly Savalas had a career that spanned 4 decades and appeared in movies like Birdman of Alcatraz, Cape Fear, The Dirty Dozen, and Kelly's Heroes. Also started shaving his head when he played Pontius Pilate in The Greatest Story Ever Told.

Though best known as Kojak, Telly Savalas had a career that spanned 4 decades and appeared in movies like Birdman of Alcatraz, Cape Fear, The Dirty Dozen, and Kelly’s Heroes. Also started shaving his head when he played Pontius Pilate in The Greatest Story Ever Told.

Personal Life: (1922-1994) Born in Garden City, New York to Greek immigrants. Father was a Greek restaurant owner while mother was an artist. Spoke only Greek before he entered grade school. Worked as a lifeguard until he unsuccessfully tried to save a man from drowning which haunted him for the rest of his life. Graduated from Columbia University in 1948 with a degree in psychology. Served 3 years in the US Army during WWII by working in the State Department and later ABC News. Began his acting career in 1950 and started in radio and television. Married 3 times and had 6 children. Died of bladder and prostate cancer at 72.
Famous for: American actor and singer whose career spanned 4 decades. Notable roles are
Detective Lt. Gunderson from The Young Savages, Private Detective Charles Sievers from Cape Fear, Feto Gomez from Birdman of Alcatraz, Pontius Pilate from The Greatest Story Ever Told, Sgt. Guffy from Battle of the Bulge, Sgt. Maj. Dagineau from Beau Geste, Archer Maggott from The Dirty Dozen, MSgt. Big Joe from Kelly’s Heroes, Captain Sam Surcher from Pretty Maids All in a Row, Pancho Villa, and El Sleezo Tough from The Muppet Movie.
Nominated for: Savalas was nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1962 for Birdman of Alcatraz.
Most Crushing Loss: Not receiving an honorary Oscar for his career because he didn’t live long enough.
Reasons: Well, when it comes to the 1962 Oscars, Savalas was just burned by the competition. Not to mention, he spent a lot of his career being typecast as villains and that he spent a lot of his later years playing Kojak.
Trivia: Was Jenifer Aniston’s godfather. Played Kojak. Had some chart success as a singer. Brother recorded a series of Greek folk songs and appeared as a detective on Kojak.

165. Katy Jurado

Mexican Katy Jurado was the first Latin American actress nominated for an Oscar which was for Best Supporting Actress in 1953 for Broken Lace as well as the first to win a Golden Globe. Yet, unfortunately, she couldn't break Hollywood typecasting.

Mexican Katy Jurado was the first Latin American actress nominated for an Oscar which was for Best Supporting Actress in 1953 for Broken Lace as well as the first to win a Golden Globe. Yet, unfortunately, she couldn’t break Hollywood typecasting.

Personal Life: (1924-2002) Born María Cristina Estela Marcela Jurado García in Guadalajara, Mexico. Parents and relatives were impoverished aristocrats who lost their wealth during the Mexican Revolution. Father was cattle baron and orange farmer while mother was an opera singer. Was discovered by director Emilio Fernández at 16 and pursued an acting career in spite of family wishes and married her first husband Víctor Velázquez to slip from her family’s control (she’d have 2 children with him. Made her first film in 1943. Worked as a movie columnist, radio reporter and bullfight critic to support her family and was spotted at a bullfight by John Wayne and came to Hollywood in 1951. Second husband was Ernest Borgnine. Moved back to Mexico permanently in 1968. Was plunged in a deep depression she could never overcome after her son died tragically in a highway accident at Monterrey. Suffered from heart and lung ailments toward the end of her life. Died at Cuernavaca, Mexico from kidney failure and pulmonary disease at 78.
Famous for: Mexican actress who established herself in Mexico and was a regular in Westerns during the 1950s and 1960s. Notable roles are Chelo Estrada from Bullfighter and the Lady, Helen Ramirez from High Noon, Paloma from El Bruto, Nita from Arrowhead, Señora Deverreaux from Broken Lance, Rosa from Trapeze, María Longworth from One-Eyed Jacks, Anita from The Badlanders, Sara from Barabbas, Eulalia from A Covenant with Death, Angela, the Witch from The Bridge in the Jungle, Eulogia from Fé, Esperanza y Caridad, Senora Baker from Pat Garrett & Billy The Kid, Señora Gregoria from Under the Volcano, and Meesa from The Hi-Lo Country.
Nominated for: Jurado was nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1954 for Broken Lance.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1951 for High Noon. Her performance makes you wish that Gary Cooper never married Grace Kelly in that movie.
Reasons: Jurado was a Latina who was typecast to play ethnic roles in American films, sometimes stereotypically. She had a more diverse career in Mexico but Americans don’t watch Mexican movies (at least in the Northeast).
Trivia: First Latin American actress nominated for an Oscar and win a Golden Globe. Family once owned much of the land that would become the state of Texas. Cousin of Mexican President Emilio Portes Gil. Romantically linked to John Wayne, Tyrone Power, Louis L’Amour, and Marlon Brando. Was friends with Anthony Quinn, Burt Lancaster, Sam Peckinpah, Frank Sinatra, Alan Ladd, Sammy Davis Jr., Dolores del Río, John Wayne and others.

166. Vincent Gardenia

From 1945 to his death in 1991, Italian-American actor Vincent Gardenia had a successful career in stage, film, and television. Though best known as Archie Bunker's neighbor Frank Lorenzo, he was also nominated twice for Best Supporting Actor.

From 1945 to his death in 1991, Italian-American actor Vincent Gardenia had a successful career in stage, film, and television. Though best known as Archie Bunker’s neighbor Frank Lorenzo, he was also nominated twice for Best Supporting Actor.

Personal Life: (1920-1992) Born Vincenzo Scognamiglio in Naples, Italy. Family immigrated to the US when he was 2 years old. Father established an acting troupe that performed Italian language melodramas which he’d perform while growing up in New York City. Made his stage debut at 5 and left when he made his English debut on Broadway in 1960. Died of a heart attack in Philadelphia at 72.
Famous for: Italian American actor whose career spanned for over 40 years. Notable roles are Lawyer Laslo from Murder, Inc., Bartender from The Hustler, Dutch Schnell from Bang the Drum Slowly, Det. Frank Ochoa from Death Wish, Sheriff Pete Hartmann from The Front Page, Det. Lt. Krim from Heaven Can Wait, Mr. Mushnik from Little Shop of Horrors, and Cosmo Castorini from Moonstruck.
Nominated for: Gardenia was nominated twice for Best Supporting Actor in 1973 for Bang the Drum Slowly and 1987 for Moonstruck.
Most Crushing Loss: Losing to Sean Connery for Best Supporting Actor in 1987. I mean Connery is a decent actor but his performance as Jim Malone from The Untouchables was far from his best (since he didn’t play a convincing Irishman). Gardenia should’ve at least lost to Albert Brooks or Denzel Washington.
Reasons: Probably due to that he was better known for his theatrical and TV career than his films.
Trivia: Played Frank Lorenzo in All in the Family. Life member of The Actors Studio. Won a Tony in 1972.

167. Pier Angeli

Though she won a Golden Globe for starring in Teresa, Italian actress Pier Angeli is better known for her relationships with James Dean and Vic Damone as well as being the demure ordinary girl with a delicate face.

Though she won a Golden Globe for starring in Teresa, Italian actress Pier Angeli is better known for her relationships with James Dean and Vic Damone as well as being the demure ordinary girl with a delicate face.

Personal Life: (1932-1971) Born Anna Maria Pierangeli in Cagliari, Sardinia in Italy. Made her first film in 1950 and moved to Hollywood a year later under MGM. Married twice with her first husband being Vic Damone and had a son to each husband. Found dead from a barbiturate overdose at 39.
Famous for: Italian actress known for her film appearances in the 1950s and 1960s, often starring as love interest. Notable roles are Teresa Russo from Teresa, Anna Vasarri from The Light Touch, Nina Burkhardt from The Story of Three Loves, Eufemia Calderon from Sombrero, Lisa from Flame and the Flesh, Deborra from The Silver Chalice, Norma from Somebody Up There Likes Me, Ildith from The Last Days of Sodom and Gomorrah, Louise from Battle of the Bulge, and Alexandra from Addio, Alexandra.
Nominated for: Angeli was never nominated for an Oscar. Her sister was though but she’s not as famous.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actress in 1951 for Teresa. Granted, she was young at the time but still. I mean she won a Golden Globe for it.
Reasons: Angeli was usually cast as a love interest to many of America’s emerging leading men of the time in the 1950s. Also she had a highly publicized custody battle over her son with Vic Damone during their divorce. Not to mention, she’s best known for dating James Dean and being Vic Damone’s wife. Then there’s the fact she died young.
Trivia: Twin sister of Marisa Pavan. Romantically linked to Kirk Douglas and James Dean. Was chosen to play in The Godfather but died before filming began.

168. Irene Papas

Greek actress Irene Papas starred in 70 films during her 50 year career and received international acclaim. Her dark, intense features also made her well suited for tragic roles.

Greek actress Irene Papas starred in 70 films during her over 50 year career and received international acclaim. Her dark, intense features also made her well suited for tragic roles.

Personal Life: (1926-present) Born Irini Lelekou in Chiliomodi, Corinth in Greece. Discovered by Elia Kazan and started her early career in Greece before Hollywood. Married and divorced Alkis Papas but kept his name. Retired in 2003.
Famous for: Greek actress and occasional singer who starred in over 70 films in a career spanning more than 50 years. Appeared with Anthony Quinn in 7 films. Notable roles are Luisa Azzali from The Unfaithfuls, Faidia from Theodora, Slave Empress, Grune from Attila, Jocasta Constantine from Tribute to a Bad Man, Maria from The Guns of Navarone, Elektra from Electra, Antigone, Laskarina Bouboulina from Bouboulina, Ida Ginetta from The Brotherhood, Widow from Zorba the Greek, Helene from Z, Queen Katherine of Aragon from Anne of the Thousand Days, Helen from The Trojan Women, Hind from The Message, Klytaimnistra from Iphigenia, Simonetta Palazzi from Bloodline, Mabrouka from Lion of the Desert, Shaheen Parvici from Into the Night, and Mother Giuseppina from The Assisi Underground.
Nominated for: Papas was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1964 for Zorba the Greek. There’s still time to award her an honorary Oscar for her career so get to it, Academy.
Reasons: Despite her accolades, but as Roger Ebert said, “Her height rules out many leading men, her accent rules out many roles, and her unusual beauty is not the sort that superstar actresses like to compete with.” Perhaps this is why she’s not as familiar to us as she should be. That, or it’s just that the Academy just didn’t seem to recognize her talents or she tended to get overshadowed by leading men.
Trivia: Serves on the board of directors of the Anna-Marie Foundation. Released 3 albums. Romantically linked to Marlon Brando.

169. Sir Alan Bates

Sir Alan Bates achieved fame in British cinema during the 1960s which was an era of high creativity with the New Wave films. Yet, he was also known for some of his sexual proclivities with both sexes as well, which was widely known for some years.

Sir Alan Bates achieved fame in British cinema during the 1960s which was an era of high creativity with the New Wave films. Yet, he was also known for some of his sexual proclivities with both sexes as well, which was widely known for some years.

Personal Life: (1934-2003) Born in Derby, England. Mother was a pianist while father was a cellist and insurance broker. Wanted to be an actor since he was 11. Studied acting at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art before leaving to join the Royal Air Force. Made his stage debut in 1955 and his first film in 1960. Married to Victoria Ward for 22 years yet they separated many years before her death and had 2 sons. Was also known for his proclivities with men and women. Had a hip replacement before being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Died from a stroke at 69 after going through a coma.
Famous for: British actor who rose to prominence in the 1960s when he appeared in films. Notable roles are Frank Rice from The Entertainer, Stephen Maddux from The Running Man, Basil from Zorba the Greek, Jos Jones from Georgy Girl, Gabriel Oak from Far From Madding Crowd, Yakov Bok from The Fixer, Rupert Burkin from Women in Love, Col. Vershinin from Three Sisters, Ted Burgess from The Go-Between, Saul from An Unmarried Woman, Rudge Campbell from The Rose, Sergei Diaghilev from Nijinsky, Claudius from Hamlet, Gayev from The Cherry Orchard, Jennings from Gosford Park, Alexander Leek from The Mothman Prophecies, and Tom Connolly from Evelyn.
Nominated for: Bates was nominated for Best Actor in 1968 for The Fixer.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actor in 1966 for Georgy Girl.
Reasons: Bates was well known for his bisexual proclivities which he rarely mentioned in his interviews or even acknowledged to his male lovers. One of his boyfriends was Olympic skater John Curry who died in his arms from AIDS in 1994. Yet, he also had couple of girlfriends in his later years.
Trivia: Attended RADA with Albert Finney and Peter O’Toole. Set up a theater in memory of his son who died at 19. Won 2 Tony Awards.

170. Canada Lee

Canada Lee's role as Stephen Kumalo from Cry, the Beloved Country is his best known performance. Yet, instead of an Academy Award nomination, he was blacklisted in Hollywood for his civil rights activism.

Canada Lee’s role as Stephen Kumalo from Cry, the Beloved Country is his best known performance. Yet, instead of an Academy Award nomination, he was blacklisted in Hollywood for his civil rights activism.

Personal Life: (1907-1952) Born Leonard Lionel Cornelius Canegata in New York City. Father was from the Caribbean island of St. Croix. Trained as a musician by 12 as a concert violinist. Ran away in his teens to become a jockey but ended up a boxer instead where he fought under the name of Canada Lee as a result of an announcer’s mispronunciations. Yet, an eye injury would effectively end his athletic career by 1933. Began acting in 1934 after being impoverished despite earning $90,000 in his boxing career. Made his first film in 1939. Married twice and had a son to his first wife Juanita Waller. Died of a heart attack at 45.
Famous for: American actor who pioneered roles for African Americans who furthered the tradition by such actors as Paul Robeson. Made 5 films. Notable roles are George ‘Joe’ Spencer from Lifeboat, Ben Chaplin from Body and Soul, Lt. ‘Dixie’ Thompson from Lost Boundaries, and Stephen Kumalo from Cry, the Beloved Country.
Nominated for: Lee was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actor in 1952 for Cry, the Beloved Country. What even makes it more crushing is that this was the best role of his career, which should’ve generated Oscar buzz and help his career by our standards, but not so in the 1950s.
Reasons: Well, other than being black, Lee was a civil rights activist during the 1930s and 1940s as well as spoke against segregation in the armed forces during WWII. Unfortunately, this led him to being blacklisted once he was done filming Cry, the Beloved Country and he refused to testify before the House Committee on Un-American Activities. His blacklisting is believed to have led him to his early death.
Trivia: Conducted a 15 piece orchestra in Harlem during the 1930s at a night club he also managed. Neither survived the Great Depression. Was a surrogate father figure to Dr. Jack Geiger who founded Physicians for Social Responsibility. Was the first African American DJ on a major radio station.