Movie Stars Who Have Never Won an Oscar: Part 4 – Montgomery Clift to Richard Harris

Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell were among the biggest sex symbols of the 1950s. Of course, one was known for marrying Joe DiMaggio and Arthur Miller while the other was renown for her work in adoptions and being a star doing a cleavage scene.

Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell were among the biggest sex symbols of the 1950s. Of course, one was known for marrying Joe DiMaggio and Arthur Miller while the other was renown for her work in adoptions and being a star doing a cleavage scene.

Of course, I have a lot of people on their known just for their looks and being heartthrobs. Of course, while there weren’t a lot of shirtless scenes during the Golden Age of Hollywood, they still had their sex symbols such a pin-ups. And many of these appeared in movies. Nevertheless, many movie stars who became famous for their looks don’t usually win Oscars because the Hollywood establishment doesn’t exactly take them as seriously unless they’ve done serious dramatic work or have a great Shakespearean British accent (you know who you are, Alan Rickman). Yet, while some fade, there are those who seem to endure. Now this post pertains to a lot of stars known to entice sex in the pictures like Marilyn Monroe, Jane Russell, Rita Hayworth, Jean Harlow, Marlene Dietrich, and Kim Novak. Of course, there are female stars on this post who didn’t become sex symbols like the sickeningly wholesome Doris Day (Ugh!) and the Broadway darling Rosalind Russell. Finally, we have a couple male stars on here such as Montgomery Clift, a promising actor whose career and life would never be the same after crashing his car into a telephone pole and Richard Harris, drinking buddy with Richard Burton and Peter O’Toole but later sobered up enough to play Albus Dumbledore before dying of cancer. So without further adieu, here is 10 more actors and actress who never made that iconic Oscar speech for beating Meryl Streep, Katharine Hepburn, or whoever else received a lot of acting nominations at the time.

31. Montgomery Clift

Montgomery Clift was a promising young actor after WWII whose most famous role was a soldier who'd rather play his bugle than take boxing lessons. Yet, he was unpopular among the Hollywood elite because he refused to conform to Hollywood standards. Also, his career was never the same after he crashed his car in a telephone pole near Elizabeth Taylor's place.

Montgomery Clift was a promising young actor after WWII whose most famous role was a soldier who’d rather play his bugle than take boxing lessons. Yet, he was unpopular among the Hollywood elite because he refused to conform to Hollywood standards. Also, his career was never the same after he crashed his car in a telephone pole near Elizabeth Taylor’s place.

Personal Life: (1920-1966) Born in Omaha, Nebraska. Father was vice-president of the Omaha National Trust Company. Mother thought she was an adopted illegitimate child from Southern aristocracy and had her children home schooled by private tutors until they were teenagers. During WWII, he was rejected for service due to colitis and allergies. First appeared on Broadway at 15 and performed there for 10 years before Hollywood. In 1956, he crashed his car through a telephone pole after leaving a dinner and was seriously injured with a broken jaw and nose, a fractured sinus, and several facial lacerations which required plastic surgery. He would never fully recover and began to depend on alcohol and pills for relief. His health and physical condition would deteriorate from then on. He also became erratic with his performances suffering and his career declined that he was unemployable by the 1960s. Died of a heart attack at 45.
Famous for: American actor known for playing moody and sensitive outsiders and hero victims as well as helped change Hollywood masculinity. One of the original Method Actors of Hollywood. First actor to refuse to sign a Hollywood contract and choose films independently, later adopted by Robert Redford and the Independent Film movement. Notable roles are Ralph ‘Steve’ Stevenson from The Search, Matthew ‘Matt’ Garth from Red River, Morris Townsend from The Heiress, George Eastman from A Place in the Sun, Fr. Michael William Logan from I Confess, Pvt. Robert E. Lee ‘Prew’ Prewitt from From Here to Eternity, John Wickliff Shawnessy from Raintree County, Dr. Cuckrowicz from Suddenly, Last Summer, Perce Howland from The Misfits, Sigmund Freud from Freud, and Rudolph Petersen from Judgment at Nuremberg.
Nominated for: Clift was nominated for Best Actor 3 times and Best Supporting Actor once consisting of: 1948 for The Search, 1951 for A Place in the Sun, 1953 for From Here to Eternity, and 1961 for Judgment at Nuremberg.
Most Crushing Loss: He probably should’ve won the Oscar for From Here to Eternity which basically devastated him when he lost to William Holden. Yet, the movie’s producer sent him a small golden bugle which he treasured for the rest of his life.
Reasons: Clift was said to be unpopular among the Hollywood elite for refusing to conform to Hollywood standards. He refused to reveal his private life (since he was a closeted bisexual), avoided movie premieres and parties, was usually unavailable for interviews, and preferred not to live in Los Angeles. Also, despite receiving the best care available for 1956, he’d never recover from smashing his car in a telephone pole.
Trivia: Spoke French, German, and Italian. Brother was married to Eleanor Clift and had a child with Kim Stanley. Had a twin sister who survived him by 48 years. Spent a few days in a monastery and studied priests for I Confess. Made his fellow cast and crew members cry while filming his death scene in From Here to Eternity and learned to play the bugle even if he knew it would be dubbed. Burt Lancaster was nervous and afraid Clift would out act him prior to working with him. Spent a night in a state prison for A Place in the Sun. James Dean would sometimes call him just to hear his voice.

32. Marilyn Monroe

The Seven Year Itch was a famous movie for Marilyn Monroe. Mainly because it featured her skirt blowing from the air vent on the street which cause quite a stir at the time. For awhile, there was also a huge statue of this in Chicago.

The Seven Year Itch was a famous movie for Marilyn Monroe. Mainly because it featured her skirt blowing from the air vent on the street which cause quite a stir at the time. Nevertheless, Monroe would grow dissatisfied with being typecast as a dumb, sexy blonde. Yet, as a sex symbol, no woman has ever been more enduring than her. I mean “Candle in the Wind” was written for her.

Personal Life: (1926-1962) Born Norma Jeane Mortenson in Los Angeles, California, later changed to Baker. Father either divorced her mother soon after her birth or her parents were never married at all (we’re not sure who her father was). If he knew of her existence, then he was certainly a deadbeat for her mother was mentally and financially unstable as well as unable to care for her. Spent much of her childhood in foster homes as a ward of the state and possibly experienced at least attempted sexual assault. Married her first husband at 16, just to get out of the system and when he left to serve as a Merchant Marine in WWII, she worked at a munitions factory, mainly spraying airplane parts with flame retardant and inspecting parachutes. Was discovered by a cameraman from the First Motion Picture Unit and encouraged her to apply for The Blue Book Modeling Agency. She was discovered by 20th Century Fox and changed her name to Marilyn Monroe. Made her first film in 1947. Married 3 times with her second husband Joe DiMaggio and third husband Arthur Miller. Struggled with alcohol and drug addiction as well as sought psychiatric help in her later years. Found dead from a barbiturate overdose at 36.
Famous for: American actress, model, and singer who became a major sex symbol starring in a number of commercially successful motion pictures during the 1950s and early 1960s. Notable roles are Angela Phinlay from The Asphalt Jungle, Miss Claudia Caswell from All About Eve, Nell Forbes from Don’t Bother to Knock, Miss Lois Laurel from Monkey Business, Rose Loomis from Niagara, Lorelei Lee from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Pola Debevoise from How to Marry a Millionaire, Kay Weston from The River of No Return, Victoria Hoffman from There’s No Business Like Show Business, The Girl from The Seven Year Itch, Cherie from Bus Stop, Elsie Marina from The Prince and the Showgirl, Sugar Cane Kowalczyk from Some Like It Hot, Amanda Dell from Let’s Make Love, and Roslyn Taber from The Misfits.
Nominated for: Monroe was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Should’ve been nominated for Best Actress in 1961 for The Misfits, yet it received mixed reviews and flopped. But she still received a Golden Globe and it’s proof she really could act. Also should’ve received an honorary Oscar for being such a significant cultural icon but she didn’t live too long.
Reasons: Mostly her not winning the Oscar was due to the fact her talent was rarely taken seriously due to being a sex symbol and typecast as a dumb blond she was not. Not to mention, she refused to abandon Arthur Miller when he was called to the House Committee on Un-American Activities as well as had a very terrible childhood. It didn’t help that her personal life was tabloid fodder, particularly her marriages to Joe DiMaggio and Arthur Miller (who’d later become Daniel Day Lewis’ father-in-law in the 1990s). Not to mention, she was said to be difficult to work with in her later years.
Trivia: Has status as a pop and cultural icon as well as a quintessential sex symbol. Named No. #1 in TV Guide’s Film’s Sexiest Women of All Time. Converted to Judaism upon marrying Arthur Miller. Romantically linked to Marlon Brando, John F. Kennedy, and Robert F. Kennedy. Worked at the same factory where Ronald Reagan posed for morale photographs during his service. Was a natural brunette (and didn’t dye her hair blond when she started modeling, particularly after she heard that the agency was looking for girls with lighter hair). Was featured on the cover for the first issue of Playboy Magazine where she posed nude.

33. Jean Harlow

Before Marilyn Monroe, the most famous blonde bombshell was the platinum blonde Jean Harlow known for her quick sassy wit and voice. Sadly, it's said that her platinum blonde dye might've killed her at only 26, which left William Powell devastated since she was the love of his life.

Before Marilyn Monroe, the most famous blonde bombshell was the platinum blonde Jean Harlow known for her quick sassy wit and voice. Sadly, it’s said that her platinum blonde dye might’ve killed her at only 26, which left William Powell devastated since she was the love of his life.

Personal Life: (1911-1937) Born Harlean Harlow Carpenter in Kansas City, Missouri. Father was a dentist. Was very close to her mother while her parents had a very unhappy arranged marriage. Mother was extremely protective and coddling instilling a sense her daughter owed everything she had to her. In 1922, her parents divorced and she rarely saw her father again after that. Attended high school in Illinois where her mother remarried in 1927. She married her first husband the same year and would move with him to Los Angeles where she entertained as a wealthy socialite but they divorced two years later mostly due to his drinking. Stumbled into Hollywood when she drove an actress friend to the Fox Studios for an appointment and basically went to the audition on a bet by her mother’s maiden name: Jean Harlow. Made her first film in 1928. Married 3 times and dated William Powell at the time of her death from kidney failure at 26.
Famous for: American actress and sex symbol of the 1930s. One of the biggest movie stars in the world by the late 1930s, often nicknamed the “Blond Bombshell” and the “Platinum Blonde”, and popular for her “Laughing Vamp” movie persona. Made a few films with Clark Gable. Notable roles are Helen from Hell’s Angels, Anne Courtland from The Secret Six, Gwen Allen from The Public Enemy, Anne Schuyler from Platinum Blonde, Vantine from Red Dust, Kitty Packard from Dinner at Eight, Lola Burns from Bombshell, Helen “Whitey” Wilson from Wife vs. Secretary, Gladys Benton from Libeled Lady, Suzy, Lillian ‘Lil’/’Red’ Andrews Legendre from Red-Headed Woman, and Carol Clayton from Saratoga.
Nominated for: Harlow was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Should’ve been nominated for Best Actress in 1936 for Libeled Lady. Seriously, you have to feel for her in that movie.
Reasons: Well, Harlow was seen as a sex symbol and mostly made comedies. Also, she died young, yet had relationships with much older men.
Trivia: Was Marilyn Monroe’s idol. Romantically involved with William Powell (who was said to be the love of his life and was deeply devastated when she died. Yet he was the one who financed her funeral arrangements. Ironically, they once lived a few blocks away back in Kansas City, Missouri). Called, “Baby.” Wrote a novel. Was known as the “Original Blonde Bombshell.” Bombshell was basically a parody of her life. Died during the filming of Saratoga. Using actual bleach in her hair might’ve contributed to her early death.

34. Rita Hayworth

With her deep sultry voice and her flaming red hair, Rita Hayworth was one of the top stars of the 1940s as well as one of the most prominent pin-up girls. Of course, you might've heard of her from The Shawshank Redemption if you're my age. Yet, her personal life wasn't so great since it was marred by alcoholism, 5 failed marriages, and a slow death from Alzheimer's at 68.

With her deep sultry voice and her flaming red hair, Rita Hayworth was one of the top stars of the 1940s as well as one of the most prominent pin-up girls. Of course, you might’ve heard of her from The Shawshank Redemption if you’re my age. Yet, her personal life wasn’t so great since it was marred by alcoholism, 5 failed marriages, and a slow death from Alzheimer’s at 68. Yet, her iconic scene in Gilda is the only reason why anyone watches the movie.

Personal Life: (1918-1987) Born Margarita Carmen Cansino in Brooklyn, New York City. Father came from Spain. Parents were dancers and was taught to dance by relatives. First performed in public at 6 and made her first film at 8. Father moved his family to Hollywood in hopes to perform in the movies and that his family could be a part of it as well as established his own dance studio. Yet, he lost all his investments during the Great Depression. Partnered with her dad to form “The Dancing Cansinos” in Tijuana casinos and bars since she was too young under California law. Dropped out of high school. Began her acting career at 16 though Columbia required her to change her name and have plastic surgery (skin bleaching and painful hairline electrolysis) as well as dye her hair red. Married 5 times including third husband Orson Welles and fourth husband Prince Aly Khan and had a daughter to both men. Struggled with alcoholism which prematurely aged her. Retired in 1973. Was removed from a TWA flight for an angry outburst with her agent and her drinking was so bad that she wasn’t diagnosed with Alzheimer’s until 1980, which would claim her life at 68.
Famous for: American actress and dancer who achieved fame during the 1940s as one of the era’s top stars and became known for her deep sultry voice and flaming red hair. Made 61 films in 37 years. Notable roles are Virginia Brush from The Strawberry Blonde, Dona Sol from Blood and Sand, Maria Acuña from You Were Never Lovelier, Rusty Parker/Maribelle Hicks from Cover Girl, Irene Malcolm from Affectionately Yours, Gilda Mundson Farrell from Gilda, Elsa Bannister from The Lady from Shanghai, Carmen from The Loves of Carmen, Princess Salome from Salome, Chris Emery from Affair in Trinidad, Vera Prentice-Simpson from Pal Joey, Ann Shankland from Separate Tables, Rosalie Kenny from The Money Trap, and Señora De La Plata from The Wrath of God.
Nominated for: Hayworth was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actress in 1947 for The Lady from Shanghai. That or not receiving an honorary Oscar for her career.
Reasons: Well, Hayworth was basically a sex symbol and mostly typecast as either dancers or femme fatales, sometimes both. Also, she was Hispanic and drank heavily and had a torrid personal life.
Trivia: Grandfather popularized the bolero and had a world famous dancing school in Madrid. Daughter Princess Yasmin Khan took care of her in her final years in New York City. Was a top pin-up girl for military servicemen in the 1940s and a beauty icon for women.

35. Marlene Dietrich

Though Marlene Dietrich was groomed to be the next Greta Garbo, she was her own woman who managed to remain popular by continually reinventing herself and only gave up performing after rupturing a hip in the 1970s. Her public image always pertained to defying sexual norms yet retained her femininity through her hairstyle and her deep sultry German voice.

Though Marlene Dietrich was groomed to be the next Greta Garbo, she was her own woman who managed to remain popular by continually reinventing herself and only gave up performing after rupturing a hip in the 1970s. Her public image always pertained to defying sexual norms yet retained her femininity through her hairstyle and her deep sultry German voice.

Personal Life: (1901-1992) Born Marie Magdalene Dietrich in the former Brandenburg town of Schöneberg, now part of Berlin, Germany. Father was a police lieutenant who died when she was 6 and her mother married his best friend in 1916 who was a first lieutenant of the Grenadiers but he died due to WWI injuries. Studied in violin but her dreams of being a violinist were curtailed when she injured her wrist but not without playing violin for a pit orchestra to accompany silent films in 1922 at a Berlin cinema. But she was fired after 4 weeks. Debuted on the stage as a chorus girl and worked through the ranks. Made her first film in 1923. Went to Hollywood after the success of The Blue Angel. Married to Rudolf Sieber for 43 years and had a daughter (yet it was an open marriage since she had affairs as a bisexual). Became a US citizen in 1939. Survived cervical cancer in 1965. Suffered from poor circulation in her legs. Injured her left thigh in 1973 and right leg in 1974. Retired in 1975 after she fell off stage and broke her thigh. An alcoholic and dependent on painkillers, spent the last 11 years of her life as a mostly bedridden recluse in Paris. Died of renal failure at 90.
Famous for: German-American actress and singer who remained popular during her long career by continually reinventing herself. Capitalized on her glamor and exotic looks cementing her stardom as one of the highest paid actresses of the era. Notable roles are Lola-Lola from The Blue Angel, Mademoiselle Amy Jolly from Morocco, Shanghai Lily from Shanghai Express, Helen Faraday from Blonde Venus, Princess Sophia Frederica / Catherine II from The Scarlet Empress, Madeleine de Aupre from Desire, Domini Enfilden from The Garden of Allah, Frenchy from Destry Rides Again, Jamilla from Kismet, Erika Von Schlutow from A Foreign Affair, Charlotte Inwood from Stage Fright, Altar Keane from Rancho Notorious, Maria de Creveçoeur from The Monte Carlo Story, Christine Vole (Helm) / cockney woman from Witness for the Prosecution, and Mrs. Bertholt from Judgment at Nuremberg.
Nominated for: Dietrich was nominated for Best Actress in 1931 for Morocco.
Most Crushing Loss: Should’ve been nominated for Best Actress in 1957 for Witness for the Prosecution. Seriously, who knew she could master a Cockney accent.
Reasons: Well, her strong anti-Nazi made her a rather controversial figure in Germany for years after WWII. Was also bisexual as well as reputed to have many affairs. Not to mention, she was often seen as a sex symbol and starred in a lot of risqué stuff in her early career.
Trivia: Mother’s family owned a clock making firm. Was a staunch anti-Nazi and was one of the first celebrities to raise war bonds during WWII and performed for Allied Troops in Algeria, Italy, Britain, and France. Recordings were used for the OSS such as “Lili Marleen.” Sister and brother-in-law ran a movie theater for the Nazi officials from the Bergen Belsen concentration camp whom she interceded with Allied officials on behalf of her relatives, sheltering them from possible prosecution as Nazi collaborators. Said to travel with a medal of St. Christopher in her satchel. Was awarded the Medal of Freedom and the Légion d’honneur. Known for wearing men’s suits off-screen. Funeral at Le Madeleine Roman Catholic Church had 1,500 mourners. Boxed at Sabri Mahir’s boxing studio in Berlin during the 1920s. Dubbed “the world’s most glamorous grandmother” upon the birth of her grandson in 1948. Romantically linked to Gary Cooper, Mercedes de Acosta, Erich Maria Remarque, Yul Brynner, George Bernard Shaw, John F. Kennedy, John Wayne, and Jimmy Stewart.

36. Rosalind Russell

While Rosalind Russell played classy and glamorous roles, she never became a sex symbol in her long career playing professional women. In fact, some of her later roles like Mama Rose and Auntie Mame are especially iconic which earned her acclaim on Broadway and on the screen.

While Rosalind Russell played classy and glamorous roles, she never became a sex symbol in her long career playing professional women. In fact, some of her later roles like Mama Rose and Auntie Mame are especially iconic which earned her acclaim on Broadway and on the screen.

Personal Life: (1907-1976) Born Catherine Rosalind Russell in Waterbury, Connecticut. Attended Marymount College and the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. Her parents thought she was studying to be a teacher instead of a stage comedienne she was planning to be. Started out as a model and took a job for a stock company against her parents’ wishes as well as had a brief career in opera. Moved to Los Angeles in the early 1930s as a contract player for Universal Pictures and felt humiliated and moved to MGM. Made her first film in 1934. Married to Frederick Brisson for 35 years and had a son. Had a mental breakdown in 1943 and struggled with severe rheumatoid arthritis. Died after a long battle with breast cancer at 65.
Famous for: American actress known for playing character roles, exceptionally wealthy, dignified, ladylike women, as well as for being one of the few actresses of her time who regularly played professional women, such as judges, reporters, and psychiatrists. Had a wide career span from the 1930s to 1970s and attributed her long career to the fact, although usually playing classy and glamorous roles, she never became a sex symbol. Notable roles are Olivia from Night Must Fall, Christine from The Citadel, Sylvia Howard Fowler from The Women, Hildy Johnson from His Girl Friday, Ann Winters from This Thing Called Love, Ruth Sherwood from My Sister Eileen, Elizabeth Kenny from Sister Kenny, Lavinia Mannon from Mourning Becomes Electra, Miss Rosemary Sydney from Picnic, Mame Dennis from Auntie Mame, Mrs. Bertha Jacoby from A Majority of One, Susan Manning Middlecott from A Woman of Distinction, Mama Rose Hovick from Gypsy, and Mother Superior from The Trouble With Angels.
Nominated for: Russell was nominated 4 times for Best Actress consisting of 1942 for My Sister Eileen, 1946 for Sister Kenny, 1947 for Mourning Becomes Electra, and 1958 for Auntie Mame.
Most Crushing Loss: Losing to Loretta Young for the 1947 Best Actress race, which she was expected to win. Seriously, nobody remembers The Farmer’s Daughter. Not to mention, what’s more crushing is that Russell might not have lost fair and square to Clark Gable’s baby mama.
Reasons: Was typecast as a sophisticated lady in melodramas during her early years and mostly acted in comedies. Had a reputation as a stage diva, which is fine on Broadway but not in the movies. Also wasn’t willing to settle for a Best Supporting Actress nomination, which might’ve gotten her off the list.
Trivia: Took many roles originally offered to Myrna Loy. Won 5 Golden Globes and a Tony. Cary Grant introduced her to her husband and was best man at her wedding. Wrote the story to The Unguarded Moment. Was an advocate for the disabled. Received a Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award in 1973 for her charity work.

37. Doris Day

Doris Day was one of the top box office draws in her day as well as one of the most popular stars of the 1950s. Unfortunately, good girl image in movies just makes me puke whenever I see her on screen. Seriously, I was relieved to see her chatting about porn with Johnny Carson on TCM.

Doris Day was one of the top box office draws in her day as well as one of the most popular stars of the 1950s. Unfortunately, good girl image in movies just makes me puke whenever I see her on screen. Seriously, I was relieved to see her chatting about porn with Johnny Carson on TCM.

Personal Life: (1924-present) Born Doris Mary Ann Kappelhoff in Cincinnati, Ohio. Father was a music teacher and choir master. Parents separated during her childhood. Trained and aspired to be a dancer but a 1937 accident injured her legs so trained to become a singer instead. Made her recording debut in 1939 and her first film in 1948 after auditioning for Michael Curtiz. Married 4 times and had a son with first husband Al Jorden and adopted by third husband Martin Melcher. In 1968, she found her late husband’s business partner (and their lawyer) squandered her earnings which left her deeply in debt that led to lawsuits and eventual bankruptcy. Retired in 1973.
Famous for: American actress and singer who began her career as a big band singer in 1939 and had a long contract with Columbia Records and was one of the most acclaimed singers of the 20th century and one of the most successful singer-actors to date. Made 39 films. Notable roles are Georgia Garrett from Romance on the High Seas, Judy Adams from It’s a Great Feeling, Jo Jordan from Young Man with a Horn, Nanette Carter from Tea for Two, Jan Wilson from West Point Story, Melinda Howard from Lullaby on Broadway, Marjorie “Marjie” Winfield from On Moonlight Bay, Grace LeBoy Kahn from I’ll See You in My Dreams, Calamity Jane, Laurie Tuttle from Young at Heart, Ruth Etting from Love Me or Leave Me, Josephine “Jo” McKenna from The Man Who Knew Too Much, Katherine “Babe” Williams from The Pajama Game, Jan Morrow from Pillow Talk, Kate Robinson Mackay from Please Don’t Eat the Daisies, Kit Preston from Midnight Lace, Carol Templeton from Lover Come Back, Cathy Timberlake from That Touch of Mink, Beverly Boyer from The Thrill of It All, Ellen Wagstaff Arden from Move Over, Darling, Judy Kimball form Send Me No Flowers, Janet Harper from Do Not Disturb, and Abby McClure from With Six You Get Eggroll.
Nominated for: Day was nominated for Best Actress in 1959 for Pillow Talk.
Most Crushing Loss: I don’t like this actress and think she sucks. Yet, I’d probably say not being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1950 for Young Man with a Horn because she’s not around as much to ruin the movie. Of course, she earned an honorary Oscar for Lifetime Achievement.
Reasons: Well, Day is mainly noted for playing virginal wholesome characters and/or wives and moms with the kind of sugary coated sweetness that makes certain film aficionados vomit (in real life she was anything but since she openly discussed porn with Johnny Carson during the 1970s, I kid you not). Yeah, her movies basically appeal to a certain demographic which consists of white, socially conservative, and over 65. And even among them there are haters (like my grandparents as an actress at least). But I wouldn’t say she was a bad actress since she had a better emotional range than Kristen Stewart.
Trivia: Is an animal rights activist and founded the Doris Day Animal League which is a partner to the Humane Society of the United States. Co-owned a hotel with her son as well as has many pets and adopts stray animals. Released 31 albums and her songs spent 460 weeks in the Top 40. Oldest living artist to score a UK Top 10 with an album featuring new material. Established the annual observance of Spay Day. Is 6th among the Top 10 box office performers of all time. Voted favorite star by US servicemen serving in Korea.

38. Kim Novak

Kim Novak was a leading sex symbol of the 1950s with her deep voice, blond hair, and good looks. Unfortunately, when viewing her movies, it's very clear that studios and critics loved her just for her looks because she has a similar range in her movies as Kristen Stewart.

Kim Novak was a leading sex symbol of the 1950s with her deep voice, blond hair, and good looks. Unfortunately, when viewing her movies, it’s very clear that studios and critics loved her just for her looks because she has a similar range in her movies as Kristen Stewart.

Personal Life: (1933-present) Born Marilyn Pauline Novak in Chicago, Illinois. Father was a history teacher who worked as a dispatcher on the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad while mother was a factory worker. Attended Wright Junior College and won scholarships for the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Was a model for a refrigerator company trade show and was standing in line to be extras in a Jane Russell film when she was discovered by an agent who signed her for Columbia Pictures. Used “Kim” as a stage name not to get confused with Marilyn Monroe. Made her first film in 1954. Married twice. Married to veterinarian Dr. Robert Malloy for 39 years as of 2015. Retired in 1991. Bought a 43 acre ranch in Sams Valley, Oregon in which the house burned to the ground in 2000 that consumed all her art and the first draft of her biography she worked on for 10 years. Was injured in a horse riding accident in 2006 suffering a punctured lung, broken ribs, and nerve damage but made a full recovery within a year. Was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2006. Struggles with bipolar.
Famous for: American actress whose career began at 21 and came to prominence almost immediately in the 1950s. In the 1960s, she withdrew from the public eye and only acted sporadically until her retirement in 1991. Notable roles are Marjorie “Madge” Owens from Picnic, Molly from The Man with the Golden Arm, Jeanne Eagels, Linda English from Pal Joey, Judy Barton from Vertigo, Gillian “Gil” Holroyd from Bell, Book, and Candle, Betty Preisser from Middle of the Night, Mildred Rogers from Of Human Bondage, Polly the Pistol from Kiss Me, Stupid, Moll Flanders from The Amorous Adventures of Moll Flanders, Lola Brewster from The Mirror Crack’d, and Lillian Anderson Munnsen from Liebestraum.
Nominated for: Novak was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: I don’t like this actress either. Yet, if I have to say she was robbed for not getting the Best Supporting Actress nomination in 1958 for Vertigo. I mean she had the role she was born to play such as basically looking pretty for Jimmy Stewart and not saying much.
Reasons: Basically was mostly an actress for her looks as a blonde bombshell sex symbol and her acting style had the same emotional range as Kristen Stewart. Yet, she was taken more seriously as an actress than Marilyn Monroe for some reason since she got more dramatic parts. Yet, Monroe was the much better actress, while Novak doesn’t come off as believable.
Trivia: Romantically linked to Sammy Davis Jr., Prince Aly Kahn, and Frank Sinatra. Hobbies included raising horses, photography, poetry, and painting in oil and water color. Paintings are impressionistic and surrealist. Has exhibited her work at least once.

39. Jane Russell

Contrary to legend, Jane Russell didn't wear the bra Howard Hughes designed for her while filming The Outlaw because she thought it was too uncomfortable. So she wore her own with a few minor adjustments such as tissue padding and straps pulled. Guess Hughes was very bad at designing women's lingerie.

Contrary to legend, Jane Russell didn’t wear the bra Howard Hughes designed for her while filming The Outlaw because she thought it was too uncomfortable. So she wore her own with a few minor adjustments such as tissue padding and straps pulled. Guess Hughes was very bad at designing women’s lingerie.

Personal Life: (1921-2011) Born Ernestine Jane Geraldine Russell in Bemidji, Minnesota. Father was a First Lieutenant in the US Army who later became an office manager and mother was an actress for a road troupe. Grew up in Southern California. Worked as a receptionist and model while studying acting with Max Reinhardt’s Theatrical Workshop and acting coach Maria Ouspenskaya. Made her first film in 1943. Married 3 times with first husband being NFL hall of famer Bob Waterfield and adopted 3 children with him due to be rendered infertile after a botched back alley abortion. Married to John Calvin Peoples for 25 years. Retired in 1986. Died of respiratory failure at 92.
Famous for: American actress and one of the leading sex symbols of the 1940s and 1950s. Notable roles are Rio McDonald from The Outlaw, Calamity Jane from The Paleface, Lenore Brent from His Kind of Woman, Julie Benson from Macao, Mike ‘The Torch’ Delroy from Son of Paleface, Belle Starr from Montana Belle, Dorothy Shaw from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Amanda Lawrence from Foxfire, Bonnie Jones / Mimi Jones from Gentlemen Marry Brunettes, and Jill Stone from Waco.
Nominated for: Russell was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actress in either of The Paleface movies. It’s amazing she could keep a straight face through either of them since Bob Hope was her favorite co-star. Either that or the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award for her work on adoptions.
Reasons: Her iconic still from The Outlaw might’ve ruined her chances since it made her a sex symbol and that the filmed earned a lot of notoriety for it. Also acted mostly in comedies, musicals, and westerns.
Trivia: Founded the World Adoption International Fund (WAIF). First husband was an UCLA All American, played for the Los Angeles Rams, and was the team’s head coach as well as member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Started the “Hollywood Christian Group” which was a weekly Bible study at her home which was attended by many of the leading names in the film industry. Delved briefly into music and played piano. Actually said she didn’t wear the famed so-called Howard Hughes designed underwire bra for The Outlaw filming since she found it so uncomfortable that she discarded it and wore her own with the cups padded with tissue and the straps pulled up to elevate her breasts (making Hughes’ investment a huge waste of money. Clearly he didn’t know how to design bras).

40. Richard Harris

Yes, I know it sounds a bit bizarre but before he played Dumbledore in the first 2 Harry Potter movies, he played King Arthur in Camelot, which my mom listened to a lot when she was young. Also known for recording, "McArthur Park," which has the lines, "Someone left the cake out in the rain...And I don't know how to take it/Because it took so long to bake it/And I'll never see that recipe again....Oh, No!"

Yes, I know it sounds a bit bizarre but before he played Dumbledore in the first 2 Harry Potter movies, he played King Arthur in Camelot, which my mom listened to a lot when she was young. Also known for recording, “McArthur Park,” which has the lines, “Someone left the cake out in the rain…And I don’t know how to take it/Because it took so long to bake it/And I’ll never see that recipe again….Oh, No!”

Personal Life: (1930-2002) Born in Limerick to a staunchly Roman Catholic middle class family. Played rugby in high school but his athletic career was cut short due to contracting tuberculosis. Failed to gain entrance to acting schools mostly for being too old (like 24) but enrolled in the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art. While still a student he directed his own production of a Clifford Odets play which was a critical success but a financial failure that caused him to lose all his savings and become temporarily homeless. After completing his studies, he joined Joan Littlewood’s Theatre Workshop and spent nearly a decade learning his craft on the British stage. Made his film debut in 1958. Married twice and had 3 sons to first wife Elizabeth Rees-Williams. Was known for his heavy drinking and drug use. Gave up drinking in 1981 but had a Guinness a decade later. Gave up drugs in 1978 after nearly dying from a cocaine overdose. Died of Hodgkin’s disease at 72, 2 1/2 weeks before the American premiere of Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets.
Famous for: Irish actor, singer, director, writer, and producer who appeared on stage and in many films. Career spanned nearly 45 years. Notable roles are Frank Manchin from This Sporting Life, King Arthur from Camelot, Capt. Benjamin Tyreen from Major Dundee, Oliver Cromwell from Cromwell, John Morgan from A Man Called Horse, King Richard the Lionheart from Robin and Marian, Bull McCabe from The Field, Paddy O’Neil from Patriot Games, Marcus Aurelius from Gladiator, English Bob from Unforgiven, and Albus Dumbledore from the first 2 Harry Potter movies.
Nominated for: Harris was nominated twice for Best Actor in 1963 for This Sporting Life and in 1990 for The Field.
Most Crushing Loss: I wouldn’t say losing to Sidney Poitier and Jeremy Irons was a big loss for him but he probably should’ve been nominated for Camelot.
Reasons: Harris had a reputation as a hellraiser as well as hard drinker with substance abuse problems. Also was a vocal supporter for the PIRA during Ireland’s Troubles, which was a known terrorist organization. Makes being cast as Dumbledore all the more ironic. Also was burned out by the competition.
Trivia: Recorded several music albums and the song “McArthur Park.” Member of the Knights of Malta and dubbed a knight by the Queen of Denmark. Supported the IRA for 11 years. Granddaughter threatened never to speak to him again if he turned down the role of Dumbledore for Harry Potter. Wrote a book of poetry. Paid 75,000 pounds for William Burges’ Tower House when he heard Liberace intended to buy it but hadn’t yet made a deposit and employed the original decorators for interior restoration work. Said of the Harry Potter films, “Because, you see, I don’t just want to be remembered for being in those bloody films, and I’m afraid that’s what’s going to happen to me.”

Advertisements

Movie Stars Who Have Never Won an Oscar: Part 3 – John Barrymore to Rock Hudson

Tony Curtis: "Can't believe your son won an Emmy for playing Liberace. Kirk Douglas: "Can't believe your daughter married the six finger man who killed Inigo Montoya's father and talks about how yogurt helps her bowel movements on television."

Tony Curtis: “Can’t believe your son won an Emmy for playing Liberace and is married to Catherine Zeta-Jones.”
Kirk Douglas: “Can’t believe your daughter married the six finger man who killed Inigo Montoya’s father and talks about how yogurt helps her bowel movements on television.”

Of course, I can’t just stop at 20 since the Golden Age of Hollywood has produced its share of screen legends that it’s shocking to see which ones have never received a competitive Oscar win or lost to people who weren’t nearly as good. Sometimes it’s understandable and there are other times when it had nothing to do with their talents (like race, Red Scare, and just being very bad to work with). Now this selection pertains to even more legends I haven’t covered yet in my first two posts. First we have John Barrymore who was well known for his theatrical and film career but is better known nowadays for being Drew Barrymore’s alcoholic grandfather. Second, there’s Tony Curtis and Kirk Douglas who both starred together in movies like The Vikings and Spartacus. Also known for fathering children who also went into show business like Jamie Lee Curtis and Michael Douglas. Third, you have Natalie Wood and James Dean, famous for not only starring in Rebel Without a Cause together but also falling to untimely deaths whether it be through drowning or reckless driving. Then there’s Fred Astaire best known for singing and dancing with Ginger Rogers as well as became a fashion icon for decades. Next we have Lew Ayres who was married to Ginger Rogers and causing a public outcry when he tried to get out of WWII as a conscientious objector. After that is Gene Tierney known for playing femme fatales and leading ladies as well as suffering a terrible tragedy in her life because she didn’t get vaccinated (since an MMR and rubella vaccine wasn’t available yet). Next, we have Vincent Price who is well known for his horror movies with his signature voice and is Tim Burton’s hero. Finally, we have Rock Hudson best known for playing alongside Doris Day, being trapped in the celluloid closet, and dying of AIDS. So for your pleasure, here are 10 more actors and actresses who’ve never won a competitive Oscar.

21. John Barrymore

John Barrymore was hailed as the greatest Shakespearean actor of his generation inspiring actors like Alec Guinness, John Gielgud, and Laurence Olivier. Yet, by the late 1930s, his career and personal life was a total wreck due to his chronic alcoholism, which would later kill him.

John Barrymore was hailed as the greatest Shakespearean actor of his generation inspiring actors like Alec Guinness, John Gielgud, and Laurence Olivier. Yet, by the late 1930s, his career and personal life was a total wreck due to his chronic alcoholism, which would later kill him. He’s also Drew Barrymore’s grandfather by the way.

Personal Life: (1882-1942) Born John Sidney Blyth in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Younger brother of Lionel and Ethel. Father was an Indian born British actor who adopted “Barrymore” as a stage name after seeing it on poster for the Haymarket Theater in London but he was a mostly absentee womanizing drunk. Mother was from a theatrical family. He was a badly behaved child that he was sent away to schools in attempts to instill discipline but kept getting thrown out. At 10, his maternal grandmother who raised him lost control of the theater she owned causing disruption among the family. At 11, mother died from tuberculosis which compelled Lionel and Ethel to seek work as professional actors. At 15, he lost his virginity to his stepmother and his grandmother died. Was basically forced into acting by his father. At 19, his father had a mental breakdown as a result from 3rd stage syphilis in which he was institutionalized. Worked as an illustrator for The New York Journal and as a poster designer. Decided to go into acting full time only for the money. Stage career began in 1903 and made his first movie in 1913. Married 4 times and had 3 children including a daughter Diana (who died at 38 due to drugs and alcohol) to second wife Blanche Oelrichs (a.ka. Michael Strange), as well as a daughter and son to third wife Dolores Costello. Grandfather of Drew Barrymore through son John Drew. Was notoriously known for his alcoholism which he struggled with since 14, which wrecked his marriages and contributed to his decline and death. He also ran enormous debts with his lavish lifestyle which drove him into bankruptcy. Died of pneumonia, kidney failure, and liver cirrhosis at 60.
Famous for: American actor who tried to avoid the stage but appeared with his father and sister. First gained attention as a stage actor then high drama with his portrayal of Hamlet led him being called, “the greatest living American tragedarian.” During the 1920s, he was the most celebrated Shakespearean actor in the world as well as influenced a generation of actors such as Sirs Alec Guinness, John Gielgud, and Laurence Olivier. In 1925, he left his 14 year stage career to devote himself to films and made an easy transition to sound. Notable film roles are Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde from the 1920 version, Sherlock Holmes from the 1922 version, Beau Brummel, Captain Ahab Ceely from The Sea Beast, Don Juan, Svengali, Arsene Lupin, Hilary Fairfield from A Bill of Divorcement, Oscar Jaffe from Twentieth Century, the Baron from Grand Hotel, Larry Renault from Dinner at Eight, and Mercutio from Romeo and Juliet.
Nominated for: He is the only Barrymore sibling not to win or even be nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: He should’ve at least received an Oscar nomination for Best Actor in 1934 for Twentieth Century.
Reasons: If there was anything keeping him from getting that gold statuette it was probably his lifelong struggle with alcoholism. From 1936 on his heavy drinking would greatly affect his performances in which he start forgetting his lines that he had to read them on black boards behind the camera. This made it difficult for him to get work and would later be reduced to lampooning himself for money as a washed up has been. Of course, out of the Barrymore siblings, he was the dysfunctional one.
Trivia: During his days as a struggling actor, he had a fling with and proposed to Evelyn Nesbit but her mom sent her to New Jersey to break of the relationship. Yet, he was expected to testify at her then husband’s murder trial after his public murder of her ex-boyfriend architect Stanford White. Witnessed the 1906 San Francisco earthquake.

22. James Dean

Though James Dean only starred in 3 movies, before wrecking his Porsche at 24, he forever remains an icon of 1950s adolescent angst and screen legend. Of course, it's no surprise that he didn't win an Oscar since Best Actor Academy Awards don't go to guys under 30 unless he's Adrien Brody.

Though James Dean only starred in 3 movies, before wrecking his Porsche at 24, he forever remains an icon of 1950s adolescent angst and screen legend. Of course, it’s no surprise that he didn’t win an Oscar since Best Actor Academy Awards don’t go to guys under 30 unless he’s Adrien Brody.

Personal Life: (1931-1955) Born in Marion, Indiana. Father was a farmer and dental technician. Moved to Santa Monica, California at 6. Mother died of uterine cancer when he was 9 years old and was sent back to Fairmount, Indiana to live with his sister. Moved back to California after graduating high school. Attended Santa Monica College for pre-law but transferred to UCLA for drama leading to estrangement from his father. Yet, he dropped out to pursue acting full time. Got his start through acting on television and bit parts. Studied method acting under James Whitmore and Lee Strasberg. Starred in only 3 films. Sexual orientation was a contested subject among his contemporaries and is still debated to this day though his best remembered relationship was with Pier Angeli. Known for his extreme mood swings and might’ve been bipolar. Died when he wrecked his Porsche 550 Spyder called, “Lil’ Bastard” at the junction of California State Routes 46 and 41 at 24.
Famous for: American actor and culture icon of teenage disillusionment. His performances in his 3 films and fatal car crash at 24 cemented his enduring popularity and legendary status to this day. Notable roles are Cal Trask from East of Eden, Jim Stark from Rebel Without a Cause, and Jett Rink from Giant.
Nominated for: Had 2 nominations for Best Actor both posthumously: 1955 for East of Eden and 1956 for Giant.
Most Crushing Loss: While it’s crushing enough that Dean lost to Ernest Borgnine and Yul Brynner after his death, it’s not at all surprising since his age would’ve made him a long shot anyway. Yet, I think the biggest loss for him would be dying before he could make more movies.
Reasons: Posthumously or not, Best Actor Oscars never go to guys under 30. Adrien Brody for his performance as Wladyslaw Szpilpman in The Pianist in 2003 is the notable exception and as a nominee, he was considered a long shot against Michael Caine, Nicholas Cage, Jack Nicholson, and Daniel Day Lewis. His well-deserved win was a total upset (and even he was shocked). Nevertheless, Brody is considered the youngest Best Actor winner to date at 29, 5 years older than Dean at his death. But his win in 2003 helps explain why Dean never won an Oscar. Still, I think Dean probably would’ve won an Oscar had he lived longer (or not fatally crashing his Porsche at 24).
Trivia: Was an auto racing enthusiast and would also compete in actual races that Warner Bros. had to bar him from racing activities during Giant’s production (for good reason). Still, in a twist of tragic irony, while filming Giant just 13 days before his death, Dean appeared in a TV PSA with Gig Young warning kids about driving fast on the highway. Should’ve listened to his own advice.

23. Natalie Wood

Natalie Wood began her career as a child actress and managed to receive 3 Oscar nominations before she was 25. Yet, she was also noted for her 2 marriages to Robert Wagner, a stage mother, mental illness, and a death through drowning that people just can't stop talking about.

Natalie Wood began her career as a child actress and managed to receive 3 Oscar nominations before she was 25. Yet, she was also noted for her 2 marriages to Robert Wagner, a stage mother, mental illness, and a death through drowning that people just can’t stop talking about.

Personal Life: (1938-1981) Born Natalia Nikolaevna Zacharenko in San Francisco, California to Russian immigrant parents. Father was a day laborer and carpenter while mother once dreamed of becoming an actress or ballet dancer. Family moved to Santa Rosa and changed their name to “Gurdin” shortly after her birth where she was discovered during a film shoot. Made her first film in 1943 at 4. Fell in a river and nearly drowned at 9 which left her with a permanently weakened left wrist with a slight bone intrusion that she hid with large bracelets for the rest of her life whether filming or out in public. Married 3 times, most notably twice to Robert Wagner and had 2 children. Struggled with depression and in 1966 may have tried to commit suicide through a sleeping pill overdose. Was afraid of water and never learned to swim. Drowned during a weekend boating trip at 43 under mysterious but probably accidental circumstances (like falling off the boat while drunk and on medication while or after arguing with her husband).
Famous for: American actress who became a successful adult film star after working in movies as a child as well as receiving 3 Academy Award nominations before she was 25 years old. Made 20 films by 16. Notable roles are Susan Walker from Miracle on 34th Street, Anna Muir as a child from The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, Judy from Rebel Without a Cause, Debbie Edwards from The Searchers, Marjorie Morganstern from Marjorie Morningstar, Maria from West Side Story, Wilma Dean Loomis from Splendor in the Grass, Louise Hovick aka Gypsy Rose Lee from Gypsy, Helen Gurley Brown from Sex and the Single Girl, Maggie DuBois from The Great Race, Penelope Elcott from Penelope, Alva Starr from This Property Is Condemned, Carol Sanders from Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, Daisy Clover from Inside Daisy Clover, and Karen Brace from Brainstorm.
Nominated for: Wood was nominated 3 times twice for Best Actress and once for Best Supporting Actress consisting of 1955 for Rebel Without a Cause, 1961 for Splendor in the Grass, and 1963 for Love with the Proper Stranger.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actress in 1962 for Gypsy for I think she should’ve had some recognition for a role which she actually does her own singing, instead of having her voice dubbed by Marni Nixon.
Reasons: For one, Wood wasn’t even 25 years old and had spent most of the late 1950s and early 1960s playing teenagers. While more women under 30 have won Oscars for leading roles than men (by 28 to 1 or just Adrien Brody. Luise Rainier and Jodie Foster were under 30 at both their wins so this has happened 30 times.), this isn’t always the case particularly if they’re against a much more established actress. And whenever Wood was nominated, she was usually burned by the competition. Also, she died young before she could make a decent comeback.
Trivia: Spoke English and Russian with an American accent. Sister was a Bond girl and played the same character she did in The Searchers. Called, “Natasha” by her family. Attended high school with Robert Redford. Christopher Walken was on the boating trip when she drowned. Romantically linked to Nicholas Ray and Warren Beatty. Yacht was called the Splendor. Had a grandfather who worked in a chocolate factory and died during the Russian Revolution. Was invited to appear in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade after appearing in Miracle on 34th Street.

24. Fred Astaire

Dancing almost as soon as he could walk, Fred Astaire is best known for his movies with Ginger Rogers. Yet, unlike Gene Kelly, he's managed to stay relevant by reinventing himself, earning an Oscar nomination in the 1970s, and doing a TV Christmas special. I mean his career spanned 76 years. Also married a jockey.

Dancing almost as soon as he could walk, Fred Astaire is best known for his movies with Ginger Rogers. Yet, unlike Gene Kelly, he’s managed to stay relevant by reinventing himself, earning an Oscar nomination in the 1970s, and doing a TV Christmas special. I mean his career spanned 76 years. Also married a jockey.

Personal Life: (1899-1987) Born Frederich Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska. Father was an Austrian Jewish convert to Catholicism and brewer. Mother was a German Lutheran willing to use her children’s talents to escape Omaha as soon as his sister Adele showed talent as an instinctive dancer and singer. Thus, he basically started dancing and singing almost as soon as he could walk and talk appearing on vaudeville with his sister as later appeared on the Orpheum Circuit. Yet had to take 2 years off due to child labor laws. Mother used Astaire as a stage name. At 17, he met a song plugger for Jerome H. Remick’s music publishing company named George Gershwin, which affect both of their careers. Debuted on Broadway with Adele the next year and continued a stage career until she married the Duke of Devonshire in 1932. Retired for good in 1981. Married twice and had 2 children with first wife Phyllis Potter. Second wife was jockey Robyn Smith. Died of pneumonia at 88.
Famous for: American dancer, choreographer, musician, and actor with a career spanning 76 years in which he made 31 musical films and several award winning television specials and issued numerous recordings. Named 5th Greatest Male Star of All Time by the American Film Institute. Best known for his 11 movies with Ginger Rogers which transformed the genre. Gave up musicals to focus on straight acting from 1957-1981. Notable roles are Guy Holden from The Gay Divorcee, Jerry Travers from Top Hat, John “Lucky” Garnett from Swing Time, Peter P. “Petrov” Peters from Shall We Dance, Vernon Castle from The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle, Jim Hardy from Holiday Inn, Bob Davis from You Were Never Lovelier, Don Hewes from Easter Parade, Josh Barkley from The Barkleys of Broadway, Tom Bowen from Royal Wedding, Tony Hunter from The Band Wagon, Dick Avery from Funny Face, Finian McLonergan from Finian’s Rainbow, Julian Osborn from On the Beach, and Harry Claiborne from The Towering Inferno.
Nominated for: He was nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1974 for The Towering Inferno.
Most Crushing Loss: Not getting a nomination for any of his movies with Ginger Rogers. At least he got an honorary Oscar in 1950.
Reasons: The Hollywood establishment probably wasn’t too keen with awarding prestigious film prizes to song and dance guys. Hell, Ginger Rogers had to appear in a drama to receiver her Oscar for Best Actress in 1941.
Trivia: Could also play piano, clarinet, drums, and accordion. Was a lifelong golf and Thoroughbred horse racing enthusiast. His horse Triplicate won the prestigious Hollywood Gold Cup and San Juan Capistrano Handicap in 1946. Remained a male fashion icon exchanging his top hat and tails for a breezy casual style of tailored sports jackets, colored shirts, cravats, and slacks held by a tie. Was physically active well into his 80s and injured his left wrist while riding his grandson’s skateboard. Never wanted his life to be a biopic and last request was to thank his fans for their years of support. Successfully wooed a socialite away from her husband against his mother and sister’s wishes (though she was his wife for 21 years so it worked out). Starred in the Christmas special, Santa Claus Is Coming to Town. He and his sister have an award named after them sponsored by Anglo-American Contemporary Dance Foundation.

25. Tony Curtis

Though known better today as Jamie Lee Curits' father and Sir Christopher Guest's father-in-law, he's had a long career acting in romantic comedies, epics, serious drama, and playing the Boston Strangler. Of course, he spent a great time of his career trying to get Hollywood to take him seriously.

Though known better today as Jamie Lee Curits’ father and Sir Christopher Guest’s father-in-law, Tony Curtis had a long career acting in romantic comedies, epics, serious drama, and playing the Boston Strangler. Of course, he spent a great time of his career trying to get Hollywood to take him seriously.

Personal Life: (1925-2010) Born Bernard Schwartz in the Bronx of New York City to Hungarian Jewish parents. Father was a tailor and the family resided in the back of his shop. Mother was an abusive schizophrenic who was later institutionalized as well as his brother Robert. Didn’t learn English until he was 6 due to delayed schooling. At 8, he and his brother Julius were placed in an orphanage because their parents couldn’t afford to feed them. At 12, lost his brother Julius who was struck and killed by a truck. After that, he joined a local gang known for skipping school and petty thievery. But he managed to settle down after a friendly neighbor sent him to Boy Scout camp. Enlisted in the Navy after Pearl Harbor, served on a submarine, and witnessed Japan’s surrender on his ship’s bridge in Tokyo Bay. After the war, attended City College of New York and studied acting at The New School in Greenwich Village. Discovered by David O. Selznick’s niece who said he was the handsomest of the boys. Signed on to Universal Pictures and moved to Hollywood at 23. Married 6 times with Janet Leigh being his first marriage. Had 6 kids with 2 daughters to Leigh (Jamie Lee and Kelly Curtis), 2 daughters to second wife Christine Kaufman, and 2 sons to third wife Leslie Allen (including Nicholas who died of a drug overdose in 1994). Had problems with alcohol and drug abuse but managed to check in a Betty Ford Clinic in the mid-1980s and stay sober. Nevertheless, later years were plagued with various health problems including heart attacks a bout of pneumonia that nearly killed him, and COPD. Died of cardiac arrest at 85.
Famous for: American actor whose career spanned 6 decades and over 100 films covering a wide range of genres from light comedies to serious drama. Though his early roles were more or less based on his good looks, he soon became a notable and strong screen presence when given the chance. Notable roles are Sidney Falco from Sweet Smell of Success, Joe/Josephine/Shell Oil Junior from Some Like It Hot, Bob Weston from Sex and the Single Girl, Antoninus from Spartacus, Ira Hayes from The Outsider, Andrei Bulba from Taras Bulba, John “Joker” Jackson from The Defiant Ones, Rodriguez from The Last Tycoon, Erik from The Vikings, and Albert DeSalvo from The Boston Strangler.
Nominated for: Nominated for Best Actor in 1958 for The Defiant Ones.
Most Crushing Loss: Though I can’t blame him for losing to David Niven, I think it’s a shame that he wasn’t nominated for Best Actor for The Boston Strangler.
Reasons: Of course, in 1958, he was just burned by the competition. However, he probably never won an Oscar because he was originally seen as a pretty boy and it took a while for him to gain recognition as a serious actor. Not to mention, despite how funny Some Like It Hot is, Oscars just don’t go to comedies either.
Trivia: Mother appeared on You Bet Your Life with Groucho Marx. Father-in-law to Sir Christopher Guest (Jamie Lee’s husband by the way). He and Jamie Lee helped raise funds for rebuilding the “Great Synagogue” and founded Emanuel Foundation for Hungarian Culture that helps restore synagogues and Jewish cemeteries in Hungary, which he dedicated to the 60,000 Hungarian Jews who died in the Holocaust. Also helped promote Hungary’s national image in commercials. Worked to rescue horses from slaughterhouses. Wrote 2 books. Enjoyed painting and made it a second career since the early 1980s. Work commands more than $25,000. Jerry Lewis attended his first wedding as a witness.

26. Kirk Douglas

Kirk Douglas was one of the most versatile actors of his generation playing in westerns, drama, film, noir and even Disney movies. Also, played famous figures like Doc Holliday, Vincent van Gogh, and Spartacus. He even has a book called I Am Spartacus. Sure he should've won an Oscar but he was burned by the competition.

Kirk Douglas was one of the most versatile actors of his generation playing in westerns, drama, film, noir and even Disney movies. Also, played famous figures like Doc Holliday, Vincent van Gogh, and Spartacus. He even has a book called I Am Spartacus. Sure he should’ve won an Oscar but he was burned by the competition. Still, I can tell STARZ to screw themselves for Kirk Douglas will always be Spartacus to me.

Personal Life: (1916-present) Born Issur Danielovitch Demsky in Amsterdam New York to Yiddish speaking Jewish immigrants from Russia. Father was a ragman. Sold snacks to mill workers as a boy to help his struggling family. Talked his way into attending St. Lawrence University where he paid his tuition through working as a janitor, gardener, and wrestling one summer at a carnival. Said he wanted to be an actor as a kid. Attended the American Academy of Dramatic Arts on a scholarship. Changed his name to Kirk Douglas before entering the Navy during WWII and was medically discharged in 1944 due to injuries. Made his Hollywood debut in 1946. Married twice and fathered 4 sons (2 with Dill and 2 with Anne) including Michael Douglas with his first wife Diana Dill. Married to second wife Anne Buydens for 60 years as of 2015. Suffered a severe stroke in 1996s which took his voice though he partially regained his ability to speak. Will be 100 in 2016 if he’s still alive by then. Retired in 2003.
Famous for: American actor, producer, and author with his cinematic career spanning 50 years. Now is one of the last remaining stars of the Golden Age of Hollywood as well as the highest ranked person on AFI’s list of Greatest Male Stars. Known for playing tough guys and demonstrating an independent streak that he broke studio contracts to gain control over his projects. Formed his own movie company Bryna Productions named after his mother. Was a major box office star in the 1950s and 1960s and appeared in 7 films with Burt Lancaster. Notable roles are Walter O’ Neil from The Strange Love of Martha Ivers, Whit Sterling from Out of the Past, George Phipps from A Letter to Three Wives, Michael “Midge” Kelly from Champion, Jim O’Connor from The Glass Menagerie, Chuck Tatum from Ace in the Hole, Jonathan Shields from The Bad and the Beautiful, Ned Land from 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, Vincent van Gogh from Lust for Life, Doc Holliday from Gunfight at the O. K. Corral, Colonel Dax from Paths of Glory, Richard “Dick” Dudgeon from The Devil’s Disciple, Spartacus, Colonel Jiggs Casey from Seven Days in May, and so many others.
Nominated for: Nominated 3 times for Best Actor consisting of 1949 for Champion, 1952 for The Bad and the Beautiful, and 1956 for Lust for Life.
Most Crushing Loss: Though I can’t blame Douglas for losing to guys like Broderick Crawford, Gary Cooper, and Yul Brynner, I think his most crushing loss was not being nominated for Best Actor for Spartacus. At least he received an Honorary Oscar in the 1990s and at least his son Michael won 2 (as an actor and producer).
Reasons: Well, he was most likely burned by the competition yet he also demonstrated an independent streak and broke many studio contracts just to have control over his own projects. Also, his role in ending the Hollywood Blacklist might’ve been a reason Spartacus didn’t get the nominations it should.
Trivia: Was a classmate of Lauren Bacall who helped him land his first film role. Father-in-law to Catherine Zeta Jones. Has written 11 books. Embraced Judaism after surviving a helicopter crash in 1991, which killed 2 other people. Presented the Best Supporting Actress Oscar to Melissa Leo for The Fighter. Blogs semi-regularly and is believed to be the oldest celebrity blogger in the known world. Played an important role in ending the Hollywood Blacklist when he insisted that Dalton Trumbo be credited under his real name for his screenplay for Spartacus. Played a 4 spring banjo on The Jack Benny Program. Starred in One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest on Broadway and gave the rights to his son Michael. In 1986, he and Angela Lansbury co-hosted the New York Philharmonic’s tribute to the 100th anniversary of the Statue of Liberty. And an autobiographical one man show in 2009.

27. Vincent Price

Vincent Price is one of the most famous horror movie legends of all time as well as among one of the most imitated movie stars. He may have played villains, but he was a generally warm person with a quirky sense of humor who loved children and donated his art collection because he believed in the importance of public access to fine art.

Vincent Price is one of the most famous horror movie legends of all time as well as among one of the most imitated movie stars. He may have played villains, but he was a generally warm person with a quirky sense of humor who loved children and donated his art collection because he believed in the importance of public access to fine art.

Personal Life: (1911-1993) Born in St. Louis. Father was president of the National Candy Company while grandfather invented “Dr. Price’s Baking Powder,” the first cream of tartar baking powder. In 1933, he graduated from Yale in art history. Began his theatrical career in 1935 and performed with Orson Welles’ Mercury Theater Company. Married 3 times. Had a son to first wife Edith Barrett and a daughter to second wife Mary Grant Price. Was a lifelong smoker who suffered from emphysema, lung cancer, and Parkinson’s. Died of lung cancer at 82.
Famous for: American actor well known for his distinctive voice as well as for his serio-comic performances in a series of horror films during the latter part his career. Was originally a character actor. Made his first horror film in 1939. Notable roles are Duke of Clarence from Tower of London, Clifford Pyncheon from The House of the Seven Gables, Prosecutor Vital Dutour from The Song of Bernadette, Shelby Carpenter from Laura, Angus Mealey from The Keys to the Kingdom, Sir Walter Raleigh from The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex, Russell Quinton from Leave Her to Heaven, Nicholas Van Ryn from Dragonwyck, James Reavis from The Baron of Arizona, Professor Henry Jarrod from House of Wax, Baka from The Ten Commandments, Frederick Loren from House on Haunted Hill, Dr. Erasmus Craven from The Raven, Matthew Hopkins from Witchfinder General, Professor Ratigan from The Great Mouse Detective, the Inventor from Edward Scissorhands, Mr. Maranov from The Whales of August, and so many characters from horror movies.
Nominated for: Price was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Never securing a nomination for The Song of Bernadette for Best Supporting Actor or some of his horror movies.
Reasons: Even during the horror heyday during the Golden Age of Hollywood, horror movies weren’t taken as a serious art form. And since most new horror movies are slasher films now, that’s probably not going to change.
Trivia: Was an art aficionado and collector who opened a gallery with Edward G. Robinson and sold 50,000 pieces of fine art to the general public including works by Rembrandt, Picasso, and Dali to between 1962 and 1971. Also donated hundreds of artworks and money to the East Los Angeles College in the early 1960s to endow the Vincent Price Art Museum there. Worked as a consultant to Sears Roebuck in the early 1960s, which he saw it as an opportunity to bring art to the American public. Did a monologue in Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” as well as a voiceover in Alice Cooper’s, “Welcome to my Nightmare” as well as for other groups like Deep Purple. Hosted the PBS show Mystery! From 1981 to 1989. In a 1950 NBC Radio production he denounced racial and religious prejudice as a form of poison and claimed Americans must actively fight against it because racial and religious prejudice within the United States fuels support for the nation’s enemies Despite being a Democrat, was appointed to the Indian Arts and Crafts Board under President Dwight D. Eisenhower (yet he was perfect for the job since he was such a big art fan and collector). Converted to Catholicism to please his 3rd wife Australian Carol Browne who then in turn became a US citizen for him. Performed the eulogy at Peter Lorre’s funeral. Though he usually played bad guys, was a generally a warm person with a quirky sense of humor and took pains to make sure children weren’t frightened by him when performing alongside them. Wrote and published several cookbooks.

28. Gene Tierney

While Gene Tierney was known for her great beauty and superb acting talent in movies like Laura, The Razor's Edge, and Leave Her to Heaven, she experienced a lot with having a severely disabled daughter due to contracting rubella from a fan, undergoing shock treatments while being institutionalized for depression, and her failed marriage to Oleg Cassini.

While Gene Tierney was known for her great beauty and superb acting talent in movies like Laura, The Razor’s Edge, and Leave Her to Heaven, she experienced a lot with having a severely disabled daughter due to contracting rubella from a fan, undergoing shock treatments while being institutionalized for depression, and her failed marriage to Oleg Cassini.

Personal Life: (1920-1991) Born in Brooklyn, New York City. Father was a successful insurance broker and mother a former gym teacher. Attended schools in Connecticut and Europe. Debuted in society at 17 and pursued acting in Greenwich Village, studying at a small studio. Debuted on Broadway in 1938 and made her first film in 1940. Married twice and had 2 daughters with first husband Oleg Cassini. Married to second husband Howard W. Lee for 21 years. Had a daughter who was severely disabled due to contracting rubella from a fan while pregnant with her. Suffered from depression and saw a psychiatrist as well as went through 27 shock treatments. May have tried to jump out of a 14 story ledge and was institutionalized. Retired in 1980. Died from emphysema at 70.
Famous for: American actress, acclaimed as a great beauty. Notable roles are Ellie Mae Lester from Tobacco Road, Belle Starr, Martha Strabel Van Cleve from Heaven Can Wait, Laura Hunt from Laura, Ellen Brent Harland from Leave Her to Heaven, Lucy Muir from The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, Ann Sutton from Whirlpool, Miranda Wells Van Ryn from Dragonwyck, Isabel Bradley Maturin from The Razor’s Edge, Mary Bristol from Night and the City, Morgan Taylor (Payne) from Where the Sidewalk Ends, Maggie Carleton McNulty from The Mating Season, Dorothy Bradford from Plymouth Adventure, Baketamon from The Egyptian, Anne Scott from The Left Hand of God, and Dolly Harrison from Advise and Consent.
Nominated for: Tierney was nominated for Best Actress in 1945 for Leave Her to Heaven.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actress in 1946 for The Razor’s Edge. Boy, if anyone can play a bad girlfriend, it was her.
Reasons: Tierney struggled for years with depression which sometimes kept her from doing her job as an actress such as concentrating and sometimes dropped out of projects due to stress. She was also institutionalized on 2 occasions. And at one time, Humphrey Bogart helped feed her lines during the making of The Left Hand of God. She was just an emotional wreck. Also, when nominated for Leave Her to Heaven she was simply burned by the competition because there was no way she was going to win against Joan Crawford.
Trivia: Named after her uncle who died young. Wrote poetry. Spoke fluent French. Romantically linked to Spencer Tracy and John F. Kennedy. Became an outspoken opponent against shock treatments, claiming that they destroyed significant portions of her memory. The Mirror Crack’d was partially based on an incident in her life with her daughter. Was friends with Howard Hughes who paid for her daughter Daria’s care. Second husband was once married to Hedy Lamarr.

29. Lew Ayres

While he achieved stardom at 22 for playing war weary WWI soldier Paul Baumer in the heartbreaking coming of age story All Quiet on the Western Front, his career dealt a blow while he tried to apply for CO status during WWII. Despite that he served with distinction as a medic in the Pacific, his career would never recover.

While he achieved stardom at 22 for playing a war weary WWI soldier Paul Baumer in the heartbreaking coming of age story All Quiet on the Western Front, Lew Ayres dealt a blow to his star while he tried to apply for CO status during WWII. Despite that he served with distinction as a medic in the Pacific, his career would never recover.

Personal Life: (1908-1996) Born in Minneapolis, Minnesota. At 4, his parents divorced. Father was an amateur musician and court reporter. As a teenager moved to San Diego with his mother and stepfather. After dropping out of high school, he started a band which traveled to Mexico. Played banjo and guitar for big bands and recorded one of the earliest Vitaphone movie shorts with the Henry Halstead Orchestra. Eventually pursued acting full time. Married 3 times with Ginger Rogers as his second wife. Had one son to third wife Diana Hall whom he was married to for 32 years. Died of complications from a coma at 88.
Famous for: American Actor best known for playing Dr. Kildare in 9 movies and Paul Baumer in All Quiet on the Western Front. Spent a time typecast as doctors. Career spanned nearly 65 years. Notable roles are Paul Baumer from All Quiet on the Western Front, Dr. Kildare from the series’ first 9 movies, Ned from Holiday, Dr. Scott Elliott from Dark Mirror, Pat Gilbert from State Fair, Larry Hannaford from The Unfaithful, Dr. Robert Richardson from Johnny Belinda, and Vice President Harley Hudson from Advise & Consent.
Nominated for: Ayres was only nominated for Best Actor in 1948 for Johnny Belinda.
Most Crushing Loss: Not getting at least an Oscar nomination for Best Actor for All Quiet on the Western Front. For playing a young German soldier who loses all his friends and becomes alienated from the world outside the WWI trenches, his performance is utterly heartbreaking and should’ve won.
Reasons: In 1930, he was only 22 and early in his film career which is understandable. Yet, after filming All Quiet on the Western Front, he became an ardent pacifist and caused tremendous public outcry when he applied for CO 4E status. Though he eventually settled in serving as a medic in the Pacific with heroic distinction and enjoyed a comeback after the war, he would never reach the peak of his Hollywood stardom in his early years. Still, if it weren’t for his impressive war record, his conscientious objector stance would’ve destroyed his career.
Trivia: It’s said that Jane Wyman dumped Ronald Reagan for him but their affair was brief. During WWII, he was one of 16 medics who arrived during the invasion of Leyte to set up evacuation hospitals under fire as well as provided care for soldiers and civilians in the Philippines and New Guinea. After serving 3 ½ years in the Medical Corps, he won 3 battle stars and donated his service money to the American Red Cross. Is buried next to Frank Zappa. Was a believer in eastern philosophy and directed a 1976 documentary called Altars of the World. Was turned down and to play Dr. Kildare on TV after because he requested there be no cigarette advertising on the show in 1961.

30. Rock Hudson

During the 1950s, Rock Hudson was a popular leading man with legions of female fans. However, we all know that he wasn't interested in any one of them since he was gay and would become the first major celebrity to die from AIDS. Also it was an open secret in Hollywood that his 3 year marriage to Phyllis Gates was a publicity stunt.

During the 1950s, Rock Hudson was a popular leading man with legions of female fans. However, we all know that he wasn’t interested in any one of them since he was gay and would become the first major celebrity to die from AIDS. Also it was an open secret in Hollywood that his 3 year marriage to Phyllis Gates was a publicity stunt.

Personal Life: (1925-1985) Born Roy Scherer Jr. in Winnetka, Illinois. Mother was a telephone operator and father was an auto mechanic who deserted the family during the Great Depression. Stepfather adopted him and changed his name to Fitzgerald. Delivered newspapers, ran errands, and worked as a golf caddy. After graduating high school, he served as a US Navy aircraft mechanic in the Philippines during WWII. In 1946, he moved to Los Angeles and tried to study acting at USC but was rejected for poor grades. When discovered by future agent Henry Willson, he was working as a truck driver. Though he used Rock Hudson as a stage name, he hated it. Was married for 3 years to his agent’s secretary Phyllis Gates but it was a publicity used to conceal his sexual orientation when Confidential Magazine threatened to expose him. Had at least 3 known lovers (not including Jim Nabors) and was a heavy smoker and drinker for years. Died from AIDS at 59 and was the first major celebrity to die from the disease.
Famous for: American actor who was known as a leading man during the 1950s and 1960s, notably in romantic comedies with Doris Day as well as serious dramatic roles. Career spanned nearly 40 years and 70 films as well as several TV productions. Notable roles are Bob Merrick from Magnificent Obsession, Jordan “Bick” Benedict, Jr. from Giant, Ron Kirby from All that Heaven Allows, Mitch Wayne from Written on the Wind, Lt. Frederick Henry from Farewell to Arms, Brad Allen from Pillow Talk, Michael “Tiger” McDrew from Pretty Maids All in a Row, and Jason Rudd from The Mirror Crack’d.
Nominated for: Hudson was nominated for Best Actor in 1956 for Giant (which was well deserved).
Most Crushing Loss: Basically not receiving any film award from a gay rights organization (which didn’t exist in public until the 1960s) or being nominated for Best Actor for Pillow Talk in which he plays a straight guy pretending to be gay. As for losing the Oscar for Giant, well, he was facing tough competition.
Reasons: In case you don’t know, he was gay and his sexual orientation was an open secret in Hollywood for years.
Trivia: Was a good friend to Ronald and Nancy Reagan who called him personally in his Paris hospital room where he was being treated for AIDS and made sure he had the best possible care available. Kissing Linda Evans on Dynasty led to widespread panic in the TV industry when it was revealed that he had AIDS during that time, too, but she suffered from no ill effects. Appeared in a cigarette commercial. Contrary to rumors, he and Jim Nabors were never more than just good friends (and Nabors was in a committed relationship with another man whom he eventually married in 2013).

Movie Stars Who Have Never Won an Oscar: Part 2 – Richard Widmark to Peter Lorre

William Powell and Myrna Loy were among one of Hollywood's most famous onscreen couples starring in 14 films together during the 1930s and 1940s. However, their most famous pairing has to be in the six Thin Man movies in which they play America's favorite pair of wealthy, alcoholic, and crime solving pet owners Nick and Nora Charles.

William Powell and Myrna Loy were among one of Hollywood’s most famous onscreen couples starring in 14 films together during the 1930s and 1940s. However, their most famous pairing has to be in the six Thin Man movies in which they play America’s favorite pair of wealthy, alcoholic, and crime solving pet owners Nick and Nora Charles.

Of course, my last post was quite long. However, I promise that my later posts in this series won’t take up as much space as the last one since the first one was just introductory. Not to mention, there will be some star profiles that won’t be quite as long. Now this selection pertains to some other famous screen legends you may or may not be familiar with. Yet, they weren’t as noteworthy as the previous ten you’ve just seen. To start off, you have two pioneering African American actresses Dorothy Dandridge and Lena Horne who’ve both achieved fame as black leading ladies during segregation and Jim Crow. Then we have William Powell and Myrna Loy who appeared in 14 films together but are best known as the Dashiell Hammett characters Nick and Nora Charles. Next, you have Richard Widmark and Fred MacMurray who both usually play nice guys but their greatest performances usually consist them playing evil men. After that you have legendary song and dance man Gene Kelly as well as 6 time Academy Award loser Deborah Kerr best known for playing Boris Karloff’s great-aunt from The King and I (I’m not kidding, look it up). Then you have Swedish actress Greta Garbo best known for her sexual allure, husky Swedish voice, and her reclusive nature after she retired in the 1940s. And finally, there’s the one and only Peter Lorre best known for being one of the creepiest men on earth as well as having a voice cartoons have imitated ever since. So for your pleasure, here are 10 more movie stars who never made their Oscar speech after being announced for beating their fellow nominees during the ceremony.

11. Richard Widmark

Richard Widmark's portrayal of Tommy Udo in Kiss of Death in which he pushes a poor wheelchair bound woman down the stairs has been ranked as one of the greatest villains in movie history as well as an inspiration for the Joker in Batman. Unfortunately, when nominated around Oscar time, Academy voters weren't very comfortable with having a guy win the Best Supporting Actor price to a man playing a complete psycho so they gave the Oscar to a man playing Santa Claus.

Richard Widmark’s portrayal of Tommy Udo in Kiss of Death in which he pushes a poor wheelchair bound woman down the stairs has been ranked as one of the greatest villains in movie history as well as an inspiration for the Joker in Batman. Unfortunately, when nominated around Oscar time, Academy voters weren’t very comfortable with having a guy win the Best Supporting Actor prize to a man playing a complete psycho. So they gave the Oscar to a man playing Santa Claus.

Personal Life: (1914-2008) Born in Sunrise Township, Minnesota and grew up in Princeton, Illinois. Father was a traveling salesman of Swedish ancestry. Studied and taught acting at Lake Forest College. First acting jobs were for radio in the late 1930s and early 1940s. Debuted on Broadway in 1943 and film in 1947. Married for 45 years to Jean Hazelwood and had a daughter married to Sandy Colfax from 1969-1982. In 1999, he married Susan Blanchard, the former 3rd Mrs. Henry Fonda and stepdaughter to Oscar Hammerstein II. Retired in 2001 and died in Roxbury, Connecticut after a long illness 7 years later at 93.
Famous for: American actor originally typecast as villains or antiheros in film noir but later branched out into leading and support heroic roles in westerns, mainstream dramas, and horror films among others. Notable roles are Tommy Udo from Kiss of Death, Dude from Yellow Sky, Harry Fabian from Night and the City, Ray Biddle from No Way Out, Jim Bowie from The Alamo, Col. Tad Lawson from Judgment at Nuremberg, Captain Thomas Archer from Cheyenne Autumn, and Ratchet/Cassetti from Murder on the Orient Express as well as countless cowboys, gangsters, police officers, and military men.
Nominated for: Only nominated as Best Supporting Actor in 1947 for Kiss of Death.
Most Crushing Loss: Sure Widmark may have had stiff competition against Edmund Gwenn and Robert Ryan in 1947, but you have to admit playing a complete psycho and losing the Oscar race to Santa Claus as particularly humiliating. Still, his Tommy Udo might’ve been the inspiration for Heath Ledger’s Joker from The Dark Knight and is every bit as villainous. It’s no question he should’ve won.
Reasons: For one, Kiss of Death was Widmark’s first film. Secondly, I’m not sure if the Hollywood establishment was ready to award an Oscar for to an actor playing a psychopathic gangster who pushes a wheelchair bound woman down the stairs just for giggles. He was also subject to a lot of typecasting afterwards.
Trivia: Was a big Batman fan and his Tommy Udo performance might’ve inspired the Joker. Had a ranch during the 1950s and 1960s near Green City, Missouri where he raised funds for an airport named in honor. Despite that his characters were mostly armed, was as staunch supporter of gun control.

12. Fred MacMurray

Fred MacMurray is probably best known by your baby boomer parents as playing the kind single dad from My Three Sons. Of course, while mostly playing nice guys, he did play a few not so wholesome characters in movies like The Apartment, The Caine Mutiny, and Double Indemnity. See my thing about these roles in my post on bad movie bosses.

Fred MacMurray is probably best known by your baby boomer parents as playing the kind single dad from My Three Sons. Of course, while mostly playing nice guys, he did play a few not so wholesome characters in movies like The Apartment, The Caine Mutiny, and Double Indemnity. See my thing about these roles in my post on bad movie bosses.

Personal Life: (1908-1991) Born in Kankakee, Illinois and grew up in his mother’s hometown of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. Attended Carroll College on a full scholarship but didn’t graduate though he participated in local bands and even played the saxophone. Before Hollywood, he’d recorded songs as a featured vocalist for the Gus Arnheim Orchestra as well as with Bob Hope and Sydney Greenstreet on Broadway. Married twice but was never divorced. Adopted 2 children with first wife Lillian Lamont and adopted twin girls with second wife June Haver to whom he was married to for 37 years. Retired in 1978. Suffered throat cancer in the 1970s and late 1980s. Suffered from a severe stroke in 1988 which left his right side paralyzed though he managed a 90% with therapy. Died of pneumonia at 83 after a battle with leukemia for over a decade.
Famous for: American actor who appeared in more than 100 films and a successful TV show during a career spanning nearly half a century. Originally typecast nice guys in romantic comedies, melodramas, and musicals, he broke that with Double Indemnity as well as played outright scumbags in The Caine Mutiny and The Apartment. Spent a lot of his later career making Disney movies. Notable roles are Arthur Russell from Alice Adams, Walter Neff from Double Indemnity, Lt. Tom Keefer from The Caine Mutiny, Jeff Sheldrake from The Apartment, Wilson Daniels from The Shaggy Dog, and Professor Ned Brainard from The Absent-Minded Professor. Also known for playing the Steven Douglas from My Three Sons.
Nominated for: Murray was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actor in The Caine Mutiny (also the same for Jose Ferrer as well) or The Apartment. Also, not being nominated for Double Indemnity for Best Actor. Often said that his best roles were when he played against type.
Reasons: For one, he spent his early career being typecast and I’m sure playing assholes didn’t go well with the Hollywood establishment at the time. Also, made Disney movies.
Trivia: Said to be one of the wealthiest actors in Hollywood mostly because he had a reputation for being cheap as well as bringing a brown paper bag lunch with a hard-boiled egg, sometimes a leftover dyed one from Easter. Was also a skillful investor in California real estate. Appeared in commercials for Greyhound and Korean chesinbop math calculation program. Insisted that all his scenes for My Three Sons be filmed first so he could have plenty of time making movies and playing golf. Established the MacMurray Ranch in Northern California where he raised prize winning Aberdeen Angus cattle. Sold the ranch to Gallo in 1996 which planted vineyards for wine sold in the MacMurray Ranch name. First person honored as a Disney Legend in 1987. Played saxophone on The Jack Benny Program.

13. Lena Horne

Lena Horne is better known for her singing career and civil rights activisim. Yet, she's one of the first big African American female movie stars who refused to play maids her movie career during Jim Crow. Of course, being a black woman, that's a reason why she made so few.

Lena Horne is better known for her singing career and civil rights activisim. Yet, she’s one of the first big African American female movie stars who refused to play maids her movie career during Jim Crow. Of course, being a black woman, that’s a reason why she made so few.

Personal Life: (1917-2010) Born in Bedford-Stuyvesant in Brooklyn, New York City. Father was a numbers kingpin and gambler. Mother was an actress from a black theater troupe. Lived in New York, Pittsburgh, Georgia, and Pennsylvania. Moved to Pittsburgh at 18 and lived there for 5 years until she joined the Cotton Club as a chorus girl. Made her first film in 1938 and her first recording some time before that. Married twice and had 2 children to her first husband Louis Jordan. Second husband was a white man named Lennie Hayton for 24 years (yet they separated in the 1960s and she said she only married him to advance her career but she loved him very much). Retired in 1980. Died in New York City of heart failure at 92.
Famous for: American singer, actress, dancer, and civil rights activist. From a Cotton Club chorus girl at 16 and nightclub performer before moving to Hollywood where he had both bit and substantial roles. Notable roles are Ethel Andrews from The Duke Is Tops, Georgia Brown from Cabin in the Sky, and Glinda the Good from The Wiz.
Nominated for: Horne was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not receiving an honorary Oscar for lifetime achievement due to making so few films. Yet, I really think she should’ve gotten one since she refused to play maids.
Reasons: She was black. She refused to play maids (which really limited the quantity of movies she made). And she found herself blacklisted for a time due to her left leaning views and civil rights activism during the Red Scare that she only made 2 movies during the 1950s.
Trivia: Uncle was an adviser to Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Granddaughter of inventor Samuel R. Scottron. Refused to perform to segregated audiences and was only able to do a show for the US during WWII in front of African American servicemen and German POWs. Lost her father, husband, and son in the same year. Worked with Eleanor Roosevelt to pass anti-lynching laws. Spoke and performed during the March on Washington. Was not thrilled about the potential prospect of Janet Jackson playing her in a biopic, especially after her 2004 Super Bowl wardrobe malfunction. Granddaughter was the screenwriter for Rachel Getting Married. Daughter became a best-selling author.

14. Dorothy Dandridge

Dorothy Dandridge was the first African American woman nominated for a Best Actress Academy Award in the 1950s. However, her life was rather tragic with failed marriages, a special needs kid, substance abuse, and financial troubles. And despite her success in Carmen Jones, her career would decline because the racist climate at the time didn't allow her access to very good leading or possibly supporting roles.

Dorothy Dandridge was the first African American woman nominated for a Best Actress Academy Award in the 1950s. However, her life was rather tragic with failed marriages, a special needs kid, substance abuse, and financial troubles. And despite her success in Carmen Jones, her career would decline because the racist climate at the time didn’t allow her access to very good leading or possibly supporting roles.

Personal Life: (1922-1965) Born in Cleveland. Mother was an aspiring entertainer. Father was a cabinet maker and minister. Mother created a song and dance act for her and her 2 sisters called “The Wonder Children” who appeared in nightclubs for several years as well as later became The Dandridge Sisters. Made her first film in 1935. Married twice and had a daughter to first husband Harold Nicholas. Second husband was a white man, abuser, and gold digger who used all her money before abandoning her. Was swindled by those who handled her finances of $150,000 and was in $139,000 debt in back taxes that she was forced to sell her Hollywood home. Daughter was officially diagnosed with brain damage but was probably autistic (problems were associated with social and verbal skills) and eventually sent to a state mental institution when she couldn’t afford to keep her. Was also plagued by drinking problems later in life. Died either of an embolism or drug overdose at 42.
Famous for: American actress, singer, and dancer. Mostly appeared in uncredited roles before stardom. Notable roles are Dorothy from Teachers Beau, Thalia from Bahama Passage, Kipsang’s Bride from Sundown, Felice from Lady from Louisiana, Melmendi, Queen of the Ashuba from Tarzan’s Peril, Jane Richards from Bright Road, Ann Carpenter from The Harlem Globetrotters, Carmen Jones, Margot Seaton from Island in the Sun, Aiché, Reiker’s mistress from Tamango, Mahia from The Decks Ran Red, Bess from Porgy and Bess, and Gianna from Malaga.
Nominated for: Dandridge was nominated for Best Actress in 1954 for Carmen Jones.
Most Crushing Loss: Losing to Grace Kelly for Best Actress in 1954. Sure I know she wasn’t going to win but she should’ve at least lost to Judy Garland. Yet, what’s more crushing about this is that she was probably the nominee who received the least amount of votes which was probably due to her skin color.
Reasons: Most of the time, African American actresses nominated for Best Actress usually never win, even today with the sole exception of Halle Berry in 2002. Since Dandridge was nominated for Best Actress during segregation in the 1950s, her race was an even bigger mark against her. Not to mention, the Hollywood Studio System and the Hays Code made it even more difficult for her to get any good non-stereotypical parts as well. Her career also declined after her nomination.
Trivia: First African American actress nominated for an Oscar in a leading role. She and Maureen O’Hara were the only two stars who testified against Hollywood Research Inc. for libel, a tabloid magazine company that gave blatantly false accounts of them having casual sex with multiple individuals. Was romantically linked to Otto Preminger.

15. William Powell

William Powell may not have been a handsome leading man, but his voice and fashion sense made him perfect in movies like My Man Godfrey and The Thin Man series. Was married and divorced to Carole Lombard, engaged to Jean Harlow, and starred with Myrna Loy in 14 films (though they never dated in real life).

William Powell may not have been a handsome leading man, but his voice and fashion sense made him perfect in movies like My Man Godfrey and The Thin Man series. Was married and divorced to Carole Lombard, engaged to Jean Harlow, and starred with Myrna Loy in 14 films (though they never dated in real life).

Personal Life: (1892-1984) Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania but attended high school in St. Louis, Missouri where lived a few blocks away from his future fiancée Jean Harlow’s family whom he didn’t meet until after they were established actors. Attended the American Academy for Dramatic Arts after graduating high school and got his start on vaudeville, stock companies, and Broadway. Married 3 times with his second marriage being to Carole Lombard (yet even though they divorced after 2 years, he was still devastated when she died in a 1942 plane crash). Had a son who became a producer and writer to Eileen Wilson. Yet his son would commit suicide in 1968. Married to Diana Lewis for 44 years. As far as his personal life goes, he’s best known for marrying Carole Lombard and dating Jean Harlow. Survived a bout of cancer in 1937. Retired from acting in 1955. Died from heart failure at 91.
Famous for: American actor who typically played highly self-confident characters, with sophistication and sense of wit. Originally started acting in movies in 1922 mostly playing in a supporting capacity until talkies. Made 14 films with Myrna Loy including the six Thin Man films. Notable roles are Nick Charles from the Thin Man series, Godfrey Parke from My Man Godfrey, Lev Andreyev from The Last Command, Philo Vance from The Canary Murder Case, Bill Chandler from Libeled Lady, George Carey from I Love You Again, Clarence Day Sr. from Life with Father. J. D. Hanley from How to Marry a Millionaire, and Lt. “Doc” from Mister Roberts.
Nominated for: Powell was nominated 3 times for Best Actor consisting of: 1934 for The Thin Man, 1936 for My Man Godfrey, and 1948 for Life with Father.
Most Crushing Loss: It’s hard to say Oscar wise since he lost to guys like Clark Gable, Paul Muni (whose Oscar was long overdue), and Ronald Colman who were all very talented actors. Yet, what probably stings the most is that he died at 91 without an honorary Oscar for Lifetime Achievement.
Reasons: Most of Powell’s films were comedies, which doesn’t win Oscars even today. Not to mention, being burned by the competition whenever he was nominated.
Trivia: Married wife #3 after knowing her for 3 weeks (luckily this one worked out). Said to place a white gardenia and unsigned note reading, “Good night, my dearest darling” in Jean Harlow’s hands before she was interred in the $25,000 9 x 10-ft private room he paid for in the “Sanctuary of Benediction” of the Great Mausoleum at Forest Lawn Memorial Park (then again, she was the love of his life).

16. Gene Kelly

Gene Kelly is noted to have said, "If Fred Astaire is the Cary Grant of dance, I'm the Marlon Brando." Of course, he's best known for his contributions to the Hollywood musical. Yet, unlike Fred Astaire, he ceased being relevant after film musicals fell out of fashion in the late 1950s.

Gene Kelly is noted to have said, “If Fred Astaire is the Cary Grant of dance, I’m the Marlon Brando.” Of course, he’s best known for his contributions to the Hollywood musical. Yet, unlike Fred Astaire, he ceased being relevant after film musicals fell out of fashion in the late 1950s.

Personal Life: (1912-1996) Born Eugene Curran Kelly in the East Liberty in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Father was a phonograph salesman. Mother made him and his brother James take dance lessons. Graduated high school at 16. Attended Penn State for journalism but dropped out to help his family due to the crash of 1929. He and his brother Fred performed in local talent contests for prizes and nightclubs. Studied economics at the University of Pittsburgh, member of Phi Beta Kappa and the Cap and Gown Club, and was admitted to Pitt Law School (but dropped out after 2 months). Also worked as a dance teacher in his family dance studio at Squirrel Hill for 7 years soon called the Gene Kelly School of Dance. Started his show biz career on Broadway and the stage before signing on to David O. Selznick. Married 3 times with Betsey Blair as his first wife. Had 3 children including a daughter to Blair as well as a daughter and son to second wife Jeanne Coyne. Retired in 1994 due to a stroke and would die in his sleep at 83.
Famous for: American dancer, actor, singer, film director, producer, and choreographer. A dominant force in Hollywood musical films from the mid-1940s until it fell out of fashion in the late 1950s. His many innovations transformed the Hollywood musical film and is almost single handedly credited with making ballet form commercially acceptable to audiences. Notable roles are Joseph Brady from Anchors Aweigh, D’Artagnan from The Three Musketeers (1948), Joe D. Ross from Summer Stock, Gabey from On the Town, Jerry Mulligan from An American in Paris, Don Lockwood from Singin’ in the Rain, Tommy Albright from Brigadoon, Ted Riley from It’s Always Fair Weather, E. K. Hornbeck from Inherit the Wind, Barry Nichols from Les Girls, and Danny McGuire from Xanadu.
Nominated for: He was only nominated for Best Actor in 1945 for Anchors Aweigh. Luckily he received an honorary Oscar for 1952.
Most Crushing Loss: The fact that Singin’ in the Rain managed to only be nominated for 2 Oscars and didn’t win either in 1952. This is one of the best musicals of all time and should at least set a record Academy Award nominations at the time. Not to mention, Kelly shouldn’t have been snubbed for Best Actor or Best Director with Stanley Donen. Also, the fact that Pittsburgh still won’t erect that fucking statue of him (c’mon, just do it already).
Reasons: Well, this might’ve been due to Kelly’s politics as well as that by the Red Scare he basically threatened MGM that he’d pull out from It’s Always Fair Weather if his wife Blair didn’t get the lead female role in Marty. At the time, she was under considerable pressure to withdraw from the American Legion because she was suspected as a Communist sympathizer. Still, 1950s film awards were the stuff of brutal competition. Not to mention, Kelly’s glory days were over by 1960.
Trivia: Stopped attending Mass when the Catholic Church sided with the Nationalists during the Spanish Civil War in 1939 (then again, the other side wasn’t much better). But he was said to have donated money to the IRA during the 1970s. Was a huge Pittsburgh Pirates fan (and had a childhood dream of playing shortstop for the team). Him and Blair held weekly parties with an intensely physical completion of charades they called, “The Game.” Part of the Committee for the First Amendment that protested during the House Committees on Un-American Activities hearings. The Pittsburgh Civic Light Opera has an award named after him.

17. Myrna Loy

Though best known as playing William Powell's wife in The Thin Man series and 8 other films, Myrna Loy was a highly popular actress in her own right during the 1930s that she was known as "The Queen of Hollywood." She was also John Dillinger's favorite actress. Yet, she also championed causes for military veterans and black actors, fought housing discrimination, and was the first Hollywood celebrity to become a member of UNESCO.

Though best known as playing William Powell’s wife in The Thin Man series and 8 other films, Myrna Loy was a highly popular actress in her own right during the 1930s that she was known as “The Queen of Hollywood.” She was also John Dillinger’s favorite actress. Yet, she also championed causes for military veterans and black actors, fought housing discrimination, and was the first Hollywood celebrity to become a member of UNESCO.

Personal Life: (1905-1993) Born Myrna Adele Williams in Helena, Montana. Father was banker, real estate developer, and youngest man ever elected to the Montana state legislature. Spent her childhood living between Montana and California and took up dancing lessons. Made her stage debut at Helena’s Operetta Theater at 12. Father died of Spanish flu, in 1918 and family moved to California permanently. Performed at Grauman’s Chinese Theater at 18. Was discovered by Rudolph Valentino when he was looking for a co-star in Cobra while both visited a photography studio. Made her first film in 1925. Married 4 times. Had 2 mastectomies for breast cancer in 1970s. Died from surgical complications at 88.
Famous for: American actor, once trained as a dancer devoted herself fully to an acting career following a few minor roles in silent films. Originally typecast in exotic roles, often as a vamp or a woman of Asian descent, but her career prospects improved greatly following her portrayal of Nora Charles in The Thin Man. Appeared with William Powell in 14 movies. Notable roles are Becky Sharp from Vanity Fair, Fah Lo See from The Mask of Fu Manchu,
Gertie Waxted from Penthouse, Eleanor from Manhattan Melodrama, Nora Charles from The Thin Man series, Linda from Wife vs. Secretary, Connie Allenbury from Libeled Lady, Milly Stephenson from The Best Years of Our Lives, Margaret from The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer, Kay Wilson from I Love You Again, Muriel Blandings from Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House, Alice Tiflin from The Red Pony, Mrs. Lillian Gilbreth from Cheaper By the Dozen, Aunt Bea from Midnight Lace, Mrs. Devaney from Airport 1975, and Maureen Lawson from The End.
Nominated for: Loy was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1946 for The Best Years of Our Lives. Yes, she’s not much of an overburdened wife on the receiving end of her husband’s PTSD yet she’s a wife whose husband can no longer relate to. It’s pretty crushing that she wasn’t nominated for an Academy Award despite all the work she did both on and off screen. It’s nice that she had celebrity friends who lobbied extensively for the Academy to give her an honorary Oscar, which she greatly deserved.
Reasons: Loy is probably one of the most surprisingly underrated Hollywood actresses ever and she was enormously popular in her lifetime even voted as the Queen of Hollywood by her fans in the 1930s while Clark Gable was voted King. Of course, she had a deceptively straightforward artistry that kept her from getting the types of flashy roles that usually netted nominations.
Trivia: Romantically linked to Spencer Tracy and Leslie Howard. Father sold a considerable amount of land to Charlie Chaplin where he constructed his studio. Posed for her high school sculpture in the Fountain of Education, which stood for decades which has been featured in Grease. Was John Dillinger’s favorite actress and was shot to death after seeing one of her films. Worked with the Red Cross during WWII and was so fiercely outspoken against Hitler her name appeared on his blacklist. Also helped run the Naval Auxiliary Canteen and toured to raise funds for the troops. Championed the rights of black actors and characters to be depicted with dignity on film. Was Co-Chairman of the Advisory Council of the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing and the first Hollywood celebrity to become a member of UNESCO in 1948. Had a performing arts center in Helena, Montana named after her. Was a personal friend of Eleanor Roosevelt.

18. Greta Garbo

Greta Garbo was an international superstar in the 1920s and 1930s for her magnetic performances in sometimes mediocre films. But her 1942 retirement and lack of desire for Hollywood publicity have only enhanced her legendary mystique.

Greta Garbo was an international superstar in the 1920s and 1930s for her magnetic performances in sometimes mediocre films. But her 1942 retirement and lack of desire for Hollywood publicity have only enhanced her legendary mystique.

Personal Life: (1905-1990) Born Greta Lovisa Gustafsson in Stockholm, Sweden. Father was a laborer who worked as a street cleaner, grocer, factory worker and butcher’s assistant while her mother soon worked in a jam factory. Was a shy day dreamer as a child who hated school but was interested in theater at an early age. Grew up in the city’s working class district regarded as the municipal slum. Dropped out of school at 13 and never attended high school. Father became ill with Spanish flu in 1919 that resulted in him losing his job and died in 1920. Worked as a soap lather girl in a barbershop and ran errands in the millinery department at the PUB Department Store. Soon started modeling hats and became a fashion model for the store’s catalog. Later filmed commercials advertising the store’s women’s clothing. Studied at The Royal Dramatic Theatre’s Acting School in Stockholm and made her first film in 1924. Was discovered by Louis B. Mayer the next year. Retired in 1941 and spent the rest of her life as a recluse in which made no public appearances. Suffered from depression and moodiness as well as gastrointestinal and periodontal ailments. Became a US citizen in 1951. Was successfully treated for breast cancer in 1984. Died of pneumonia and renal failure at 84.
Famous for: Swedish American actress as well as international star and icon during Hollywood’s silent and classic film periods. Husky Swedish voice gave her an easy transition from silents to talkies. Appeared in 28 films. Notable roles are Elena from The Temptress, Felicitas from Flesh and the Devil, Marianne from The Divine Woman, Tania Fedorova from The Mysterious Lady, Anna Christie, Madame Rita Cavallini from Romance, Mata Hari, Grusinskaya from Grand Hotel, Queen Christina, Katrin Koerber Fane from The Painted Veil, Anna Karenina, Marguerite Gautier from Camille, Countess Marie Walewska from Conquest, Nina Ivanovna “Ninotchka” Yakushova from Ninotchka, and Karin Borg Blake from Two-Faced Woman.
Nominated for: Garbo was nominated 3 times for Best Actress consisting of 1930 for Anna Christie and Romance, 1936 for Camille, and 1939 for Ninotchka.
Most Crushing Loss: Losing to Luise Rainer during the 1936 Best Actress race, since Rainier was a white actress playing a Chinese woman. Garbo really should’ve won that year even if she did play a high class call girl slowly dying of tuberclerosis.
Reasons: Well, she didn’t have a long career and retired at 35 due to the failure of Two-Faced Woman. Not to mention, during her whole career, she signed no autographs, avoided industry social functions, answered no fan mail, refused permission to arrange publicity contracts with the studio, and never made any appearances at awards ceremonies, even when she was nominated. Rumored to be gay or bisexual (which is unproven though she did have lesbian friends and played Queen Christina). Not to mention, she was a 1930s sex symbol.
Trivia: Was unable to speak any English when she first arrived in Hollywood in 1925. Contrary to the conventional reclusive image, she had many friends with whom she socialized and traveled. Was an avid art collector who purchased paintings by Renoir, Rouault, Kandinsky, Bonnard, and Jawlensky which was worth millions when she died. Was a White House dinner guest in 1963. Wore large sunglasses in her later years and was known for taking long walks. Romantically linked to Louise Brooks, John Gilbert, Marlene Dietrich, Josephine Baker, and Mercedes de Acosta. Estate was worth $57,000,000 due to her wise investments in stocks and bonds. Highest paid actress at MGM during most of her career. Designated as the most beautiful woman who ever lived by Guinness Book of World Records.

19. Deborah Kerr

Though Scottish born, Deborah Kerr is best known for playing proper and sophisticated English ladies, particularly in period pieces. Yet, she occasionally played against type since she and Burt Lancaster did have a famous make out scene in From Here to Eternity.

Though Scottish born, Deborah Kerr is best known for playing proper and sophisticated English ladies, particularly in period pieces. Yet, she occasionally played against type since she and Burt Lancaster did have a famous make out scene in From Here to Eternity.

Personal Life: (1921-2007) Born Deborah Jane Kerr-Trimmer in Helensburgh, Scotland. Father was a WWI veteran captain who lost a leg during the Battle of the Somme and later became a naval architect and engineer. Trained as a ballet dancer and first appeared on stage in 1937. Trained in acting by her aunt who ran the Hicks-Smale Drama School in Bristol. Made her West End debut in 1943. Made her first film in 1940. Married twice and had 2 daughters with her first husband Anthony Bartley. Married to second husband Peter Viertel for 47 years (though they lived apart in later years so she could be closer to her children as her health began to deteriorate). Retired in 1986 possibly due to suffering Parkinson’s Disease that would later claim her life at 86.
Famous for: Scottish actress best known for being nominated 6 times for Oscars and never won. Specialized in playing high souled ladies of quality and one of Hollywood’s favorite redheads from the 1940s to 1960s. Made a lot of period films and starred in 4 movies with Robert Mitchum. Notable roles are Jenny Hill from Major Barbara, Edith Hunter/Barbara Wynne/Johnny Cannon from The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, Sister Clodagh from Black Narcissus, Kay Dorrance from The Hucksters, Evelyn Boult from Edward, My Son, Elizabeth Curtis from King Solomon’s Mines, Lygia from Quo Vadis, Princess Flavia from The Prisoner of Zenda, Catherine Parr from Young Bess, Portia from Julius Caesar, Karen Holmes from From Here to Eternity, Anna Leonowens from The King and I, Laura Reynolds from Tea and Sympathy, Sister Angela from Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison, Terry McKay from An Affair to Remember, Sibyl Railton-Bell from Separate Tables, Sarah Miles from The End of the Affair, Sheilah Graham from Beloved Infidel, Miss Giddens from The Innocents, Hannah Jelkes from Night of the Iguana, and Agent Mimi/Lady Fiona McTarry from Casino Royale.
Nominated for: Kerr was nominated for Best Actress 6 times consisting of 1949 for Edward, My Son, 1953 for From Here to Eternity, 1956 for The King and I, 1957 for Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison, 1958 for Separate Tables, and 1960 for The Sundowners.
Most Crushing Loss: Losing to Elizabeth Taylor in 1960 for Best Actress. I mean Taylor is a great actress but Butterfield 8 is one of her more forgettable films. Not to mention, even Taylor felt she only received the Oscar because she had to undergo a tracheotomy. Still, Kerr should’ve at least lost to Shirley MacLaine or Greer Garson. I’d also add losing to Ingrid Bergman in 1956 since Anastasia is perhaps one of the most historically inaccurate movies of all time and not nearly as memorable as The King and I or The Bad Seed or as controversial as Baby Doll.
Reasons: Kerr was simply burned by the competition most of the time she was nominated. And even if the best actress didn’t win, there was always one who was better than her. She also suffered from typecasting as a proper English woman or nun. Luckily she received an honorary Oscar for Lifetime Achievement.
Trivia: Recipient of the Sarah Siddons Award for Tea and Sympathy (so yes, the award Eve received in All About Eve is a real thing). Romantically linked to Burt Lancaster.

20. Peter Lorre

Despite never winning an Oscar in his lifetime and being mostly typecast in villain and supporting roles, Peter Lorre is perhaps one of the most iconic and better known actors ever mostly for being one of the creepiest movie stars ever. His bug eyes, cherub face, and Austrian accent were a favorite target of comedians and cartoonists who've basically immortalized him as a screen legend.

Despite never winning an Oscar in his lifetime and being mostly typecast in villain and supporting roles, Peter Lorre is perhaps one of the most iconic and better known actors ever mostly for being one of the creepiest movie stars ever. His bug eyes, cherub face, and Austrian accent were a favorite target of comedians and cartoonists who’ve basically immortalized him as a screen legend.

Personal Life: (1904-1964) Born László Löwenstein in the present day Slovakia town Ružomberok during the waning days of the Austrian Hungarian Empire. Father was a Jewish chief bookkeeper at a textile mill and served as a lieutenant in the Austrian army reserve. Mother died when he was 4, possibly of food poisoning. Father remarried his mom’s best friend to help raise his 4 motherless sons but he didn’t get along with his stepmother. Moved to Vienna in 1913 and father served on the eastern front during the winter of 1914-15 and was put in charge of a prison camp. Started acting on stage at after a stint as a bank clerk performing in Vienna, Poland, and Zurich. Career took off when he caught the eye of Bertolt Brecht and moved to Berlin in the late 1920s. Yet, he was forced to flee in 1933 due to the rise of Nazism and his Jewish heritage. First went to Paris and then London but eventually settled in London with a contract from Columbia Pictures. Moved to Warner Brothers in 1941 when he became a US citizen and legally changed his name. Married 3 times and had a daughter Catherine to Anne Marie Brenning. She would make headlines in 1977, in which a noted serial killer confessed to stop her with an intent to kidnap and murder her but let her go when they realized who she was. Suffered from a chronic gall bladder infection for years which led to a morphine addiction, which he successfully overcame but didn’t fully recover. Later in his career he would gain 100lbs. Died of a stroke at 59.
Famous for: Hungarian-American actor who became an international sensation in the Fritz Lang film M where plays a serial killer who targets little girls. Yet, he’d soon find himself in enforced exile and have to learn English for Hitchcock’s first filming of The Man Who Knew Too Much. Once in Hollywood, he’d be a featured player in movies ranging from crime, mystery, film noir, and horror since he was one of the creepiest men ever. Yet, he’d also appear in a Disney movie and do an occasional comedy. Frequently typecast as a sinister foreigner, his post war career was erratic. Notable roles are Hans Beckert from M, Abbott from The Man Who Knew Too Much, Dr. Gogol from Mad Love, Raskolnikov from Crime and Punishment, The General from Secret Agent, Col. Glimpy from Crack-Up, Mr. Moto from the Mr. Moto series, Joel Cairo from The Maltese Falcon, Ugarte from Casablanca, Victor Emmeric from The Verdict, Dr. Karl Roth from The Lost One, and Conseil from 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.
Nominated for: Lorre was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not getting at least a nomination for Best Supporting Actor in 1941 for The Maltese Falcon.
Reasons: For one, the Hollywood establishment simply not interested in giving film prizes for foreign film performances. Not to mention, Lorre’s friendship with blacklisted playwright Bertolt Brecht didn’t help either and actually got him kicked out of Warner Brothers. This put his career on the decline and declare personal bankruptcy in 1949.
Trivia: Was a supporter of the Committee for the First Amendment during the Red Scare. Played a James Bond villain on television. Was referred to as “the World’s Greatest Actor,” by Charlie Chaplin and got along famously with Hitchcock. Vincent Price did the eulogy at his funeral. Tried to help many of his Jewish friends get out of Europe and was an ardent anti-Nazi. Refused to entertain in a hospital during WWII, opting to sit with the troops and listen to their stories instead. Reputed to have said at Bela Lugosi’s funeral, “Do you think we should drive a stake through his heart just in case?”

Movie Stars Who Have Never Won an Oscar: Part 1 – Peter O’Toole to Lauren Bacall

Richard Burton and Peter O'Toole in the 1964 Becket which pertains that the relationship Henry II shared with his friend Thomas Becket as having a gay subtext. Also it's costume design would be the equivalent of a Revolutionary War picture in which the Founding Fathers are dressed in 20th century business suits. Still, O'Toole and Burton: Drinking buddies with a combined total of 15 Oscar nominations but not a single win.

Richard Burton and Peter O’Toole in the 1964 Becket which pertains that the relationship King Henry II shared with his friend and eventual martyred Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Becket as having a gay subtext. Also it’s costume design would be the equivalent of a Revolutionary War picture in which the Founding Fathers are dressed in 20th century business suits. Still, O’Toole and Burton: Drinking buddies with a combined total of 15 Oscar nominations but not a single win.

Sure this 20 part series may be a vanity project that I’ve been working on since January. Yet, I did this series just to make a point as to how many actors in Hollywood and around the world don’t win competitive Oscars in their lifetime. We all know that winning one is every actor’s dream, especially with a role of a lifetime. Sure many of them are famous and talented stars we know and love while some are distinguished character actors we may or may not recognize unless we look them up. However, despite all the glitz and glamor associated with winning an Oscar, it may as come as a surprise that most actors don’t win Oscars during their career. Of course, this isn’t a surprise since most actors aren’t the big movie stars you hear in the magazines and newspapers anyway. In fact, most players in Hollywood usually are extras, bit players, or have supporting roles. Stars usually consist of the top 10% of Tinseltown anyway. Not to mention, a lot of your movie stars have unpredictable and sometimes brief careers, especially actresses hired for their looks in action movies. Let’s face it, you’re more likely to see Jennifer Lawrence doing movies well into her 80s than Kristen Stewart ever giving an Academy Award winning performance. And even if you are a movie star, your chances of making the Oscar speech are slim since most of them don’t even get nominated in the first place. And if they receive a nomination, they aren’t likely to be nominated again. Now my series on those who never won Oscars consist of 200 on the list with many legendary names in their own right and even they may consist of a small sample. And by Oscar, I mean a competitive Oscar usually from the 4 acting categories of Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actor, and Best Supporting Actress. However, this series doesn’t include movie stars who are:

1. Still alive and still working. This is the main reason why actors like Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt, Alan Rickman, Tom Cruise, Johnny Depp, and Glenn Close aren’t on the list since they still have chance (albeit a very small one, but still). This is a list of people who haven’t won an Oscar and won’t win one in the future since they aren’t making movies anymore. Most of these people featured are from the Golden Age of Hollywood for this very reason.
2. Who have won competitive Oscars in other categories like Warren Beatty for directing Reds, Richard Attenborough for directing Gandhi, Orson Welles for co-writing Citizen Kane, and Charlie Chaplin for his Limelight score in the 1970s.
3. Anyone mostly active during the Silent Era before 1927-1928 Oscars mostly because the Academy Awards weren’t around at the time and many of their careers ended once sound became a mainstay in the movies. This explains why actors like Rudolph Valentino aren’t on the list (though he was dead by then). John Barrymore, Conrad Veidt, Douglas Fairbanks Jr., and Lillian Gish get in since they’ve made sound films.
4. Famous people who achieved acclaim in a very different line of work like Harry Belafonte best known as a Calypso singer and Richard Pryor, Eddie Cantor, Jerry Lewis, and Bob Hope are better recognized as comedians. Dean Martin doesn’t get in because he’s better recognized as a singer.
5. Also more recognizable as TV stars like Lucille Ball, Robert Young, Peter Falk or Andy Griffith. Fred MacMurray, Richard Griffiths, William Demarest, and James Garner get in since their film roles are just as equally significant and will be known better for younger audiences as movie stars anyway.
6. Actors known mostly as child stars, explaining why Freddie Bartholomew, Shirley Temple, and Margaret O’Brien don’t get in. After all, child actors normally don’t win Oscars anyway. Yet, Mickey Rooney and Natalie Wood get in since they acted in films as adults.

Now this selection pertains to some of the better known names in movie history almost anyone is sure to recognize. First, you have the famous Peter O’Toole and Richard Burton who both received the most Oscar nominations without a single win. Next, you have the suave and gentlemanly Cary Grant best known for his screwball romantic comedies, debonair looks and fashion sense, and performances in Hitchcock movies. Then we have movie tough guys like Robert Mitchum, Steve McQueen, and Edward G. Robinson known for playing crooks, gangsters, and action heroes that pushed these men to iconic status. Next, there’s Judy Garland who sang the Academy Award winning song, “Over the Rainbow” as Dorothy from The Wizard of Oz but never nabbed a competitive statuette herself though her character Vicki Lester did in-universe in A Star Is Born. Then you have Brooklyn accented Barbara Stanwyck who basically did anything during her 60 year career after spending a childhood as an orphan from the streets of New York City. Finally, you have Ava Gardner and Lauren Bacall best known for being sensual beauties as well as being married to famous men like Mickey Rooney, Frank Sinatra, Humphrey Bogart, and Jason Robards Jr. So without further adieu, here are the first 10 actors in my first installment of stars who’ve never won an Oscar.

1. Peter O’Toole

Peter O'Toole was best known for playing the eccentric WWI officer T. E. Lawrence in David Lean's 1962 epic Lawrence of Arabia. Of course, he had the terrible tendency of getting nominated for Oscars in years where another actor gave a performance that would quickly overshadow his.

Peter O’Toole was best known for playing the eccentric WWI officer T. E. Lawrence in David Lean’s 1962 epic Lawrence of Arabia. Of course, he had the terrible tendency of getting nominated for Oscars in years where another actor gave a performance that would quickly overshadow his.

Personal Life: (1932-2013) may have been born in Conemara, Ireland or Leeds, England (though he resided in Conemara as an adult and had his ashes spread there). Worked as a journalist, photographer, and signaler for the Royal Navy. Mother was a Scottish nurse while father was a metal plater, soccer player, and racecourse bookmaker. Started acting at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and as a Shakespearean actor for the Bristol Old Vic before debuting in 1959. Married to Sian Philips from 1959-1979 with which he had 2 daughters. Also had a son with longtime girlfriend and model Kate Brown. Had a reputation for hard drinking and partying that it caused him all sorts of health problems it nearly killed him in the 1970s. Yet, he only quit drinking for good when he was 75. Retired in 2012. Died at 81.
Famous for: Anglo-Irish actor best known for holding the record of the most Academy Award nominations without a single win. Notable roles include T. E. Lawrence from Lawrence of Arabia, Henry II from Becket and The Lion in Winter, Lord Jim, Mr. Chips from Goodbye Mr. Chips, Lord Jack Gurney, 14th Earl of Gurney from The Ruling Class, Miguel Cervantes/Don Quixote from Man of la Mancha, Eli Cross from The Stunt Man, Alan Swann from My Favorite Year, Reginald Johnston from The Last Emperor, and Maurice from Venus.
Nominated for: Had 8 Oscar nominations without winning a single one all for Best Actor: 1962 for Lawrence of Arabia, 1964 for Becket, 1968 for The Lion in Winter, 1969 for Goodbye, Mr. Chips, 1972 for The Ruling Class, 1982 for My Favorite Year, and 2006 for Venus.
Most Crushing Loss: I would have to say either 1968 or 1969 would be the years he was robbed the most. Sure the other times were bad, too, but at least to guys who at least deserved to win like Gregory Peck, Rex Harrison, Marlon Brando, Ben Kingsley, and Forrest Whittaker. Of course, Cliff Roberson was great in the Flowers for Algernon adaptation Charly but I couldn’t say that it was better than O’Toole’s Henry II in The Lion in Winter (a movie robbed for Best Picture by Oliver!, bastards. Then again, the Academy awarded an Oscar for Tom Hanks for Forrest Gump, so that loss isn’t surprising). And while the 1960s version of Goodbye, Mr. Chips isn’t nearly as good as the 1939 original but surely O’Toole should’ve at least lost to a better actor than the eternally talentless and overrated John Wayne.
Reasons: Most likely being burned by the competition. Whenever O’Toole got nominated for an Oscar, he was usually against some other actor playing a role of a lifetime whether it be Gregory Peck, Marlon Brando, Ben Kingsley, or Forrest Whitaker. Of course, since he kept getting nominated, the Academy just reasoned that O’Toole would probably get his chance someday until they got smart and awarded him an Honorary Oscar in the 1990s so even if he didn’t win a competitive one, he’d at least get the statuette he deserved.
Trivia: Helped write the modern version of the Irish folk song “Carrickfergus” with Dominic Behan and wore green socks for good luck (which didn’t help him at the Oscars though, yet with all the health issues and bad habits he’s had it’s a wonder he lived to 81). Said he could quote all of Shakespeare’s 154 sonnets, which he read daily. Has had an award named after him at the Old Vic, where he got his start. Wrote 2 memoirs.

2. Richard Burton

Though Richard Burton was a Welsh coal miner's son who managed to become a classically trained Shakespearean actor with 7 Oscar nominations without a win, most people remember him for his dysfunctional 2 marriages to Elizabeth Taylor and his legendary alcoholism.

Though Richard Burton was a Welsh coal miner’s son who managed to become a classically trained Shakespearean actor with 7 Oscar nominations without a win, most people remember him for his dysfunctional 2 marriages to Elizabeth Taylor and his legendary alcoholism.

Personal Life: (1925-1984) born in Wales as Richard Jenkins and the 12th of 13 children in a Welsh-speaking coal miner’s household. Absentee father was a gambler and drunk who’d often go on sprees for weeks and wouldn’t acknowledge his famous son’s talents, achievements, and acclaim. Unsurprisingly, he was raised by his sister Ceilia after his mom died giving birth to his younger brother Graham at the age of 43 when he was less than 2 years old. Earned pocket money by running messages, hauling horse manure, and delivering newspapers. Earned a prize as a boy soprano as well as served in the RAF during the mid to late 1940s but couldn’t be a pilot due to his poor eyesight. Started smoking at 8 and drinking at 12. Took the name of Burton after his favorite teacher, Air Training Corps commander, and father figure who encouraged him to pursue an acting career. Married 5 times but his best known part about his love life are his 2 turbulent marriages to Elizabeth Taylor (who considered him among the 3 loves of her life along with Mike Todd and jewelry. Yet, her deepest wish was to see him win the Oscar he deserved.) Had 4 daughters consisting of the biological 2 he had with first wife actress/producer Sybil Williams, a stepdaughter he legally adopted (who was Taylor’s by Mike Todd), and a girl he and Taylor adopted from Germany. He’s also best known for his chronic alcoholism, chain smoking, causing a lot of controversy in the British press, moving to Switzerland as a tax exile, lifelong socialism, and experiencing all kinds of health problems before a cerebral hemorrhage took his life at 58 (which might’ve been genetic since his dad died from the same thing in 1957).
Famous for: Welsh actor known for his mellifluous baritone voice and great acting talent that he was called “the natural successor to Olivier” after establishing himself as a formidable Shakespearean actor in the 1950s that included a memorable performance of Hamlet. Was one of the top box office stars and highest paid actors in the mid to late 1960s receiving fees of $1 million or more as well as a share of the gross receipts. Yet, his legendary alcoholism was his undoing since he failed to live up to such high expectations that he disappointed his colleagues and critics which fueled his reputation as a thespian wastrel. Also known for having 7 Academy Award nominations without a single win making him a runner-up to Peter O’Toole’s record. Notable roles are Philip Ashley from My Cousin Rachel, Marcellus Gallio from The Robe, Alexander the Great, Mark Antony from Cleopatra, Archbishop Thomas Becket from Becket, Rev. Dr. T. Lawrence Shannon from The Night of the Iguana, Hamlet, George from Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Alec Leamas from The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, Petruchio from The Taming of the Shrew, Doctor Faustus, Major John Smith in Where Eagles Dare, King Henry VIII from Anne of the Thousand Days, Martin Dysart from Equus, and O’Brien from Nineteen Eighty-Four.
Nominated for: Had 7 Oscar nominations without winning a single one with the first one for Best Supporting Actor and Best Actor for the other 6: 1952 for My Cousin Rachel, 1953 for The Robe, 1964 for Becket, 1965 for The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, 1966 for Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, 1969 for Anne of the Thousand Days, and 1977 for Equus.
Most Crushing Loss: I’d have to say 1969 would’ve been his most upsetting loss Oscar wise. Sure the other years weren’t much better but at least he’s lost to guys like theater veterans Rex Harrison and Paul Scofield who were perfect for their parts as well as legends like Anthony Quinn, William Holden, Lee Marvin, and Richard Dreyfuss. He was a way better actor than the extremely overrated John Wayne and thus, should’ve either won or at least lost to Jon Voight, Dustin Hoffman, or Peter O’Toole.
Reasons: Like Peter O’Toole, he was also burned by the competition with a rival nominee having a role of a lifetime whenever he got nominated. And he got nominated so much that the Academy thought he might get his chance someday. Yet, he never did nor did he live long enough to receive an honorary Oscar either. Another factor might’ve been his alcoholism (but probably not his scandalous marriages to Elizabeth Taylor since she won an Academy Award during their time together).
Trivia: Had an excellent singing voice and won a Tony for Camelot in 1961. Said in an interview that he experimented with homosexuality as well as got into a sonnet quoting contest with Robert F. Kennedy. Kept a diary from the time he was 14, wrote memoir about Christmas during his childhood as well as occasional magazine articles. Buried in a red suit as a tribute to his Welsh roots and a copy of Dylan Thomas poems. Though he and Taylor discussed being buried together, his widow purchased the plot next to him and erected a large headstone across both before Taylor had the chance.

3. Cary Grant

Cary Grant's rise from an impoverished childhood in Bristol to one of Hollywood's most iconic leading men is no less impressive. Yet, his life was marred by inner demons, failed marriages, mood swings and tripping on LSD, which he thought was awesome.

Cary Grant’s rise from an impoverished childhood in Bristol to one of Hollywood’s most iconic leading men is no less impressive. Yet, his life was marred by inner demons, failed marriages, mood swings and tripping on LSD, which he thought was awesome. Still, his story bears a lot of similarities to The Great Gatsby.

Personal Life: (1904-1986) Born Archibald Alexander Leach in Bristol, England. Father was a pants presser in a factory but was often absentee as well as a philanderer and alcoholic. Mother was clinically depressed since the death of a previous child and didn’t show much love for him. At 9, dad placed his mom in a mental institution and lied to his son that was on a “long holiday” and later that she died (but Cary wouldn’t find out the truth until he was 31 but he reconnected with her). At 10, dad shacked up with his girlfriend and basically abandoned him. Expelled from school at 14 and joined a theater troupe he once worked with while he was 6. Immigrated to the United States in the early 1920s while in his mid teens. Spent the 1920s working the vaudeville and Broadway circuit as a stilt walker, acrobat, juggler, and mime before signing onto Hollywood as Cary Grant in 1931. Legally changed his name to Cary Grant once he became a US citizen in 1942. Married 5 times though there were rumors about him being bisexual (especially while he was living with Randolph Scott). Had a lot of demons in his life (which isn’t unusual for someone who had a very unhappy and lonely childhood as well as grew up poor). Retired from filmmaking after having a daughter Jennifer Grant with Dyan Cannon. Died of a stroke in Iowa.
Famous for: British and American actor known for his transatlantic accent, debonair demeanor, and dashing good looks who’s considered one of Hollywood’s biggest stars and was said to be the Greatest Male Star of All Time after Humphrey Bogart. Considered one of Hollywood’s definitive leading men as a leading box office attraction for nearly 30 years as well as acting in 72 films. Notable roles are Jerry Warrier from The Awful Truth, Dr. David Huxley from Bringing Up Baby, Johnny Case from Holiday, Sgt. Cutter from Gunga Din, Walter Burns from His Girl Friday, C. K. Dexter Haven from The Philadelphia Story, Mortimer Brewster from Arsenic and Old Lace, Johnnie Aysgarth from Suspicion, Roger Adams from Penny Serenade, T. R. Devlin from Notorious, Ernie Mott from None But the Lonely Heart, the angel Dudley from The Bishop’s Wife, Capt. Rochard from I Was a Male War Bride, John Robie from To Catch a Thief, Roger Thornhill from North By Northwest, Nickie Ferrante from An Affair to Remember, Phillip Adams from Indiscreet, and the Spy from Charade as well as others. His range spanned from screwball and romantic comedies to drama and thrillers.
Nominated for: Despite his appeal, popularity, and fame that he was able to go independent, he was only nominated twice and both times for Best Actor: 1941 for Penny Serenade and 1944 for None But the Lonely Heart.
Most Crushing Loss: Oscar wise, I’d have to say 1944 would be the most crushing for him since he lost to Bing Crosby who I didn’t really think deserved it (though I’m not familiar with his work). Even if Grant didn’t win, he should’ve at least lost to Charles Boyer (who was phenomenal in Gaslight and should’ve won that year anyway). At least Grant lost to Gary Cooper in 1941. Still, what I think is more of a crushing loss to Grant is that he made all these great movies during his long career, he was continually passed over for film industry and critics awards. Being snubbed for his 4 Hitchcock movies were probably the most crushing at all. At least he got an honorary Oscar in 1970 for his career which he certainly deserved. Also received Kennedy Center Honors in 1981.
Reasons: Well, you can argue that Grant was constantly passed over for awards mostly since he made a lot of comedies (screwball, romantic, and otherwise). His relationships with Randolph Scott as well as some of his troubled marriages and personal life might’ve been a factor as well.
Trivia: Was introduced to LSD therapy by his third wife Betsy Drake and was one of the first major celebrities to espouse the virtues of psychedelic drugs. Until California abolished it in 1966, he had booked 100 sessions for himself, tried to get as many Hollywood friends on it as he possibly could, and basically talked about it glowingly with Good Housekeeping and Time magazine (basically saying to millions of housewives that getting high was awesome). All this before the Beatles, Timothy Leary, and Frank Zappa. Had a onetime infatuation for Sophia Loren but she turned him down (since she’d been in love with Carlo Ponti since she was 15). Served on the boards of Fabrege, Hollywood Park, Western Airlines, the Academy of Magical Arts, and MGM. Owned many classic cars many of which were Cadillacs. Went on lecture tours across the US, making 36 public appearances between 1982-1986 and was on one of them when he died. May have thought he was Jewish and donated to Jewish causes but probably wasn’t. Yet, despite leaning Republican in his political views, condemned McCarthyism when his friend Charlie Chaplin was blacklisted (saying his artistic value outweighed political concerns, yet the fact they were friends isn’t too surprising since they’re both from similar backgrounds), befriended the Kennedys and the Mankiewicz family, and supported gun control after RFK’s assassination. Turned down a lot of roles that eventually went to Gregory Peck.

4. Robert Mitchum

Robert Mitchum was one of the most iconic film noir stars who played wide range of characters from supportive father figures, indifferent drifters, doomed anti-heroes, and outright villains. His performance as the Rev. Harry Powell is perhaps one of the most iconic as well as chilling.

Robert Mitchum was one of the most iconic film noir stars who played wide range of characters from supportive father figures, indifferent drifters, doomed anti-heroes, and incredibly sadistic villains. His performance as the Rev. Harry Powell is perhaps one of the most iconic as well as doomed to keep the lights on at night.

Personal Life: (1917-1997) born into a Methodist Bridgeport, Connecticut family as the second of 3 children to a shipyard and railroad worker and a Norwegian immigrant and sea captain’s daughter. Father was crushed to death in a railyard accident when he was less than 2 years old. Mother quickly married a former Royal Navy officer just out of economic necessity and had a daughter named Carol as well as worked as linotype operator for the Bridgeport Post. Brother and sister were also in showbiz while it was his sister who talked him into acting. His reputation as a prankster often involved in mischief and fights led to him being sent to his grandparents in Delaware at 12, expelled from middle school for scuffling with the principal, sent to live with his sister in New York’s Hell’s Kitchen at 13, and expelled from high school at 14. After dropping out, he became a train hopping hobo taking odd jobs like ditch digging for the Civilian Conservation Corps and professional boxing. Was arrested for vagrancy in Savannah, Georgia for vagrancy and was put on a chain gang before escaping to Delaware to nurse the injured leg he nearly lost and joining his sister in Long Beach, California. There, he worked as an operator for Lockheed Aircraft, a ghostwriter for an astrologer, and wrote song lyrics and monologues for his sister’s nightclub performances. Began acting in theater and started out in Hollywood as an extra before working his way up to B-Westerns and supporting roles before his big break in Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo. Yet, he had to take 8 months off from filmmaking due to being drafted in the army in 1946. Married to Dorothy Spence for 57 years and had 3 children named James, Christopher, and Petrine. Said to have numerous affairs. Sons had show biz careers as well. Was a heavy lifelong smoker as well as heavy drinker and died 5 weeks shy of his 80th birthday from lung cancer and emphysema complications.
Famous for: American actor who rose to prominence for his starring roles in several major film noir works and considered a forerunner to anti-heroes in film during the 1950s and 1960s. However, he also played a lot other character types to from indifferent to jaded drifters and supportive father figures to truly sadistic villains. Acted in over 110 films and TV series. Notable roles are Bobby Gray from Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo, Lt. Walker from The Story of G. I. Joe, Keeley from Crossfire, Jeff Bailey from Out of the Past, Max Calder in The River of No Return, the Rev. Harry Powell from The Night of the Hunter, Cpl. Allison USMC from Heaven Knows Mr. Allison, Lucas Doolin from Thunder Road, Paddy Camody from The Sundowners, Max Cady from Cape Fear, and Charles Shaughnessy from Ryan’s Daughter.
Nominated for: Despite his long career of appearing in over 110 films, he was only nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1945 for The Story of G. I. Joe.
Most Crushing Loss: Actually his Oscar loss in 1945 isn’t the worst for at least received some recognition for his role and it was early in his career. Not to mention, he lost to James Dunn who played the alcoholic dad in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn which isn’t bad either. However, what does more injustice to Mitchum is that he should’ve at least received an Oscar nomination for his roles in The Night of the Hunter and Cape Fear.
Reasons: Despite his popularity and natural acting talent, Mitchum was a loveable bad boy both on and off screen which might’ve been fine by today’s standards. Yet, back in the 1940s and 1950s, his reputation as a loveable scamp didn’t sit well with much of the Hollywood establishment. Though he was certainly a serious actor, he often pretended he wasn’t as well as said he only took some roles for the money. Also said to have spent 50 days in jail for marijuana possession. Nevertheless, he didn’t really many film awards until later in life and mostly for life achievement. Still, he’s one of the greats.
Trivia: Had a sideline career in music both as a singer and songwriter. Used his own singing voice whenever his characters sang in films. Wrote and recorded the theme song to Thunder Road which topped at No. 69 on the Billboard Singles Chart. Also recorded a Calpyso album as well as a country one. He even composed an oratorio produced by Orson Welles at the Hollywood Bowl. Provided the voice for American Beef commercials that touted, “Beef…it’s what’s for dinner from 1992 until his death. His son James played his brother in Thunder Road, a part which was said written for Elvis Presley. Helped Charles Laughton direct The Night of the Hunter since Mitchum had 3 kids and Laughton had none.

5. Barbara Stanwyck

Though starting as an orphaned impoverished girl on the streets of Brooklyn, Barbara Stanwyck was known for her versatility and professionalism that she was well loved by directors like Frank Capra, Fritz Lang, and Cecil B. DeMille. Her roles range from romantic comedy leads to the evil blonde lady from Double Indemnity.

Though starting as an orphaned impoverished girl on the streets of Brooklyn, Barbara Stanwyck was known for her versatility and professionalism that she was well loved by directors like Frank Capra, Fritz Lang, and Cecil B. DeMille. Her roles range from romantic comedy leads to the evil blonde lady from Double Indemnity.

Personal Life: (1907-1990) Born Ruby Catherine Stevens in Brooklyn, New York City. Parents were working class. At 4, her mother died from miscarriage complications after a drunk stranger accidentally knocked her off a moving streetcar. Two weeks after her mom’s funeral, alcoholic and womanizing father joined a work crew digging the Panama Canal and was never seen again basically leaving parental responsibilities to her 9 year old sister. When Mildred became a showgirl, she and her brother were placed in a series of foster homes which she often ran away from. At 14, she dropped out of school and wrapped packages at a Brooklyn department store as well as filled cards for a telephone company for $14 a week. Was fired from a job cutting dress patterns from Vogue magazine and would soon be a typist for the Jerome H. Remick Music Company. Despite her sister’s chagrin, she pursued her showbiz career joining the Ziegfeld Follies at 16. Debuted on Broadway in 1926 which was when she adopted “Barbara Stanwyck” as a stage name. Made her first film in 1927. Married twice with her second marriage to Robert Taylor. Adopted a son with her first husband Frank Fay. Was robbed and assaulted at her Beverly Hills home in 1981. Was a smoker from the age of 9 until 4 years before her death. Died of congestive heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at 82.
Famous for: American actress known for her 60 year career as a consummate and versatile professional with a strong, realistic screen presence and a favorite of directors Cecil B. DeMille, Frank Capra, and Fritz Lang. Made 85 films in 38 years before turning to television. Notable roles are Lora Hart from Night Nurse, Selina Peake De Jong from So Big!, Megan from The Bitter Tea of General Yen, Lily from Baby Face, Annie Oakley, Lady Lee from The Gambling Lady, Stella Dallas, Mollie Monahan from Union Pacific, Lorna Moon from Golden Boy, Lee Leander from Remember the Night, Jean from The Lady Eve, Ann Mitchell from Meet John Doe, Sugarpuss O’Shea from Ball of Fire, Hannah Sempler Hoyt from The Great Man’s Lady, Deborah Hoople, aka Dixie Daisy from Lady of Burlesque, Phyllis Dietrichson from Double Indemnity, Elizabeth Lane from Christmas in Connecticut, Martha Ivers from The Strange Love of Martha Ivers, Sally Morton Carroll from The Two Mrs. Carrolls, Sandra Marshall from Cry Wolf, Leona Stevenson from Sorry, Wrong Number, Jessie Bourne from East Side, West Side, Julia Sturges from Titanic, Sierra Nevada Jones from Cattle Queen of Montana, Helen Stilwin from Jeopardy, Gwen Moore from Escape to Burma, and Irene Trent from The Night Walker.
Nominated for: Stanwyck was nominated for Best Actress 4 times consisting of in 1937 for Stella Dallas, 1941 for Ball of Fire, 1944 for Double Indemnity, and in 1948 for Sorry, Wrong Number.
Most Crushing Loss: Losing the Best Actress prize to Luise Rainer in 1937 for she was playing a Chinese woman (which is kind of offensive to Asians, no offense). Stanwyck should’ve at least lost to Greta Garbo. Ingrid Bergman and Joan Fontaine were much more worthy competition.
Reasons: Stanwyck might’ve been popular among the public and very well liked in Hollywood, but she was burned out by the competition every time. Didn’t help that she was nominated what the Hollywood prestige would view as inferior films. At least she received an honorary Oscar for her career.
Trivia: Was romantically linked to Robert Wagner, Farley Granger, and Henry Fonda. Best known in her later career as Victoria Barkley from The Big Valley and Mary Carson from The Thorn Birds. Was an Ayn Rand fan who persuaded Warner Brothers to buy the rights for The Fountainhead and admired Atlas Shrugged. Often called, “The Best Actress Who Never Won an Oscar.” Stage name was inspired by a theatrical poster that read “Jane Stanwyck in ‘Barbara Frietchie.'”. Was the highest paid woman in 1944 according to the US government. Made 3 to 4 films a year at one point in her career. Marriage to Frank Fay may have been the inspiration for A Star Is Born (and yes, he did become an unemployed drunk).

6. Steve McQueen

Steve McQueen was called, "The King of Cool" and one of the biggest box office draws for his generation. His persona struck a cord with the counterculture of the Vietnam War era even though his movies tend to be quite violent.

Steve McQueen was called, “The King of Cool” and one of the biggest box office draws for his generation. His persona struck a cord with the counterculture of the Vietnam War era even though his movies tend to be quite violent.

Personal Life: (1930-1980) born in Beech Grove, Indiana. Father was a stunt pilot for a barnstorming flying circus who abandoned his mom 6 months after meeting her. Mom was said to be an alcoholic prostitute and was raised by his maternal grandparents and uncle (who was like a father to him) at his uncle’s Missouri farm and from 8-14 he’d live between that and his mother’s home whether it be in Indianapolis or Los Angeles. Ran away from home at 9 to escape an abusive stepfather and committed acts of petty crime with a street gang. After leaving his uncle’s farm a final time at 14, he ran away with the circus before joining his mom and second abusive stepfather in California, resuming his life as a petty crook. Was caught by police for stealing hubcaps who handed him over to his stepfather which ended him thrown down the stairs. McQueen threatened to kill him. Spent 2 years at a juvenile detention center at Chino where he finally shaped up. At 16, he joined his mom at Greenwich Village. Worked as a sailor, towel boy for a brothel, oil rigger, carnival trinket salesman, and lumberjack. Joined the Marines in 1947 and though he was demoted 7 times and put on a brig for 41 days, he embraced the discipline, saved 5 of his fellow Marines during an exercise, and assigned to guard Harry S. Truman’s yacht. All before his honorable discharge in 1950 and drifted into acting school thanks to the G. I. Bill. Was dyslexic and partially deaf since childhood. Married 3 times with Ali McGraw being his second wife. Had 2 children with his first wife Nelie Adams. Was known for his prolific drug use and was said to carry a handgun at all times after the Charles Manson murders of Sharon Tate and Jay Sebring. Died of malignant pleural mesothelioma at 50 while undergoing some kind of alternative treatment in Mexico.
Famous for: American actor called, “the King of Cool” for his antihero persona developed at the height of Vietnam War Era counterculture, making him a box office draw for the 1960s and 1970s. Became the highest paid movie star in the world in 1974. Known for being combative with directors and producers with directors and producers but his popularity placed him in high demand and able to command such high salaries. Notable roles are Steve Andrews from The Blob, Vin Tanner from The Magnificent Seven, Capt. Virgil Hilts “The Cooler King” from The Great Escape, The Cincinnati Kid, Nevada Smith, Jake Holman from The Sand Pebbles, Thomas Crown from the Thomas Crown Affair, Lt. Frank Bullitt from Bullitt, Doc McCoy from The Getaway, Henri ‘Papillon’ Charriere from Papillon, and Chief Mike O’Hallorhan from The Towering Inferno.
Nominated for: Only had one nomination for Best Actor in 1966 for The Sand Pebbles.
Most Crushing Loss: Well, he was never going to beat Paul Scofield in 1966. However, with a career like his, he should’ve received at least a Life Achievement Award, but he died too young.
Reasons: McQueen was more of an action star and acted in movies that usually didn’t get Oscar consideration. Also was known as combative with producers and directors.
Trivia: Had an unusual reputation for demanding free items in bulk from studios when agreeing to do a film such as electric razors, jeans, and other items. It was later found out that McQueen donated these items to the Boys Republic Reformatory School where he spent his teen years. He’d even make occasional visits there to play pool with the students and speak about his experiences. Was an avid motor and race car enthusiasts as well as enjoyed dirt bikes and flying. Had a daily 2 hour exercise regimen. Performed many stunts in his own films. Was good friends with James Garner. As of 2007, he’s among one of the top earning dead celebrities.

7. Edward G. Robinson

Though his looks and short stature prevented him from becoming a romantic leading man, Edward G. Robinson achieved Hollywood greatness playing 1930s gangsters from Warner Bros. Yet, despite his onscreen persona and imitable New York accent, he was a sensitive soft spoken man who spoke 7 languages, collected fine art, and hated guns. Yet, when he's Little Caesar, he's best known for, "Mother of mercy, is this the end of Rico?" not, "Pizza, Pizza."

Though his looks and short stature prevented him from becoming a romantic leading man, Edward G. Robinson achieved Hollywood greatness playing 1930s gangsters from Warner Bros. Yet, despite his onscreen persona and imitable New York accent, he was a sensitive soft spoken man who spoke 7 languages, collected fine art, and hated guns. Yet, when he’s Little Caesar, he’s best known for, “Mother of mercy, is this the end of Rico?” not, “Pizza, Pizza.”

Personal Life: (1893-1973) Born Emanuel Goldenberg in Bucharest, Romania to a Yiddish speaking Jewish family. Father was a builder. Family decided to immigrate to the US after his brother was attacked by an anti-semitic mob and arrived to America at 9 on Valentine’s Day, 1903. Grew up in New York City. Attended the American Academy for Dramatic Arts on a scholarship and made his Broadway debut in 1915. Married twice and had a son to Gladys Lloyd named Edward G. Robinson Jr. who was an actor and playboy as well as adopted her daughter. Died of bladder cancer at 79.
Famous for: Romanian-American actor who was a popular star during Hollywood’s Golden Age and best remembered for playing gangsters in the 1930s for Warner Brothers. Made 101 films in his 50 year career. Notable roles are Caesar Enrico “Rico” Bandello, Turou from Confessions of a Nazi Spy, Paul Ehrlich from Dr. Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet, Paul Julius Reuter from A Dispatch from Reuter’s, Johnny Rocco from Key Largo, Dathan from The Ten Commandments, Barton Keyes from Double Indemnity, Joe Keller from All My Sons, Martinius Jacobson from Our Vines Have Tender Grapes, and Sol Roth from Soylent Green as well as numerous roles as gangsters.
Nominated for: Robinson was never nominated for an Oscar, though he received an honorary Oscar 2 months after his death, which he certainly deserved.
Most Crushing Loss: Never being nominated for an Oscar, especially for Little Caesar in 1931.
Reasons: Well, depends on the times. If it’s before WWII, it was because he worked at Warner Brothers playing gangsters which wasn’t considered up to prestigious Hollywood award standards. If it’s after WWII, then it’s because of his refusal to testify in front of the House Committee on Un-American Activities. Though he tried to clear his name, he refused to name any Communist sympathizers yet his career would suffer until The Ten Commandments.
Trivia: Contrary to his onscreen persona, he was a sensitive, soft spoken, and cultured man who spoke 7 languages and hated guns. Was a passionate art collector and even ran a gallery with Vincent Price. But he had to sell his collection in 1956 to a Greek shipping tycoon Starvos Niarchos to pay for his divorce and for being underemployed. Also loved collecting record from the world’s leading concerts. Though too old to serve in the military during WWII, he was an outspoken critic of fascism and Nazism as well as donated more than $250,000 to 850 charitable groups between 1939 and 1949. Also signed a declaration to boycott all German made products in 1938.

8. Ava Gardner

Ava Gardner was one of the foremost dark haired sex symbols of the 1950s even though she was a talented actress. Yet, she's better known for being labeled as a femme fatale whom Frank Sinatra left the mother of his children for as well as their turbulent relationship and marriage. Of course, she did help revitalize his career for helping him get his Oscar-winning role in From Here to Eternity (sorry, Godfather fans).

Ava Gardner was one of the foremost dark haired sex symbols of the 1950s even though she was a talented actress. Yet, she’s better known for being labeled as a femme fatale whom Frank Sinatra left the mother of his children for as well as their turbulent relationship and marriage. Of course, she did help revitalize his career for helping him get his Oscar-winning role in From Here to Eternity (sorry, Godfather fans).

Personal Life: (1922-1990) Born in Smithfield, North Carolina. Was the youngest of 7 children. Parents were poor tobacco farmers while her father would work at a sawmill and her mother would tend to a series of boarding houses. While young, her family lost their property and spent a time in Newport News, Virginia and Wilson, North Carolina. At 15, her father died of bronchitis. Attended Atlantic Christian College for a year in secretarial studies. Was discovered when her brother-in-law took and displayed her portrait in the front window at his Fifth Avenue photography studio and someone suggested he and her sister should send her to the New York MGM office. Moved to Hollywood in 1941 and made her first film that year. After divorcing Sinatra, she moved to Spain in 1957 and London in 1968 after getting an elective hysterectomy to prevent uterine cancer that claimed her mother’s life. Married 3 times with husbands consisting of Mickey Rooney, Artie Shaw, and Frank Sinatra. Due to a lifetime of smoking, she suffered from emphysema, as well as an unidentified auto-immune disorder. In 1986, she had 2 strokes that left her partially paralyzed and bedridden as well as forced to retire. Suffered a bad fall a week before she died and lay on the floor unable to move until her housekeeper returned. Died of pneumonia at 67.
Famous for: American actress who appeared mainly in bit parts until she drew attention with her performance in The Killers. Appeared in several high profile films from the 1950s to 1970s and was one of Hollywood’s foremost dark haired sex symbols. Notable roles are Kitty Collins from The Killers, Jean Ogilvie from The Hucksters, Venus from One Touch of Venus, Pauline Ostrovsky from The Great Sinner, Isabel Lorrison from East Side, West Side, Pandora Reynolds from Pandora and the Flying Dutchman, Lady Susan Ashlow from The Little Hut, Barbara Beaurevel from My Forbidden Past, Julie LaVerne from Show Boat, Cynthia Green from The Snows of Kilimanjaro, Guinevere from The Knights of the Round Table, Maria Vargas from The Barefoot Contessa, Victoria Jones from Bhowni Junction, Lady Brett Ashley from The Sun Also Rises, Maria Cayetana, Duchess of Alba from The Naked Maja, Moira Davidson from On the Beach, Eloise Y. Kelly from Mogambo, Soledad from The Angel Wore Red, Baroness Natalie Ivanoff from 55 Days in Peking, Eleanor Holbrook from Seven Days in May, Maxine Faulk from The Night of the Iguana, Empress Elizabeth from Mayerling, Lily Langtry from The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean, and Nicole Dressler from The Cassandra Crossing.
Nominated for: Gardner was nominated for Best Actress in 1954 for Mogambo.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actress in 1954 for The Barefoot Contessa. Seriously, Academy, she was awesome in this!
Reasons: Well, when Frank Sinatra dumped the mother of his children for her, she was seen as a femme fatale that led him being blasted by gossip columnists, the Hollywood establishment, fans, and even the Roman Catholic Church. Yet, her helping getting Sinatra the part in From Here to Eternity basically saved his career. Yet, their marriage was extremely tempestuous with his intense jealousy and mistrust, her two abortions, her substantial drinking habit, and his suicide attempts. Was also prone to being constantly dismissed by the critics which resulted in her being so underrated. Not to mention, she was more or less seen as a sex symbol (which doesn’t make the Hollywood establishment take her talents seriously).
Trivia: Spoke in a thick Southern accent during her first screen test in New York that the folks at MGM found her voice incomprehensible. Was only able to overcome her drawl when MGM gave her a contract and a speech coach in Hollywood with Louis B. Mayer saying, “She can’t sing, she can’t act, she can’t talk, She’s terrific!” Used considerable influence to get Frank Sinatra cast in his Oscar-winning role From Here to Eternity which revitalized his career. Was infatuated by Howard Hughes. Born on Christmas Eve. Was friends with Ernest Hemingway. Had an island in Fiji named after her called Ava Ava. Housekeeper and corgi were taken in by Gregory Peck after she died. Was known for swearing a lot.

9. Judy Garland

Judy Garland is best remembered for her role as Dorothy from The Wizard of Oz as well as singing, "Over the Rainbow." Yet, despite her iconic status and success, her private life was hell with drug addiction, studio pressures, failed marriages, and financial difficulties later in life.

Judy Garland is best remembered for her role as Dorothy from The Wizard of Oz as well as singing, “Over the Rainbow.” Yet, despite her iconic status and success, her private life was hell with drug addiction, studio pressures, failed marriages, and financial difficulties later in life.

Personal Life: (1922-1969) Born Frances Ethel Gumm in Grand Rapids, Minnesota. Parents were vaudevillians who settled there to run a movie theater featuring their acts. At 2, she made her first stage appearance with her 2 older sisters as “Baby Frances.” In 1926, family relocated to Lancaster, California amid rumors that her father made sexual advances toward male ushers. Enrolled in a dance school with her sisters run by Ethel Meglin in 1928 and appeared on the Vaudeville circuit as the Gumm Sisters who later changed their names to the Garland sisters in 1934. Yet, the group eventually broke up when her older sister eloped to Reno with a musician. Was signed to MGM in 1935, which was the same year her father died of meningitis. Made her first film in 1936. Struggled immensely with her personal life since she was a child. Was addicted to prescription pills from a young age as well became eventually suicidal on one occasion. Self-image was strongly influenced by film executives saying she was unattractive and constantly manipulated her physical appearance. Was plagued by financial instability, often owing hundreds of thousands of dollars in back taxes. Married 5 times and had 3 children including Liza Minnelli to second husband Vincent Minnelli. Also had a long battle with drugs and alcohol ultimately leading to her death 47 to a barbiturate overdose.
Famous for: American actress and singer renowned for her vocals and attained international stardom which continued throughout her career spanning more than 40 years. Respected for her versatility as an actress in dramatic and musical roles as well as a recording artist. Made 9 films with Mickey Rooney. Notable roles are Dorothy from The Wizard of Oz, Patsy Barton from Babes in Arms, Penny Morris from Babes on Broadway, Little Nellie Kelly, Jo Hayden from For Me and My Gal, Ginger Gray from Girl Crazy, Esther Smith from Meet Me in St. Louis, Alice Maybery from The Clock, Susan Bradley from The Harvey Girls, Marilyn Miller from Till the Clouds Roll By, Hannah Brown from Easter Parade, Veronica Fisher from In the Good Old Summertime, Vicki Lester / Esther Blodgett from A Star Is Born, Jane Falbury from Summer Stock, Irene Hoffman from Judgment at Nuremberg, and Jean Hansen from A Child Is Waiting.
Nominated for: Garland was nominated twice once for Best Actress and once for Best Supporting Actress in 1954 for A Star Is Born and 1961 for Judgment at Nuremberg.
Most Crushing Loss: Losing to Grace Kelly in the 1954 Best Actress Race. What makes it more crushing is that she just gave birth to her son Joey and would’ve broadcasted her acceptance speech through her hospital bed via camera crew. Not to mention, everyone expected her to win that year. Luckily she received a Juvenile Oscar in the 1930s.
Reasons: Garland was burned by the competition. Seriously, her loss to Grace Kelly was an upset and she lost by 6 votes total. The competition in the acting categories in the 1950s was brutal. But still, Garland should’ve won for A Star Is Born. Also, Warner Bros. basically edited the film heavily which might not have been as good as the restored edition (which had to make do with stills and the recorded dialogue).
Trivia: Romantically linked with Artie Shaw and Orson Welles. Youngest recipient of the Cecille B. DeMille Award. James Mason performed the eulogy for her funeral.

10. Lauren Bacall

Though she had a long career from the 1940s, Lauren Bacall is best remembered for her 12 year marriage to Humphrey Bogart and the 4 films they made together. Of course, we all ignore the fact that they had 2 children and she was 19 when they met (while he was 45 and previously married 3 times).

Though she had a long career from the 1940s, Lauren Bacall is best remembered for her 12 year marriage to Humphrey Bogart and the 4 films they made together. Of course, we all ignore the fact that they had 2 children and she was 19 when they met (while he was 45 and previously married 3 times).

Personal Life: (1924-2014) Born Betty Joan Perske in the Bronx in New York City to Jewish parents. Father was a salesman and mother was a secretary. At 5, her parents divorced while her mother reverted back to the Romanian form of her last name Bacall (a name she’d later take since she never saw her father again and was very close to her mom who remarried a man named Goldberg). In 1941, she studied acting at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts while working at the St. James Theatre as an usher as well as a fashion model. Made her Broadway debut the next year at 17. Was recruited into films by Howard Hawks’ wife at the time, Nancy. Married twice husbands being Humphrey Bogart and Jason Robards Jr. and had 3 children. Died in her Dakota apartment from a massive stroke at 89.
Famous for: American actress known for her distinctive voice and sultry looks. Best known for appearing in film noir and romantic comedies and dramas. Made 4 movies with husband Humphrey Bogart. Notable roles are Marie “Slim” Browning from To Have and Have Not, Vivian Sternwood Rutledge from The Big Sleep, Irene Jansen from Dark Passage, Nora Temple from Key Largo, Amy North from Young Man with a Horn, Sonia Kovac from Bright Leaf, Schatze Page from How to Marry a Millionaire, Lucy Moore Hadley from Written on the Wind, Marilla Brown Hagen from Designing Woman, Sylvia Broderick from Sex and the Single Girl, Mrs. Harriet Belinda Hubbard from Murder on the Orient Express, Bond Rogers from The Shootist, Lady Westholme from Appointment with Death, Marcia Sindell from Misery, Hannah Morgan from The Mirror Has Two Faces, Witch of the Waste from Howl’s Moving Castle, and Annemarie Sterling from The Forger.
Nominated for: Bacall was nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1997 for The Mirror Has Two Faces.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actress in 1946 for The Big Sleep. Luckily she earned an honorary Oscar in 2009. Of course, the fact most people just know her for marrying Humphrey Bogart is even more crushing.
Reasons: Face it, no matter how talented and successful she was in her own right, she was always remembered as Humphrey Bogart’s wife, even after she married Jason Robards Jr. and had a kid to him. Also, more or less seen as a sex symbol with her distinctive voice and sultry looks, especially the definitive Hawksian woman of 1940s films. Also had a tendency to turn down scripts she didn’t find interesting and had a reputation for being difficult.
Trivia: Had a daughter named after Leslie Howard (at Bogart’s insistence no doubt). Son Stephen was named after the nickname she gave Bogart’s character in To Have and Have Not, where she met him. Was a staunch opponent of McCarthyism and was on the Committee for the First Amendment though she and Bogart distanced themselves from The Hollywood Ten. Was a classmate with Kirk Douglas at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. Crowned Miss Greenwich Village in 1942. Modeled for a cover in Harper’s Bazaar. According to Howard Hawks, she had a naturally high pitched nasal voice but was trained to make it lower. Was spokeswoman for High Point (coffee) and Fancy Feast cat food.