Movie Stars Who Have Never Won an Oscar: Part 8 – Merle Oberon to Edna Mae Oliver

While Merle Oberon was best known for playing Catherine Earnshaw from Wuthering Heights, like Heathcliff, she also had a mysterious past she covered up for years.

While Merle Oberon was best known for playing Catherine Earnshaw from Wuthering Heights, like Heathcliff, she also had a mysterious past she covered up for years, which has just only come to light after her death. So for those who believe she was from Tasmania, you are wrong. Besides, that’s Errol Flynn’s home range, not hers.

For some strange reason, we always like to know about our movie stars and celebrities, which many tend to idolize. Of course, this is a major reason why we have gossip columns, tabloids, TMZ, and a whole media industry dedicated to it. I usually stay away from the gossip because I’m really not interested in certain details of their personal lives and feel that they deserve some privacy. Also, some of the stuff you hear in the Hollywood gossip columns, well, they’re obtained through dubious means like paying people money for information, which I’ve learned in journalism class is totally unethical. In this selection, you’ll see some more Hollywood legends as well as a few from around the world, naturally. First, you have Merle Oberon best known as Catherine Earnshaw from Wuthering Heights as well as someone who lied about being born in Tasmania to conceal her mixed Indian heritage. Second, comes legendary swashbuckling Errol Flynn who was actually born in Tasmania but carried a scandalous lifestyle. Then there’s comic Danny Kaye whose films preserve his original genius in physical comedy, idiosyncratic pantomine, and rapid-fire nonsense songs. After that are French actors Maurice Chevalier and Charles Boyer who were inspirations for two very well known cartoon characters followed by legendary character actresses Agnes Moorehead and Edna May Oliver. Then there’s Madeline Kahn best known as a leading lady in Mel Brooks movies as well as Ralph Bellamy famous for playing doomed nice guys in Cary Grant films as well as Franklin Delano Roosevelt. And last but not, least is none other than one of the greatest silent screen actresses of all time Lillian Gish. So for your pleasure, here are 10 more movie stars who have never won an Oscar.

71. Merle Oberon

As well as playing Cathy, Merle Oberon was really a mixed race girl from India who managed to make it big on the British screen. Of course, her career was nearly doomed due to a car accident and perhaps cosmetic poisoning and an allergic reaction to sulfa drugs.

As well as playing Cathy, Merle Oberon was really a mixed race girl from India who managed to make it big on the British screen. Of course, her career was nearly doomed due to a car accident and perhaps cosmetic poisoning and an allergic reaction to sulfa drugs.

Personal Life: (1911-1979) Born Estelle Merle Thompson in Bombay, British India. Mother Anglo-Indian with partial Maori descent who might’ve had her at 12. Father might’ve been a mechanical engineer who worked in Indian Railways who later joined the British Army and died during the Battle of the Somme in WWI. Most likely raised by her grandmother. Would later try to conceal her Indian heritage by saying she was born in Tasmania and that all her school records were destroyed by fire. Would maintain such fiction for her professional life and admitted that it wasn’t true in the last year of her life. Records located since her death have confirmed her true origin. Moved to Calcutta in 1917 and quit school as a teenager. Said to work as a telephone operator, won a contest for a restaurant, and first performed with the Calcutta Amateur Dramatic Society. Was discovered by a man who said he’d introduce to her to Rex Ingram but bailed out one her once he saw she was mixed race. Yet, though he avoided her, she went to France and met Ingram at Nice. Made her first film in 1928. Came to England at 17 where she worked as a club hostess under the name Queenie O’Brien. Married 4 times with her first marriage to director Sir Alexander Korda. Adopted 2 children with third husband Bruno Pagiliai. Was involved in a serious car accident in 1937 which scarred her for life. Was said to suffer further damage to her complexion in 1940 from cosmetic poison and an allergic reaction to sulfa drugs. Retired in 1973. Died of a stroke in Malibu, California at 68.
Famous for: Anglo-Indian actress. Notable roles are Anne Boleyn from The Private Life of Henry VIII, Antonita, a Dancer of Passionate Temperament from The Private Life of Don Juan, Lady Blakeney from The Scarlet Pimpernel, Kitty Vane from Dark Angel, Karen Wright from These Three, Messalina from I, Claudius, Leslie Steele / Lady Claire Mere from The Divorce of Lady X, Cathy Earnshaw from Wuthering Heights, Joan Ames from ‘Til We Meet Again, Jill from That Uncertain Feeling, Lydia MacMillan from Lydia, Marjorie Ismay from Forever and a Day, Kitty Langley from The Lodger, George Sand from A Song to Remember, Cathy Mallory from Night Song, Linda Venning from Affair in Monte Carlo, Empress Josephine from Desiree, Dorothy Donnelly from Deep in My Heart, and Serena Moore from Interval.
Nominated for: Oberon was nominated for Best Actress in 1935 for The Dark Angel.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actress in 1939 for Wuthering Heights. Of course, the competition was brutal that year anyway.
Reasons: Well, Oberon’s face was scarred early in her career due to a 1937 car accident and might’ve suffered some more damage to cosmetic poisoning in 1940. And though makeup and camera technicians manage to hide her facial flaws, her career was in decline by 1945. Also, she didn’t get along with Sir Laurence Olivier during the filming of Wuthering Heights as well as The Divorce of Lady X and we know that Olivier’s career was gangbusters in the 1940s and 1950s, which may have cost her roles in Shakespearean film productions.
Trivia: Was of Sri Lankan and Maori extraction. Nicknamed, “Queenie.” Received stage name from her first husband. Romantically linked to David Niven. Fourth husband Richard Wolders was best known as Audrey Hepburn and Leslie Caron’s boyfriend.

72. Danny Kaye

Danny Kaye's

Danny Kaye’s “Anatole of Paris” number from The Secret Life of Walter Mitty targets an industry I think really needs trashed: the runway fashion scene. And it helps that those hats displayed are absolutely hideous.

Personal Life: (1911-1987) Born David Daniel Kaminsky in Brooklyn, New York to Ukranian Jewish immigrants. Mother died while he was in his teens. Was a high school dropout and ran away to Florida with a friend where they formed band. Worked as a soda jerk, insurance investigator, and office clerk. Was a tummler in the Borscht Belt and at the White Roe Resort for 4 seasons. Used the name Danny Kaye for the first time when he toured with a vaudeville group. Also worked for a burlesque revue. Made his film debut in 1935. Married to Sylvia Fine for 47 years and had a daughter named Dena. However, he and Sylvia became estranged in 1947 and he was involved with a succession of women (despite gay and bisexual rumors as well as an alleged affair with Sir Laurence Olivier that probably never happened). Died of heart failure brought on by complications of Hepatitis C which he received from a tainted blood transfusion during bypass surgery at 76.
Famous for: American actor, singer, dancer, and comedian. Performances featured physical comedy, idiosyncratic pantomimes, and rapid-fire nonsense songs. Made 17 films. Made a lot of movies with Virginia Mayo. Notable roles are Danny Weems from Up in Arms, Burleigh Hubert Sullivan from The Kid from Brooklyn, Walter Mitty from The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, Professor Hobart Frisbee from A Song Is Born, Georgie from The Inspector General, Hans Christen Andersen, Phil Davis from White Christmas, Hubert Hawkins from The Court Jester, Samuel L. Jacobowsky from Me and the Colonel, Red Nichols from The Five Pennies, and the Ragpicker from The Madwoman of Chaillot.
Nominated for: Kay was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not receiving an honorary Oscar at least.
Reasons: He was mainly a comedian and mostly made comedy films. Such would make him automatically ineligible for Oscars. Also spoke out against McCarthyism and the Hollywood Blacklist during the Red Scare.
Trivia: Attended a public school that was later named in honor of him. Witnessed a typhoon in Osaka, Japan in 1934, which nearly killed him. Yet, when the storm subsided, he had to calm his audience on stage with a flashlight to sing every song as loud as he can as well as inspired him to do pantomime, gestures, songs, and facial expressions. First ambassador-at-large for UNICEF. Hosted and sang for the 25th anniversary Disneyland celebration and help open for Epcot in 1982. Grew up a few blocks away from his wife and worked for her father, but didn’t meet until he was already in show business in 1939. Hosted the Academy Awards in 1952. Recorded, “I’ve Got a Lovely Bunch of Coconuts.” Couldn’t read a note of music so learned scores by ear. Entertained at home as a chef, specializing in Italian and Chinese food. Also taught Chinese cooking classes in San Francisco and built a kitchen in his house. Was an aviation enthusiast and operated several aircraft. Was part-owner of the Seattle Mariners but was a Dodgers fan. The only one in his original Brooklyn family born in America.

73. Errol Flynn

Though best known for his swashbuckling movies like The Adventures of Robin Hood, Errol Flynn had a personal life of ill repute of womanizing and substance abuse. Yet, despite that he was a accused of statutory rape, personal scandal didn't seem to hurt his career, much.

Though best known for his swashbuckling movies like The Adventures of Robin Hood, Errol Flynn had a personal life of ill repute of womanizing and substance abuse. Yet, despite that he was a accused of statutory rape, personal scandal didn’t seem to hurt his career, much.

Personal Life: (1909-1959) Born in Tasmania, Australia. Father was a biologist, lecturer, and later professor at the University of Tasmania (later at the Queen’s University at Belfast). Educated in England for 2 years and would later be expelled from another school in Australia. Was a junior clerk at a shipping company but was fired for stealing petty cash. At 18, went to Papua New Guinea where he tried but failed to find his fortune in metals mining and tobacco planting. Made his first film in 1933 and joined the Northampton Repertory Company in England where he received 7 months training as a professional actor. The next year he was dismissed over a violent fracas with a female stage manager which led her tumbling down a stairwell and joined Warner Bros. Made his first Hollywood film in 1935. Became a US citizen in 1942. Married 3 times and had 4 children (1 son to first wife Lili Damita, 2 daughters to second wife Nora Eddington, and 1 daughter to third wife Patrice Wymore). Had a reputation for womanizing, hard drinking, and narcotic abuse. Was rejected for service in WWII due to a health problems such as enlarged heart with a murmur, lingering chronic tuberculosis, and numerous STDs. Lost his savings in the 1950s after a series of financial disasters. Was prematurely aged and overweight by that time as well. Suffered from spinal osteoarthritis near the end of his life. Had hepatitis as early as 1952 which damaged his liver. Most likely died of a pulmonary embolism at 50.
Famous for: Australian American actor known for his romantic swashbuckler roles in films and his playboy lifestyle. Also was renown for his fast movie sword play you wouldn’t see in a fencing match. Appeared in 8 movies with Olivia DeHavilland. His successful career in Hollywood ended after WWII and did a series of flops in the 1950s in which he spent sailing aimlessly in the Western Mediterranean. Notable roles are Peter Blood from Captain Blood, Geoffrey Vickers from The Charge of the Light Brigade, Miles Hendon from The Prince and the Pauper, Robin Hood from The Adventures of Robin Hood, Captain Courtney from The Dawn Patrol, Wade Hatton from Dodge City, Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex from The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex, Kerry Bradford from Virginia City, Capt. Geoffrey Thorpe from The Sea Hawk, J. E. B. Stuart from The Santa Fe Trail, George Armstrong Custer from They Died With Their Boots On, Francis Warren from Footsteps in the Dark, James J. Corbett from Gentleman Jim, Jean Picard from Uncertain Glory, Captain Nelson from Objective, Burma!, Mark Caldwell from Cry Wolf, Don Juan de Marana from Adventures of Don Juan, Soames Forsyte from That Forsyte Woman, William Tell from The Story of William Tell, and Mike Campbell from The Sun Also Rises.
Nominated for: Flynn was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actor in 1939 for The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex. And yes, the Earl of Essex was really the hot idiot Flynn portrayed him to be.
Reasons: Well, other than acting in westerns and swashbucklers, Flynn had a lifestyle of womanizing as well as drug and alcohol abuse. In 1942, his lifestyle caught up with him when 2 underage girls accused him of statutory rape. Although he survived, he gained a notorious reputation as a ladies’ man which permanently damaged his screen image as an idealized romantic lead player. Not to mention, he wasn’t great to work with. Also, was already a has been after WWII.
Trivia: Father of photojournalist and war correspondent Sean Flynn who went missing in Cambodia in 1970 (probably murdered in the Khmer Rouge). Longtime friend of painter Boris Smirnoff who painted his portrait several times. Friends with Edward G. Robinson, Barbara Stanwyck, Norma Shearer, and Jean Harlow. Once thought Bette Davis had a crush on him while on the set of Elizabeth and Essex but her quarrelsome nature that led her to slap him across the face was really about her sharing equal billing with a guy she didn’t consider a real actor. And it wasn’t until years later when she said, “Damn it! The man could act!” Was a sailing and sea enthusiast. Was a war correspondent for the US during the Spanish Civil War. Wrote 3 books including an adventure novel.

74. Lillian Gish

Alongside Mary Pickford, Lillian Gish is perhaps one of the most famous actresses of the Silent Era when movies didn't have sound. She was particularly noted for her appearances in D. W. Griffith movies. However, just because she was in Birth of a Nation, doesn't mean I'd recommend the film as a good date movie for it certainly isn't, especially if you or your partner are black.

Alongside Mary Pickford, Lillian Gish is perhaps one of the most famous actresses of the Silent Era when movies didn’t have sound. She was particularly noted for her appearances in D. W. Griffith movies. However, just because she was in Birth of a Nation, doesn’t mean I’d recommend the film as a good date movie for it certainly isn’t, especially if you or your partner are black.

Personal Life: (1893-1993) Born in Springfield, Ohio. Father deserted the family before she was old enough to remember him but was later found institutionalized at an Oklahoma Hospital, where he died in 1912. Mother was an actress who later opened a candy store where she and her sister would sell popcorn and candy to theater patrons. Spent her childhood in Ohio, Illinois, and Oklahoma. Raised by her mother and relatives from both sides. Moved to New York when the theater next to her mother’s candy store burned down where they joined a theater and took modeling jobs. Was discovered by neighbor and aspiring actress Gladys Smith (a. k. a. Mary Pickford) who introduced her to D. W. Griffith. Made her first film in 1912. Never married or had children. Retired in 1987. Died of heart failure at 99.
Famous for: American actress, director, and writer whose career spanned 75 years. Was called “The First Lady of American Cinema.” Was a star of the Silent Era who successfully transitioned to sound and character roles. Notable roles are Elsie Stoneman from Birth of a Nation, The Woman Who Rocks the Cradle / Eternal Mother from Intolerance: Love’s Struggle Throughout the Ages, Lucy – The Girl from Broken Blossoms or The Yellow Man and the Girl, Anna Moore from Way Down East, Henriette Girard from Orphans of the Storm, Romola, Hester Prynne from The Scarlet Letter, Annie Laurie, Mimi from La Boheme, Laura Belle McCanles from Duel in the Sun, Mother Mary of Mercy from Portrait of Jennie, Rachel Cooper from The Night of the Hunter, Mattilda Zachary from The Unforgiven, Mrs. Smith from The Comedians, Hetty Seibert from Follow Me, Boys!, and Sarah Webber from The Whales of August.
Nominated for: Gish was nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1947 for Duel in the Sun.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1955 for The Night of the Hunter. Seriously, she was totally badass when she scared Robert Mitchum with a shotgun. Luckily she received an honorary Oscar in the 1970s.
Reasons: I’m sure members of the Academy wouldn’t see her in a great light if they knew she starred in Birth of a Nation (a film which makes Gone With the Wind look like Glory. I mean it basically glorifies lynching and the KKK). Was an outspoken non-interventionist and member of the America First Committee during the early years of WWII which resulted her being briefly blacklisted. Also, her sound career was sporadic. Also, in her early years, she was typecast as an ingénue.
Trivia: Was friends with Helen Hayes as well as her son’s godmother. Was also close to Mary Pickford discovered her and introduced to her career while they were neighbors. Romantically linked to D. W. Griffith. Survived the 1918 flu pandemic. Has a prize named in her and her sister’s honor. Older sister to Dorothy (whose career in sound wasn’t so prolific). Only silent era actress to receive the American Film Institute Lifetime Achievement Award. Directed Remodeling Her Husband in 1920.

75. Agnes Moorehead

Though most people remember her as Endora from Bewitched, Agnes Moorhead enjoyed a steady career as an actress in film, TV, stage, and radio. She also did the voice of the goose from the Charlotte's Web cartoon a lot of us grew up with.

Though most people remember her as Endora from Bewitched, Agnes Moorhead enjoyed a steady career as an actress in film, TV, stage, and radio. She also did the voice of the goose from the Charlotte’s Web cartoon a lot of us grew up with. Oh, and was also the mom on Citizen Kane.

Personal Life: (1900-1974) Born in Clinton, Massachusetts. Father was a Presbyterian minister. Mother was a singer. Said her first performance was reciting “The Lord’s Prayer” at her father’s church when she was 3 years old. Grew up in St. Louis, Missouri and later joined the chorus of the St. Louis Municipal Opera Company. Graduated from Muskingum College with a bachelor’s degree in biology. Taught school for 5 years in Soldiers Grove Wisconsin and earned a master’s degree from the University of Wisconsin. Graduated with honors from the American Academy of Dramatic Arts with honors. Her early acting career was marked with constant unemployment and days she went hungry but eventually found work in radio. Yet, her career finally took off when she met Orson Welles in 1937. Made her first film in 1941. Married twice and might’ve adopted a son. Died in Rochester, Minnesota of uterine cancer at 74 (possibly caused by filming The Conqueror at the nuclear test site in Yucca Flat, Nevada).
Famous for: American actress whose career spanned 3 decades in stage, radio, film, and television. Could play many different types but often portrayed haughty and arrogant characters. Notable roles are Mary Kane from Citizen Kane, Fanny from The Magnificent Ambersons, Violette Shumberg from The Big Street, Mrs. Mathews from Journey into Fear, Mrs. Reed from Jane Eyre, Mrs. Emily Hawkins from Since You Went Away, Baroness Aspasia Conti from Mrs. Parkington, Bruna Jacobson from Our Vines Have Tender Grapes, Madge Rapf from Dark Passage, Aggie MacDonald from Johnny Belinda, Nancy Ashford from Magnificent Obsession, Sara Warren from All That Heaven Allows, Hunlun from The Conqueror, Ellen Shawnessy from Raintree County, Queen Elizabeth I from The Story of Mankind, Vassilissa Mironova from The Tempest, Mrs. Snow from Pollyanna, Velma from Hush…Hush, Sweet Charlotte, Sister Cluny from The Singing Nun, and The Goose from Charlotte’s Web.
Nominated for: Moorehead was nominated 4 times for Best Supporting Actress in 1942 for The Magnificent Ambersons, 1944 for Mrs. Parkington, 1948 for Johnny Belinda, and 1964 for Hush…Hush Sweet Charlotte.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1941 for Citizen Kane.
Reasons: Well, she was closely associated with Orson Welles and was burned by the competition whenever she was nominated. Also, despite being married twice, a conservative Republican, and a devoutly religious woman, she was widely believed to be a lesbian in the entertainment community and might’ve even acknowledged it. Bewitched co-star and closet case, Paul Lynde would say of her, “Well, the whole world knows Agnes was a lesbian–I mean classy as hell, but one of the all-time Hollywood dykes.” A journalist reported an incident of one of her husbands cheating on her, “Agnes screamed at him that if he could have a mistress, so could she.” However, though we know she worked with a few gay people and had gay friends, rumors of her lesbianism have never been confirmed.
Trivia: Played Endora on Bewitched. Said to show up on the set with “a Bible in one hand and a script in the other” according to Dick Sargent. Served on her alma mater’s board of trustees for a year and received an honorary doctorate in literature. Was an inaugural member of the Mercury Theatre Company. Left a lot of her family’s estate and farmlands to Bob Jones University as well as biblical studies books from her personal library (which is ironic considering that many of her own peers thought she was a lesbian). BJU would later trade her stuff with an Ohio college for $25,000. Also left her professional papers, scripts, Christmas cards, and scrapbooks to the Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research at the Wisconsin Historical Society.

76. Madeline Kahn

Elizabeth: [after sex with The Monster]

Elizabeth: [after sex with The Monster] “Oh. Where you going?… Oh, you men are all alike. Seven or eight quick ones and then you’re out with the boys to boast and brag. YOU BETTER KEEP YOUR MOUTH SHUT. Oh… I think I love him.” You can easily see why Madeline Kahn was a favorite leading lady for Mel Brooks during the 1970s after reading this.

Personal Life: (1942-1999) Born Madeline Gail Wolfson in Boston to a non-observant Jewish family. Father was a garment manufacturer. At 2, her parents divorced and moved to New York City with her mother. Kahn was the name of her stepfather who later adopted her as Paula Kahn. Attended Hofstra University on a drama scholarship but graduated in speech therapy in 1964. Briefly taught school and made her debut as a chorus girl and appeared on Broadway in 1968. Made her first film the same year. Married to John Hansbury. Died of ovarian cancer at 57.
Famous for: American actress, comedian, and singer. Best known for her performances in Mel Brooks and Peter Bogdanovitch films. Notable roles are Eunice Burns from What’s Up Doc?, Trixie Delight from Paper Moon, Lili Von Shtupp from Blazing Saddles, Elizabeth from Young Frankenstein, Jenny Hill from The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes’ Smarter Brother,
Victoria Brisbane from High Anxiety, Mrs. Montenegro from The Cheap Detective, Caroline Howley from City Heat, El Sleezo Patron from The Muppet Movie, Empress Nympho from History of the World: Part I, Betty from Yellowbeard, Mrs. White from Clue, Gussie Mausheimer from An American Tail, Mrs. Munchnik from Mixed Nuts, Martha Mitchell from Nixon, and Gypsy Moth from A Bug’s Life.
Nominated for: Kahn was nominated twice for Best Supporting Actress in 1973 for Paper Moon and 1974 for Blazing Saddles.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1974 for Young Frankenstein, which is a better Mel Brooks film than Blazing Saddles. Seriously, her performance as Elizabeth was much better than Lili Von Shtupp.
Reasons: She’s best known for her comedic roles as a sexy leading lady in Mel Brooks movies. Also was more of a theater actress.
Trivia: Won a Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play in 1993. Was an operatically trained singer. Husband and brother erected a bench for her in New York’s Central Park. Was a host of Saturday Night Live.

77. Maurice Chevalier

Despite being French and having a suave persona of a sophisticated gentlemen, Maurice Chevalier was actually from the working class and considered a daily 10 cent parking fee as an extravagant expense. He put on a heavy French accent which didn't show up in his normal conversation. Nevertheless, he's an inspiration for Lumiere from Beauty an the Beast.

Despite being French and having a suave persona of a sophisticated gentlemen, Maurice Chevalier was actually from the working class and considered a daily 10 cent parking fee as an extravagant expense. He put on a heavy French accent which didn’t show up in his normal conversation. Nevertheless, he’s an inspiration for Lumiere from Beauty an the Beast.

Personal Life: (1888-1972) Born in Paris, France. Father was a house painter. Worked as a carpenter’s apprentice, electrician, printer, and doll painter. Started in show business in 1901 singing at a café for which he wasn’t paid. Was wounded by shrapnel and became a prisoner of war during WWI for 2 years. Debuted on Broadway in 1922 and went to Hollywood in 1928. Married twice and had many mistresses. Died at 83.
Famous for: French actor, Cabaret singer, and dancer. Career spanned for over 60 years. Best known for signature songs including “Louise”, “Mimi”, “Valentine”, and “Thank Heaven for Little Girls” and for his films. Bowler hat was his trademark attire. Was partner to the biggest female name in France for 2 years. Made 60 films and was paired with Jeannette McDonald. Notable roles are Maurice Marney from Innocents of Paris, Count Alfred Renard from The Love Parade, Pierre Mirande from The Big Pond, Albert Loriflan from Playboy in Paris, Maurice from Love Me Tonight, Danilo from The Merry Widow, Gaston de Nerac ‘Paragot’ from The Beloved Vagabond, Emile Clément from Man About Town, the King from A Royal Affair, Honoré Lachaille from Gigi, Claude Chavasse from Love in the Afternoon, Paul Barriere Can-Can, and Panisse from Fanny.
Nominated for: Chevalier was nominated twice for Best Actor in 1929 for The Love Parade and 1930 for The Big Pond.
Most Crushing Loss: Not winning Best Actor in 1929 for The Love Parade. I could understand him losing to Wallace Beery for The Big House, but George Arliss? Nevertheless, at least he received an honorary Oscar in the 1950s the same year Gigi came out.
Reasons: Not sure about the 1930s but in the 1940s, he was blackballed by Hollywood and the French filmmaking industry for performing for Allied POWs at a German prison camp. Of course, the Nazis wanted him to do more but he refused all their offers save for the camp where he himself was held prisoner in WWI. Yet, he was still arrested by the French government for collaboratism for which he was acquitted. Yet, it would be several years before he was granted a visa to leave the country. Was also seen as “potentially dangerous” to the US government for signing an anti-nukes petition called the Stockholm Appeal.
Trivia: Thought a 10 cent parking fee was a bit too much. Spoke with a heavy French accent in his films even though his real English was quite fluent and sounded more American. Was friends with Adolphe Menjou and Charles Boyer. Has inspired countless imitations such as Lumiere from Beauty and the Beast being the most famous. Subject of the first official celebrity roast at the New York Friars’ Club in 1949.

78. Ralph Bellamy

Although Ralph Bellamy was best known for being a doomed nice guy in Cary Grant movies and playing FDR, he had a longstanding career that spanned 62 years in leading and supporting roles which earned him great acclaim and awards except at the Oscars, of course. Also, his last movie was Pretty Woman, good God.

Although Ralph Bellamy was best known for being a doomed nice guy in Cary Grant movies and playing FDR, he had a longstanding career that spanned 62 years in leading and supporting roles which earned him great acclaim and awards except at the Oscars, of course. Also, his last movie was Pretty Woman, good God.

Personal Life: (1904-1991) Born in Chicago, Illinois. Mother was a Canadian immigrant. Ran away from home at 15 and joined a road show before landing in New York where he started acting on stage. Movie debut in 1931. Married 4 times. Was married to Alice Murphy for 42 years. Died of a lung ailment at 87.
Famous for: American actor whose career spanned 62 years. Played leading and supporting roles garnering acclaim and awards. Co-starred in 5 films with Fay Wray. Notable roles are Johnny Franks from The Secret Six, Dr. Ladd from Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, Daniel Leeson from The Awful Truth, Bruce Baldwin from His Girl Friday, Dr. Davis from Footsteps in the Dark, Colonel Paul Montford from The Wolf Man, Franklin Delano Roosevelt from Sunrise at Campobello, Randolph Duke from Coming to America, and James Morse from Pretty Woman.
Nominated for: He was nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1937 for The Awful Truth.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actor in 1960 for Sunrise at Campobello. Seriously, he’s practically said to be Franklin Delano Roosevelt during the 1920s. Luckily he was so respected by his peers that he was awarded an Honorary Oscar.
Reasons: More than anything, he’s kind of an underrated actor who was much more respected in theater than in Hollywood. Also helped shelter those blacklisted in Hollywood in the Actors’ Equity Broadway Theater during the darkest days of McCarthyism.
Trivia: Owned his own theater company in 1927. Opened the popular Palm Springs Raquet Ball Club in 1934 with Charles Farrell. Founding member of the Screen Actors Guild in 1933. President of Actors’ Equity from 1952-1964. Won a Tony for Sunrise at Campobello.

79. Charles Boyer

Charles Boyer's career lasted longer than most romantic cinematic actors, mostly because he took supporting roles in his later years. Yet, he's also very well known for playing a husband from hell from Gaslight and his performance is the reason why we call the form of psychological abuse depicted,

Charles Boyer’s career lasted longer than most romantic cinematic actors, mostly because he took supporting roles in his later years. Yet, he’s also very well known for playing a husband from hell from Gaslight and his performance is the reason why we call the form of psychological abuse depicted, “gaslighting.” Yet, he had to lose the Oscar to Bing Crosby. Shit.

Personal Life: (1899-1978) Born in a small town in Southern France as a merchant’s son. Discovered the movies at 11. During WWI, he performed comedy sketches for soldiers and worked as a hospital orderly. Studied in the Sorbonne and Paris Conservatory. Big acting break came when he replaced a leading man in a stage production which became an immediate hit. Performed on stage and silent screen during the 1920s before signing an MGM contract and moving to the US though his film career didn’t really take off until talkies. Married to British actress Pat Paterson for 44 years and had a son who committed suicide at 21 through Russian roulette. Became a US citizen in 1942. Died of an overdose on Seconal while at a friend’s house in Scottsdale 2 days after his wife’s death shortly before his 79th birthday, which was probably a suicide.
Famous for: Franco-American actor who appeared in more than 80 films between 1920 and 1976. Though best known for playing romantic leads particularly suave and sophisticated ladies’ men, he also played character roles as he got older and sometimes the occasional villain. Yet, he was said to be the last of cinema’s great lovers since his career lasted longer than most romantic actors. Notable roles are Pepe le Moko from Algiers, Boris Androvski from The Garden of Allah, Napoleon Bonaparte from Conquest, Michel Marnet from Love Affair, Cesar from Fanny, Gregor Anton from Gaslight, and other character roles.
Nominated for: He was nominated 4 times for Best Actor: 1937 for Conquest, 1938 for Algiers, 1944 for Gaslight, and 1961 for Fanny.
Most Crushing Loss: His 1944 Oscar loss to Bing Crosby is perhaps one of the most undeserving losses for an actor in movie awards history. His phenomenal performance as Ingrid Bergman’s husband from hell in Gaslight is the main reason why we refer “gaslighting” as a term for psychological abuse. You can’t deny that Boyer should’ve won that year.
Reasons: Well, losing to Spencer Tracy (twice) and Maximilian Schell is understandable. Yet, his loss to Bing Crosby might be more or less due to Crosby’s popularity as a beloved entertainer and easy going public persona. Didn’t hurt that Going My Way was a feel-good family film. Gaslight was neither but it’s still a far superior movie. Also, 1940s movie awards ceremonies weren’t known for giving Oscars for scary villain roles. Just look at why Richard Widmark lost to Edmund Gwenn.
Trivia: His performance in Algiers was an inspiration for Looney Tunes character Pepe Le Pew. Recorded an album in 1966 which was said to be one of Elvis Presley’s favorites. Awarded an honorary Oscar certificate for establishing the French Research Foundation in Los Angeles. Spoke 5 languages including German, Italian, and Spanish.

80. Edna May Oliver

Though Edna Mae Oliver didn't have the looks of a leading lady, she made up for it with her comedic talents that made her one of the best known character actresses in the 1930s. When asked why she played in comedy, she replied,

Though Edna Mae Oliver didn’t have the looks of a leading lady, she made up for it with her comedic talents that made her one of the best known character actresses in the 1930s. When asked why she played in comedy, she replied, “With a horse’s face, what more can I play?” though she did play drama occasionally.

Personal Life: (1883-1942) Born Edna May Nutter in Malden, Massachusetts. Dropped out of school at 14 to pursue a stage career and made her big break in 1917. Made her first film in 1923. Briefly married to David Welford Pratt. Tied of small intestinal complications at 59.
Famous for: American actress and one of the best known character players in the 1930s who often played tart-tongued spinsters. Mostly appeared in period pieces, particularly Charles Dickens adaptations. Notable roles are Mrs. Tracy Wyatt from Cimarron, Aunt March from Little Women, The Red Queen from Alice in Wonderland, Aunt Betsy Trotwood from David Copperfield, Miss Pross from A Tale of Two Cities, Juliet’s Nurse from Romeo and Juliet, Mrs. McKlennar from Drums Along the Mohawk, Maggie Sutton from The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle, Countess de Mavon from Nurse Edith Cavell, and Lady Catherine Brough from Pride and Prejudice.
Nominated for: Oliver was nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1939 for Drums Along the Mohawk.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1936 for Romeo and Juliet.
Reasons: 1939 was perhaps one of the worst years for an Oscar nominee in the actress categories for those who weren’t in Gone With the Wind. Also, as a character actress mostly known for playing older women, the Academy basically thought that Oliver would have another chance since she was expected to have a long career ahead of her. They didn’t expect she’d die so suddenly.
Trivia: Descendant of John Quincy Adams. Appeared on Broadway with a young Humphrey Bogart. Asked why she played predominantly comedic roles, she replied, “With a horse’s face, what more can I play?”

Advertisements

Movie Stars Who Have Never Won an Oscar: Part 7 – Joel McCrea to James Mason

Whether in real life or in The Postman Always Rings Twice, if you romance Lana Turner, you're probably not going to live happily ever after. Just ask her gangster boyfriend Joe Stompanato.

Whether in real life or in The Postman Always Rings Twice, if you romance Lana Turner, you’re probably not going to live happily ever after. Just ask her gangster boyfriend Johnny Stompanato who learned the hard way.

When looking at this list, you may notice that some of these actors have voices you might’ve heard in imitation whether it be by comics or on Saturday morning cartoons. A lot of movie stars from the Golden Age of Hollywood tend to be imitated by comedians, impersonators, and cartoonists long after they’re dead. Of course, this is no surprise since many of them had voices, looks, and mannerisms that were rather distinct. For a long time Warner Bros. cartoons would have voice talents specializing in celebrity impressions imitating actors like Edward G. Robinson, Peter Lorre, Kirk Douglas, Vincent Price, and others you’ll see in this series. Some movie stars have even been inspirations for cartoon characters as well. Yet, while some Oscar winners may drop off from the face of the earth after giving their speeches, those who are frequently mocked and parodied in cartoons and SNL will be remembered forever. In this selection, here are 10 more movie stars for your viewing pleasure. First, you have screen blondes like Lana Turner and Miriam Hopkins. Second, there’s song and dance sensation Robert Preston best known for The Music Man and “The Chicken Fat Song.” Then there is James Mason famous for his deep baritone English voice who also liked cats. After that is the legendary comic genius and impressionist extraordinaire, Peter Sellers. Next comes Sal Mineo and Dennis Hopper who were both featured as troublesome teenagers in Rebel Without a Cause where they both end up dead followed by utility player and Preston Sturges’ favorite Joel McCrea. Then there’s Brock Peters most famous for playing the black guy who got screwed in To Kill a Mockingbird. And finally, there is Chief Dan George who’s one of the best known Native American movie actors but treated show business as a retirement job. So for your viewing pleasure, here are 10 more stars who never won the little statuette called Oscar.

61. Joel McCrea

Though Joel McCrea's rugged versatility made him a durable lead in everything from romantic comedies to Preston Sturges movies, he would exclusively stick to westerns after 1946 mainly because he didn't want to be paired with a much young actress. Of course, he didn't see the irony that most real cowboys were in their 20s or younger and that many of them weren't white either.

Though Joel McCrea’s rugged versatility made him a durable lead in everything from romantic comedies to Preston Sturges movies, he would exclusively stick to westerns after 1946 mainly because he didn’t want to be paired with a much young actress. Of course, he didn’t see the irony that most real cowboys were in their 20s or younger and that many of them weren’t white either.

Personal Life: (1909-1990) Born in South Pasadena, California. Father was an executive for the L. A. Gas & Electric Company. Was a paperboy for The Los Angeles Times. Graduated from Pomona College in 1928 and started acting in the Pasadena Playhouse. Got his first substantial role in 1929 and moved to RKO. Married to Frances Dee for 57 years and had 3 sons. Died of pneumonia at 84.
Famous for: American actor whose career spanned 50 years and appeared in 90 films. Did a lot of movies with Miriam Hopkins and Barbara Stanwyck. Yet, he’s best known for some of his films by Preston Sturges and comedies during the 1940s. Made nothing but westerns after 1946 because he didn’t want to be cast with a substantially younger co-start as his love interest. Notable roles are Johnny Baker from Bird of Paradise, Sanger “Bob” Rainsford from The Most Dangerous Game, Ramsay MacKay from Wells Fargo, Johnny Jones / Huntley Haverstock from Foreign Correspondent, Joe Carter from The More the Merrier, John L. Sullivan from Sullivan’s Travels, Tom Jeffers from The Palm Beach Story, Steve Judd from Ride the High Country, and the Virginian.
Nominated for: Joel McCrea was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actor in 1941 for Sullivan’s Travels. It’s probably one of the best comedies ever made.
Reasons: McCrea mostly acted in comedies and westerns, which may give great box office returns but don’t make him eligible for many prestigious movie awards.
Trivia: Used to deliver newspapers to Cecil B. DeMille. Watched D. W. Griffith film Intolerance. Worked as a stunt double, bit player, and extra while in college. Held horses for Richard S. Hart and Tom Mix. Filmed a controversial nude scene with Dolores Del Rio in the early. Was friends with Will Rogers. Estate included working ranch property and made a lot of money selling it that he was a multimillionaire by the 1940s. Donated several acres of his land to the Conejo Valley YMCA. Went to school with Douglas Fairbanks Jr. Died on his 57th wedding anniversary.

62. Miriam Hopkins

Born in Georgia, Miriam Hopkins was one of the most prominent stars of the 1930s, particularly the Pre-Code era. She was also known for her long-running feud and well publicized fights with Bette Davis which might've started over her believing Davis was messing with her husband at the time. Bet the set of The  Old Maid had a lot of drama off-screen with these dames together.

Born in Georgia, Miriam Hopkins was one of the most prominent stars of the 1930s, particularly the Pre-Code era. She was also known for her long-running feud and well publicized fights with Bette Davis which might’ve started over her believing Davis was messing with her husband at the time. Bet the set of The Old Maid had a lot of drama off-screen with these dames together.

Personal Life: (1902-1972) Born in Savannah, Georgia but raised in Bainbridge. Attended the Goddard Seminary in Barre, Vermont and Syracuse University. At 20, became a chorus girl in New York City. Signed with Paramount Pictures in 1930 and made her first film the same year. Married 4 times with her third marriage being to Anatole Litvak and is said to adopt a son between marriages. Retired in 1970. Died of a heart attack in New York City at 69.
Famous for: American actress known for her versatility. Made a lot of films with Joel McCrea and Ernest Lubitsch. Notable roles are Princess Anna from The Smiling Lieutenant, Ivy Pearson from Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Lily from Trouble in Paradise, Gilda Farrell from Design for Living, Becky Sharp, Mary ‘Swan’ Rutledge from Barbary Coast, Martha Dobie from These Three, Delia Lovell Ralston from The Old Maid, Julia Hayne from Virginia City, Mrs. Leslie Carter from Lady with Red Hair, Aunt Lavinia from The Heiress, Fran Carleton from The Mating Season, and Lily Mortar from The Children’s Hour.
Nominated for: Hopkins was nominated for Best Actress in 1935 for Becky Sharp.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1949 for The Heiress. She really should’ve gotten something for that.
Reasons: Hopkins may have had a long but her glory days were in the 1930s, especially with the Pre-Hays Code era when films were a little more risqué (but not like today’s). Though she managed to reinvent herself as a supporting player, her stardom basically fizzled by the time 1940 rolled around.
Trivia: Had a long running feud with Bette Davis (who allegedly had a fling with her third husband Anatole Litvak). Distinguished Hollywood hostess who moved along intellectual and creative circles. Uncle was head of the Syracuse University Geology department. Was Margaret Mitchell’s first choice to play Scarlett O’Hara in Gone With the Wind.

63. Brock Peters

Though Brock Peters is best known for playing Tom Robinson from To Kill a Mockingbird, Star Trek fans are quick to point out he was Admiral Cartwright from The Voyage Home and Commander Sisko's dad from Deep Space Nine.

Though Brock Peters is best known for playing Tom Robinson from To Kill a Mockingbird, Star Trek fans are quick to point out he was Admiral Cartwright from The Voyage Home and Commander Sisko’s dad from Deep Space Nine.

Personal Life: (1927-2005) Born George Fisher in New York City. Father was a sailor. Wanted to be in show business since he was 10 and attended a performing arts high school. Studied physical education at City College of New York but quit when he landed a role in Porgy and Bess in 1949 and went on tour with the opera. Married to Dolores Daniels for 27 years.
Famous for: American actor best known for his performance as Tom Robinson from To Kill a Mockingbird. Notable roles are Sergeant Brown from Carmen Jones, Johnny from The L-Shaped Room, Matthew Robinson from Heavens Above!, Tom Robinson from To Kill a Mockingbird, Aesop from Major Dundee, Rodriguez from The Pawnbroker, Lieutenant Hatcher from Soylent Green, and Fleet Admiral Cartwright from Star Trek: The Voyage Home and Star Trek: The Undiscovered Country.
Nominated for: Peters was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1962 for To Kill a Mockingbird. Seriously, he should’ve gotten it easily.
Reasons: Well, until Sidney Poitier won the Oscar for Best Actor for his performance in Lilies of the Field in 1963, African American actors had a very small chance of winning the Oscar, especially in a non-stereotypical role.
Trivia: Played Commander Benjamin Sisko’s dad in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. Performed the eulogy at Gregory Peck’s funeral. Sang background vocals to Harry Belafonte’s “Banana Boat Song (Day-O)” and “Mama Look a Boo-Boo.” Also sang “Where” from Randy Weston’s Live at the Five Spot and shared vocal duties with Martha Flowers in Uhuru Africa. Was friends with Charlton Heston.

64. Dennis Hopper

It was very difficult for me to find a proper picture of Dennis Hopper since his appearance changes so much over his career. Nevertheless, he's had an illustrious film career with movies like Rebel Without a Cause, Giant, Cool Hand Luke, Easy Rider, Apocalypse Now, Blue Velvet, and Hoosiers.

It was very difficult for me to find a proper picture of Dennis Hopper since his appearance changes so much over his career. Nevertheless, he’s had an illustrious film career with movies like Rebel Without a Cause, Giant, Cool Hand Luke, Easy Rider, Apocalypse Now, Blue Velvet, and Hoosiers.

Personal Life: (1936-2010) Born in Dodge City, Kansas. Family moved to Kansas City, Missouri after WWII and attended Saturday art classes at the Kansas City Art Institute. At 13, family moved to San Diego where his mother was a lifeguard instructor while his father was a “post office manager” (but really an OSS agent or so he says). Studied acting at San Diego’s Old Globe Theater and the Actors’ Studio in New York studying under Lee Strasberg for 5 years. Married 5 times with Michelle Phillips as his second wife and had 1 child to each of his wives but her. Was in the process of divorcing his fifth wife Victoria Duffy at the time of his death and his estate was involved in an ugly inheritance dispute. Died of prostate cancer at 74.
Famous for: American actor, filmmaker, photographer, and artist whose career spanned for 55 years. Known for his unconventional style and as one of the “enfant terribles” in Hollywood. Best known roles are Goon from Rebel Without a Cause, Jordan Benedict III from Giant, Billy Clanton from Gunfight at the O. K. Corral, Tom Boyd from From Hell to Texas, Johnny Drake from Night Tide, Dave Hastings from The Sons of Kate Elder, Babalugats from Cool Hand Luke, Moon from True Grit, Billy from Easy Rider, Father from Rumble Fish, Kansas from The Last Movie, Daniel Morgan from Mad Dog Morgan, American Photojournalist from Apocalypse Now, Frank Booth from Blue Velvet, Shooter from Hoosiers, Howard Payne from Speed, Walter Pensky from Black Dahlia, Deacon from Waterworld, and Donald Greenleaf from Swing Vote.
Nominated for: Hopper was nominated twice for Original Screenplay in 1970 for Easy Rider with Peter Fonda and Terry Sothern and for Best Supporting Actor in 1987 for Hoosiers.
Most Crushing Loss: Not winning the screenplay for Easy Rider in 1970.
Reasons: He was said to be one of Hollywood’s most notorious drug addicts for 20 years as well as spent the 1970s and early 1980s living as a an outcast after the success of Easy Rider. Was also known for his troubled relationships with women (though I can easily see why his marriage with Michelle Phillips broke up after 2 weeks). Also spent periods being blackballed by the movie industry.
Trivia: Despite being a Republican in his later years, he supported Barack Obama in the 2008 election mostly over the selection of Sarah Palin as the Republican vice presidential candidate. Was a prolific photographer, painter, and sculptor. Was friends with Vincent Price and greatly admired James Dean. Loved Shakespeare.

65. Robert Preston

It's hard to imagine anyone else but Robert Preston as "Professor" Harold Hill a role he originated in The Music Man on film and Broadway which he won a Tony for. Yet, when casting was underway, Jack Warner wanted Frank Sinatra. Luckily, Meredith Willson insisted on the matter because Sinatra would've ruined it.

It’s hard to imagine anyone else but Robert Preston as “Professor” Harold Hill a role he originated in The Music Man on film and Broadway which he won a Tony for. Yet, when casting was underway, Jack Warner wanted Frank Sinatra. Luckily, Meredith Willson insisted on the matter because if Jack Warner had his way, there would’ve been trouble, right here in River City.

Personal Life: (1918-1987) Born Robert Preston Meservey in Newton, Massachusetts. Father was a garment worker and later billing clerk for American Express. Attended high school in Los Angeles. Studied acting at the Pasadena Community Playhouse. Joined the Army Air Corps during WWII where he served as an intelligence officer in Belgium where his main job was receive information from headquarters and briefing bomber crews on what to expect on their mission. He was also promoted to Captain. Was told by the studio not to use his family name. Married to Catherine Craig for 47 years. Was an intensely private person and doesn’t have an official biography to this day. Died of lung cancer at 68.
Famous for: American actor best remembered for originating the role of Harold Hill in The Music Man. Mostly appeared in westerns. Notable roles are Digby Geste from Beau Geste, Dan Cutler from Reap the Wild Wind, Michael Crane from This Gun for Hire, Francis Macomber from The Macomber Affair, James Cloud “The Wichita Kid” from The Sundowners, Harold Hill from The Music Man, Rubin Flood from The Dark at the Top of the Stairs, Ace Bonner from Junior Bonner, Beauregard Jackson Pickett “Beau” Burnside from Mame, Jay Follett from All the Way Home, Carole “Toddy” Todd from Victor Victoria, and Centauri from The Last Starfighter.
Nominated for: Preston was nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1983 for Victor Victoria.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actor in 1962 for The Music Man. Guess the 76 trombones was too much for the Academy.
Reasons: Let’s just say an actor who’s best known for doing westerns and musicals may win Tony Awards, but he’s not going to win prestigious acting prizes in Hollywood, especially if he sang the “Chicken Fat” song. Also, being one of the first actors to be nominated for an Oscar for playing a gay character.
Trivia: Won a Tony Award for playing Harold Hill in The Music Man on Broadway in 1957. Was Meredith Willson’s choice for the lead in the film while Frank Sinatra was Jack Warner’s. Also originated the role of Henry II during the Broadway production of The Lion in Winter. Sang the “Chicken Fat” song which was distributed to schools across the nation and played for students in calisthenics every morning (which you can listen to on the website of the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library. Really it’s the first result when you Google it.)

66. Chief Dan George

Though best known as a chief from Little Big Man and other movies, Chief Dan George was a very significant figure in Canada for working to promote better understanding between Native Americans and non-natives. He also gave speeches escalating Native American activism in the country touching widespread pro-native sentiment among non-natives.

Though best known as a chief from Little Big Man and other movies, Chief Dan George was a very significant figure in Canada for working to promote better understanding between Native Americans and non-natives. He also gave speeches escalating Native American activism in the country touching widespread pro-native sentiment among non-natives.

Personal Life: (1899-1981) Born Geswanouth Slahoot at Burrard Indian Reserve No. 3 in North Vancouver, Canada where his father was the tribal chief. Anglicized name Dan Slaholt was changed to George when he entered the mission boarding school where use of native language was discouraged, if not forbidden. Worked as a longshoreman, construction worker, and school bus driver. Was married and fathered 6 children. Died at 82.
Famous for: Canadian actor, poet, author, and chief of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation. Began his acting career for television at 60. May not have been the first Native American actors onscreen but he’s certainly one of the most famous since he’s certainly responsible for a more positive portrayal of Indians on film since the 1970s. Notable roles are Ol’ Antoine from Smith!, Old Lodge Skins from Little Big Man, Lone Watie from The Outlaw Josey Wales, and Sam Two Feathers from Harry and Tonto.
Nominated for: George was nominated for Best Supporting Actor for Little Big Man in 1970.
Most Crushing Loss: Not getting an Honorary Oscar he so greatly deserved.
Reasons: Sure he may have been one of the first real native actors a lot people have seen, but he’s better known for more comic and adventure works. Also had a short acting career and is a way more significant figure in Canada.
Trivia: Always insisted on playing “good” First Nation characters. Wrote, “My Heart Soars,” which was recited by Donald Sutherland at the Vancouver Winter Olympics in 2010. Band chief of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation from 1951–63 and his son is chief today. Was an influential speaker on the rights of native peoples in North America. Wrote 2 books of poetry. Awarded the Order of Canada in 1971. Recorded a single with Fireweed in 1974. Died on the same reservation he was born.

67. Sal Mineo

Sal Mineo was well known to play vulnerable but troubled adolescent boys like the incredibly messed up Plato from Rebel Without a Cause. Sadly, though Mineo was poised for a combat, he was stabbed to death in an alley behind his apartment building at 37.

Sal Mineo was well known to play vulnerable but troubled adolescent boys like the incredibly messed up Plato from Rebel Without a Cause. Sadly, though Mineo was poised for a comback, he was stabbed to death in an alley behind his apartment building at 37.

Personal Life: (1939-1976) Born in the Bronx, New York. Parents were coffin makers. Father was an Italian immigrant while Italian American mother was born in the United States. Mother enrolled him in dancing and acting school at an early age just to keep him from joining a street gang. Stabbed to death in an alley behind his apartment building by a pizza deliveryman named Lionel Williams at 37.
Famous for: American actor best known for his performance of John “Plato” Crawford in Rebel Without a Cause. Battled being typecast as a troubled teen later in his career. Notable roles are Jerry from Six Bridges to Cross, Cadet Col. Sylvester Dusik from The Private War of Major Benson, John “Plato” Crawford from Rebel Without a Cause, Romolo from Somebody Up There Likes Me, Angel Obregón II from Giant, White Bull from Tonka, Dov Landau from Exodus, Gene Krupa from The Gene Krupa Story, and George Blaylock from Stranger on the Run.
Nominated for: He was nominated twice for Best Supporting Actor in 1955 for Rebel Without a Cause and in 1960 for Exodus.
Most Crushing Loss: Not winning the Best Supporting Actor Oscar in 1955 for Rebel Without a Cause, which he really deserved. If there was any actor who could play a troubled teen, it would be him and Plato is probably one of cinema’s most messed up.
Reasons: To make a long story short, he was gay and his performances were said to reflect a homosexual subtext. Also, didn’t have a long career.
Trivia: One of the first major actors to publicly acknowledge his homosexuality. Directed an opera in Detroit. Beat out Clint Eastwood for a role in Six Bridges to Cross. Recorded a handful of pop songs and an album with 2 of his songs reaching the Top 40 and one selling a million copies that he was awarded a golden disc. Was a model for Harold Stevenson’s The New Adam, which is considered “one of the great American nudes.” Nickname was, “The Switchblade Kid.” Played on stage in original productions of The Rose Tattoo and The King and I. Played a bisexual burglar in P. S. Your Cat Is Dead around the time he was murdered.

68. Lana Turner

Lana Turner's discovery as a 16 year old girl at a Hollywood drug store is pure cinematic legend. Yet, her life would be filled with scandal for she has a similar husband count as Elizabeth Taylor and an even more chaotic love life. In fact, she's most noted for her  tempestuous relationship with gangster Johnny Stompanato who was stabbed to death with a kitchen knife by her teenage daughter Cheryl Crane in her mother's defense.

Lana Turner’s discovery as a 16 year old girl at a Hollywood drug store is pure cinematic legend. Yet, her life would be filled with scandal for she has a similar husband count as Elizabeth Taylor and an even more chaotic love life. In fact, she’s most noted for her tempestuous relationship with gangster Johnny Stompanato who was stabbed to death with a kitchen knife by her teenage daughter Cheryl Crane in her mother’s defense.

Personal Life: (1921-1995) Born Julia Jean Turner to teenaged parents in Wallace, Idaho. Father was a miner while mother would become a beautician. Parents separated after the family moved to San Francisco. In 1930, her father was found murdered on a San Francisco street the day after winning a craps game. The robbery and murder were never solved. In 1931, she and her mother moved to Los Angeles for her mother’s health and were so poor that her mom worked 80 hours a week to support them and she occasionally had to live with acquaintances and friends. Was discovered at a Hollywood drug store at 16 by someone from The Hollywood Reporter and was referred to Zeppo Marx. Made her first film in 1937. Married 8 times with first marriage to bandleader Artie Shaw and twice to second husband Joseph Stephen Crane and had daughter Cheryl with him. Private life was marred by personal turmoil as well as unsurprisingly battled substance abuse problems. Said she was an alcoholic who had 2 abortions and 3 stillbirths as well as slit her wrists in 1951. Yet she said she turned herself around in the 1970s. Retired in 1991. Died of throat cancer at 74. Left the bulk of her estate to her maid, which was contested by daughter Cheryl Crane.
Famous for: American actress often featured as an ingénue at first, before establishing herself as a leading lady. Nicknamed, “The Sweater Girl.” Notable roles are Cynthia Potter from Love Finds Andy Hardy, Rosalie Lewett from Calling Dr. Kildare, Patty Marlow from The Dancing Co-Ed, Sheila Regan from Ziegfeld Girl, Bea Emery from Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Elizabeth Cotton from Honky Tonk, Lisbeth Bard from Johnny Eager, Cora Smith from The Postman Always Rings Twice, Crystal Radek from The Merry Widow, Samarra from The Prodigal, Georgia Lorrison from The Bad and the Beautiful, Diane de Poitiers from Diane, Constance MacKenzie from Peyton Place, Lora Meredith from Imitation of Life, Sheila Cabot from Portrait in Black, Rosemary Howard from Bachelor in Paradise, and Holly Parker from Madame X.
Nominated for: Turner was nominated for Best Actress in 1957 for Peyton Place.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actress in 1946 for The Postman Always Rings Twice or in 1959 for Imitation of Life.
Reasons: Well, being cast as a sex symbol for one. Second, she was well known in Hollywood for dating often, marrying and divorcing often (granted most of her husbands were bonafide assholes and a few were even worse), changing partners often, and never shying away from how many lovers she had in her lifetime. Yet, she’s best remembered for her relationship to mob bodyguard/hitman, Johnny Stompanato which was marked by constant fighting and abuse as well as an incident where he threatened her and Sean Connery on the set with a gun (luckily Connery grabbed the gun out of Stompanato’s hand and twisted his wrist, causing him to back off. Yeah, that Sean Connery). Their relationship ended with her teenage daughter Cheryl stabbing Stompanato with a kitchen knife at her mother’s defense.
Trivia: Had auburn hair and dyed it blonde. Detested “The Sweater Girl” nickname. Romantically linked to Clark Gable and Tyrone Power.

69. Peter Sellers

Peter Sellers was a comic legend for being an excellent impersonator as well as capable of a wide variety of accents and gifted in taking multiple roles. However, he was a man with a legendary share of demons that sometimes made him terrible to work with.

Peter Sellers was a comic legend for being an excellent impersonator as well as capable of a wide variety of accents and gifted in taking multiple roles. However, he was a man with a legendary share of demons that sometimes made him terrible to work with.

Personal Life: (1925-1980) Born Richard Henry Sellers in Portsmouth, England. “Peter” was a childhood nickname. Parents were variety entertainers. Presented on stage as a baby. Had a very close relationship with his mother which Spike Milligan would refer as unhealthy for a grown man. Was also Jewish on his mother’s side. Learn stage craft from his parents and had mixed feelings for show business. Formal education ended at 14 due to WWII. Started as a janitor in the theater and worked his way up to box office clerk, usher, assistant stage manager, and lighting operator. Also worked as a drummer for various bands. Joined the Royal Air Force in 1943 though it’s unclear whether he volunteered or was drafted. Was kept on the ground due to poor eyesight. Yet, his show business career took off from there when he joined Squadron Leader Ralph Reader’s Gang Show. Married 4 times with model Brit Ekland as his second wife. Had 3 children to his first 2 wives (a daughter and son to first wife Anne Howe and a daughter to Ekland). Struggled with depression and mental insecurities throughout his life. Suffered a series of 8 heart attacks after taking amyl nitrites (poppers) in 1964 and his heart continued to deteriorate within the next 16 years. Had a lot of issues with drugs including an alcohol and cocaine dependency. In 1977, he had another heart attack and was fitted with a pacemaker. Died of a heart attack at 54.
Famous for: British actor, comedian, and singer. Started on the BBC Goon Show. Was known for his many film characterizations. Versatility enabled him to portray a wide range of comic characters using different accents and guises, and he would often assume multiple roles within the same film, frequently with contrasting temperaments and styles. Satire and black humor were a main feature in many of his movies. Made over 50 films. Notable roles are Fred Kite from I’m All Right Jack, Clare Quilty from Lolita, Mr. Robinson from The Ladykillers, Prime Minister Amphibulos from Carlton-Browne of the F.O., Grand Duchess Gloriana XII, Prime Minister Count Rupert Mountjoy, and Tully Bascombe from The Mouse that Roared, Dr. Ahmed el Kabir from The Millionairess, Inspector Jaques Clouseau from The Pink Panther series, Group Captain Lionel Mandrake, President Merkin Muffley, and Dr. Strangelove from Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, Henry Orient from The World of Henry Orient, Doctor Fritz Fassbender from What’s New, Pussycat?, Aldo Vanucci from After the Fox, Harold from I Love You, Alice B. Toklas, Sir Guy Grand KG, KC, CBE from The Magic Christian, Sidney Wang from Murder By Death, Rudolf IV, Rudolf V, Syd Frewin from The Prisoner of Zenda, and Chance from Being There.
Nominated for: Sellers was nominated twice for Best Actor in 1964 for Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb and 1979 for Being There.
Most Crushing Loss: Sellers should’ve won the Oscar for Best Actor in 1979 for Being There. Sure Dustin Hoffman is a good actor but his role as a divorced dad was nothing compared to Sellers’ playing a sheltered guy who’s seen as an intellectual sage that he’s certainly not.
Reasons: Well, Sellers was known for having a lot of problems. His behavior off-screen was often erratic and compulsive. Frequently clashed with directors, producers, and co-stars, especially during the 1970s when his physical and mental health as well as substance abuse problems were at their worst. His on-and-off set tantrums were legion, especially when he was doing commercials. This with a demanding style got him a lot of bad press. And this is why we’ll never know whether Sellers walked off the set of Casino Royale or got fired (yet he did get in a fistfight with one of directors and tried to upstage Orson Welles). Was also allegedly a domestic abuser. Still, Blake Edwards said of him, “At times, Peter was more or less great fun. The other times he was Hell.”
Trivia: Had an infatuation for Sophia Loren and declared his love for her in front of his first wife (of course knowing her relationship with Carol Ponti, it was unrequited). Married second wife Brit Ekland just 10 days after meeting her. Was close friends with Anthony Armstrong Jones, 1st Earl of Snowdon best known as the husband to Princess Margaret. Was a comic inspiration for Monty Python. Believed in astrology and spiritualism. Described as, “the greatest comic genius this country has produced since Charles Chaplin.” TCM called him, “one of the most accomplished comic actors of the late 20th century.” Recorded a lot of songs that became hits in the 1960s. Had “In the Mood” played at his funeral a song he hated. Thought that nobody would attend his funeral because of his torrid personal life but thousands did. Third wife became a Countess of Stockton while fourth wife later married David Frost. Was friends with the Beatles. One of Elvis Presley’s favorite actors who had his films with him on the airplane when he was on tour. Spoke highly of Steve Martin and Robin Williams before his death. Was an amateur photographer and camera nut.

70. James Mason

Though known for his lovely British accent and gentleman good looks which made him ideal to cast as a villain, Mason was an avid cat lover and co-wrote and illustrated a book with his then-wife which he recounted tales of some of the cats (and some dogs) he'd known and love. He also helped save some Buster Keaton films which might've been lost forever if he didn't have them put in safety stock.

Though known for his lovely British accent and gentleman good looks which made him ideal to cast as a villain, Mason was an avid cat lover and co-wrote and illustrated a book with his then-wife which he recounted tales of some of the cats (and some dogs) he’d known and love. He also helped save some Buster Keaton films which might’ve been lost forever if he didn’t have them put in safety stock.

Personal Life: (1909-1984) Born in Huddersfield, West Riding Yorkshire, England. Father was a wealthy textile merchant. Attended Cambridge University. Had no formal training as an actor and initially became involved in theater as a hobby since he planned a career as an architect. Made his stage debut in 1931 before joining The Old Vic. Made his film debut in 1935 but mostly starred in British films until after WWII. Registering as a conscientious objector during the war led to a break with his family for many years. Suffered a severe heart attack in 1959. Settled in Switzerland in 1963. Married twice and had 2 children with first wife Pamela Mason. Died of a heart attack at 75.
Famous for: British actor who made the transition to the United States after achieving much success in the United Kingdom. Roles ranged from hard-bitten and melancholy protagonists to more heroic figures and sometimes outright villains. His languid but impassioned voice and good looks made him well suited for almost anything. His mellifluous and distinctive voice managed to convey volumes of emotion while often remaining surprisingly understated. Played a lot of aristocrats. Notable roles are Lord Rohan from The Man in Grey, Nicholas from The Seventh Veil, Gustave Flaubert from Madame Bovary, Field Marshal Erwin Johannes Rommel from The Desert Fox: The Story of Rommel, The Captain (‘The Secret Sharer’) from Face to Face, Brutus from Julius Caesar, Norman Maine from A Star Is Born, Captain Nemo from 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, Phillip Vandamm from North by Northwest, Sir. Oliver S. Lindenbrook from Journey to the Center of the Earth, Sir Edward Carson from The Trials of Oscar Wilde, Prof. Humbert Humbert from Lolita, Norman Main from A Star Is Born, Timonides from The Fall of the Roman Empire, Gentleman Brown from Lord Jim, James Leamington from Georgy Girl, Emperor Franz-Joseph from Mayerling, Trigorin from The Sea Gull, General Count von Klugermann from The Blue Max, Ed Concannon from The Verdict, Captain Hughes from Yellowbeard, and Sir Randolph Nettleby from The Shooting Party.
Nominated for: Mason was nominated 3 times 1 for Best Actor and 2 for Best Supporting Actor consisting of: 1954 for a Star Is Born, 1966 for Georgy Girl, and 1982 for The Verdict.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actor in 1962 for Lolita.
Reasons: I’d say he was more or less burned by the competition, especially in the 1954 Oscar race in which Marlon Brando won for On the Waterfront.
Trivia: Loved animals, particularly cats. He and first wife Pamela wrote a book called The Cats in Our Lives which he mostly wrote and illustrated. In this he recounted all the humorous and sometimes touching tales about all the cats and dogs he had known and loved. In 1952, he bought a house previously owned by Buster Keaton and discovered several nitrate film reels of some of the silent actor’s previously lost movies, which he arranged to have them transferred to safety stock and saved them from being permanently lost. Read the eulogy at Judy Garland’s funeral. Was a friend and neighbor to Charlie Chaplin as well as was buried near him.

Movie Stars Who Have Never Won an Oscar: Part 6 – Victor Mature to Walter Pidgeon

The 1950s were known as the decade Hollywood produced all these biblical epics such as Samson and Delilah, The Robe, Ben Hur, and The Ten Commandments. Of course, Cold War logic aside, these movies fared well with Hollywood since biblical subjects were deemed perfectly acceptable by the moral guardians as well as gave them the opportunity to show scantily clad actors at the same time. Not to mention, box office gold.

The 1950s were known as the decade Hollywood produced all these biblical epics such as Samson and Delilah, The Robe, Ben Hur, and The Ten Commandments. Of course, Cold War logic aside, these movies fared well with Hollywood since biblical subjects were deemed perfectly acceptable by the moral guardians as well as gave them the opportunity to show scantily clad actors at the same time. Not to mention, box office gold.

When watching a movie, there are some actors who you recognize no matter what roles they’re in since you see their name listed high on the credits and their picture on a magazine cover. Then there are actors who may pop up now and then, yet whenever you recognize them, you say, “That person looks familiar, I wonder where I’ve seen him or her before,” “Is that what’s his/her face?,” or “Is he that guy from…” etc. Of course, those in the latter category tend to be known as character actors who usually play supporting roles. Some may fit a certain type, while some may play a whole range. Some may win Oscars but most don’t. However, unlike leading movie stars, they enjoy steady careers and are rarely out of work. Yet, whoever they are, Hollywood can’t do without them for they’re essential to any movie cast. Now in this selection, we have 10 more legends of the silver screen you may or may not recognize. First, there are character acting legends Eli Wallach, Claude Rains, and Lee J. Cobb. Second, you have actresses Vera Miles and Janet Leigh both best known for appearing in Psycho. Then there is Ann Blyth who usually played nice girls but is best known as Mildred Pierce’s eternally ungrateful daughter from hell. After that you have Walter Pidgeon, a Canadian actor notable for his films with Greer Garson and practically not aging for years as well as Dana Andrews best known for playing hard boiled detectives in the 1940s and a vet who can’t go back to being a soda jerk. Last but not least, there’s Victor Mature who was a mainstay in 1950s sword and sandal epics as well as Hollywood sex siren and World’s Sexiest Inventor Hedy Lamarr. So without further adieu, here are 10 more non-Oscar winning stars for your reading pleasure.

51. Victor Mature

According to Neatorama, Victor Mature was the first Hollywood hunk. And it was during the premiere of Samson and Delilah, Groucho Marx would remark about him, "I can't enjoy any picture where the leading man's chest is bigger than the leading lady's."

According to Neatorama, Victor Mature was the first Hollywood hunk. And it was during the premiere of Samson and Delilah, Groucho Marx would remark about him, “I can’t enjoy any picture where the leading man’s chest is bigger than the leading lady’s.”

Personal Life: (1913-1999) Born in Louisville, Kentucky. Father was an Italian immigrant who anglicized his name and worked as a cutler. Had a brother who died of osteomyelitis at 11 years old. Attended the Virginia Military Institute and Spencerian Business School. Sold candy and operated a restaurant before moving to California. Studied acting at the Passedena Community Playhouse while living in a tent for 3 years. Spotted by a Hal Roach talent scout. Married 5 times. Died of leukemia at 86.
Famous for: American actor and leading man with a career that spanned 45 years. Best known for appearing in sword and sandal films as well as appearing bare chested in them. Yet, he was seen by producers as a low risk, scandal-free, leading man. Notable roles are Tumak from One Billion Years B. C., William Trainor from No, No, Nanette, Doc Holliday from My Darling Clementine, Nick Bianco from Kiss of Death, Samson from Samson and Delilah, Demetrius from The Robe and Demetrius and the Gladiators, Chief Crazy Horse, Jed Cooper from The Last Frontier, Hannibal, Horemheb from The Egyptian, and Tony Powell from After the Fox.
Nominated for: Mature was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Should’ve been nominated for a Best Supporting Actor in 1953 for The Robe.
Reasons: Let’s just say appearing in enough films with his shirt off led to him being derided by male critics. Not to mention, he was seen more or less as a Hollywood hunk and sex symbol, even in biblical movies like Samson and Delilah. As Groucho Marx said, “I can’t enjoy any picture where the leading man’s chest is bigger than the leading lady’s.”
Trivia: Served in the Coast Guard during WWII and did a series of War Bond tours and morale shows in 1944. Was also engaged to Rita Hayworth and Anne Shirley. Loved golf and had his San Diego house built to overlook the ninth hole of the Rancho Santa Fe Golf Course. Savvy real estate investments and booming television market allowed him to take on roles he wanted and whenever he wanted them.

52. Janet Leigh

Though Janet Leigh is killed off halfway through Psycho, her death scene is perhaps one of the most iconic in movie history. Of course, after that Leigh was so traumatized by the scene, she went to great lengths to avoid taking them for the rest of her life.

Though Janet Leigh is killed off halfway through Psycho, her death scene is perhaps one of the most iconic in movie history. Of course, after that Leigh was so traumatized by the scene, she went to great lengths to avoid taking showers for the rest of her life.

Personal Life: (1927-2004) Born Jeanette Helen Morrison in Merced, California. Daughter of Danish immigrants who worked at a ski resort called Sugar Bowl. Discovered by Norma Shearer in 1945 and showed her to talent agent Lew Wasserman while vacationing there. Prior had attended University of the Pacific where she studied music and psychology but left for MGM. Had no prior acting experience prior to the contract and was placed under the tutelage of drama coach Lillian Burns. Appeared in a radio anthology series at 19 and made her first film in 1947. Married 4 times with third marriage being to Tony Curtis and had Jamie Lee and Kelly to him. Married to fourth husband Robert Brandt for 42 years. Suffered from vasculitis and peripheral neuropathy, which caused her right hand to become gangrenous. Died of a heart attack at 77.
Famous for: American actress best remembered for her role in Psycho. Appeared in 5 movies with third husband Tony Curtis. Notable roles are Lissy Anne MacBean from The Romance of Rosy Ridge, Effie Bright from If Winter Comes, Margaret ‘Meg’ March/Brooke from Little Women, June Forsyte from That Forsyte Woman, Connie Ennis from Holiday Affair, Jennifer Paige Angels in the Outfield, Aline de Gavrillac de Bourbon from Scaramouche, Bess Houdini from Houdini, Lina Patch from The Naked Spur, Princess Aleta from Prince Valiant, Lady Anne from The Black Shield of Falworth, Eileen Sherwood from My Sister Eileen, Susan ‘Susie’ Vargas from Touch of Evil, Morgana from The Vikings, Marion Crane from Psycho, Eugenie Rose Chaney from The Manchurian Candidate, Rosie DeLeon from Bye Bye Birdie, Susan Harper from Harper, Mary Ann from Grand Slam, Gert Meredith from One Is a Lonely Number, Gerry Bennett from Night of the Lepus, and Florence Cohen from Boardwalk.
Nominated for: Leigh was nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1960 for Psycho.
Most Crushing Loss: Well, she probably should’ve beat Shirley Jones for Best Supporting Actress in 1960. I mean who can forget her in the iconic shower scene though Jones was good, too. Perhaps not receiving an honorary Oscar is more crushing.
Reasons: Maybe because the studios weren’t happy about her and Curtis getting together. Then again, it could be just getting burned by the competition. Also was seen more as a sex symbol in many of her roles such as Marion Crane.
Trivia: Wrote 4 books. Served on the board of directors of the Motion Picture and Television Foundation. Was so traumatized from the shower scene from Psycho that she avoided showers for the rest of her life.

53. Vera Miles

Before she was an actress known for westerns and Hitchcock films, Vera Miles was a beauty queen from Kansas. Of course, she would've became a big star if she didn't get pregnant when Alfred Hitchcock decided to film Vertigo.

Before she was an actress known for westerns and Hitchcock films, Vera Miles was a beauty queen from Kansas. Of course, she would’ve became a big star if she didn’t get pregnant when Alfred Hitchcock decided to film Vertigo.

Personal Life: (1929-present) Born Vera June Ralston in Boise City, Oklahoma. Grew up in Pratt, Kansas and Wichita. Moved to Los Angeles in 1950 where she landed small roles on film and TV. Made her first film in 1952. Married 3 times and had 4 children. Took the name Miles from her first husband. Retired in 1995 and refuses to grant interviews or make public appearances as of 2015.
Famous for: American actress best known for working closely with Alfred Hitchcock. Career spanned for 45 years. Notable roles are Denny Burke from The Rose Bowl Story, Jill Hardy from Tarzan’s Hidden Jungle, Laurie McCoy from Wichita, Laurie Jorgensen from The Searchers, Jean Lennox from 23 Paces to Baker Street, Virginia Hanson from Autumn Leaves, Betty Compton from Beau James, Lucy Ann Hardesty from The FBI Story, Rose Balestrero from The Wrong Man, Virginia Killain from A Touch of Larceny, Lila Crane from Psycho, Liz Saxon from Back Street, Hallie Stoddard from The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence, Dorothy Williams from A Tiger Walks, Lydia (Liddy) Calloway from Those Calloways, Vida Downey from Follow Me, Boys!, Ellen Wedloe from Gentle Giant, Madelyn Buckman from Hellfighters, and Joan Caper from Into the Night.
Nominated for: Miles was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1960 for Psycho.
Reasons: She usually identified as an icy Hitchcock blonde than anything. Also, her movies after the 1960s aren’t very well known and was typecast as wives, love interests, and mothers. Still, she was a rather underrated actress who didn’t take showy roles that usually land Oscar nominations anyway.
Trivia: Was Miss Kansas in 1948 and third runner up for Miss America. Appeared on Groucho Marx’s You Bet Your Life as a “beauty contest winner” in 1951. Has a son named Michael Scott.

54. Ann Blyth

Veda: "You think just because you've made a little money you can get a new hairdo and some expensive clothes and turn yourself into a lady. But you can't, because you'll never be anything but a common frump, whose father lived over a grocery store and whose mother took in washing. With this money, I can get away from every rotten, stinking thing that makes me think of this place or you!" Though she started out playing sweet and demure teenagers, most people remember Ann Blyth as the eternally ungrateful Veda from Mildred Pierce.

Veda: “You think just because you’ve made a little money you can get a new hairdo and some expensive clothes and turn yourself into a lady. But you can’t, because you’ll never be anything but a common frump, whose father lived over a grocery store and whose mother took in washing. With this money, I can get away from every rotten, stinking thing that makes me think of this place or you!”
Though she started out playing sweet and demure teenagers, most people remember Ann Blyth as the eternally ungrateful Veda from Mildred Pierce.

Personal Life: (1928-present) Born in Mount Kisco, New York. Parents divorced shortly after her birth. Debuted on Broadway in 1941. Signed to Universal and made her first film in 1944. Married to Dr. James McNulty for 54 years and had 5 children. Lived in La Jolla and Toluca Lake, California. Retired in 1985.
Famous for: American actress and singer often cast in Hollywood musicals, but also successful in dramatic roles. Notable roles are Bessie Jo Kirby from Bowery to Broadway, Veda Pierce from Mildred Pierce, Ruth from Brute Force, Sheila Carrson from Killer McCoy, Doris Mead from A Woman’s Vengeance, Regina Hubbard from Another Part of the Forest, Lenore the Mermaid from Mr. Peabody and the Mermaid, Dorothy Benjamin from The Great Caruso, Princess Shalimar from The Golden Horde, Valerie Carns from Thunder on the Hill, Countess Marina Selanova from The World in His Arms, Rose Marie Lemaitre from Rose Marie, Kathie Ruder from The Student Prince, Lady Mary from The King’s Thief, Marsinah from Kismet, Gloria Brent from The Buster Keaton Story, and Helen Morgan from The Helen Morgan Story.
Nominated for: Blyth was nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1945 for Mildred Pierce.
Most Crushing Loss: Losing to Anne Revere in the 1945 Best Supporting Actress race she should’ve one. I mean her performance as the scheming and ungrateful Veda Pierce has made more mothers feel better about their teenage daughters than anyone else in movie history. I mean this girl can really play a bitch, to put it lightly.
Reasons: Though Blyth would have a long acting career as an actress, she would quit movies in 1957 and would spend the rest of it in musical theater, television, and summer stock. Also, the Academy probably preferred to award the Oscar to women playing kind, endearing mothers than possibly psychopathic daughters from hell.
Trivia: Her and husband James McNulty received the rank of Lady and Knight of the Holy Sepulchre by Cardinal Cook. Sister-in-law of singer Dennis Day. Married a man named James McNulty (which is ironic since there’s a guy from The Wire with the same name who’s a womanizing drunk whose catchphrase is, “What the fuck did I do?”). Received a Cadillac and swimming pool from Howard Hughes.

55. Hedy Lamarr

Hedy Lamarr might've been cast in movies to look pretty for the camera as the "world's most beautiful woman." Yet, she co-invented the technology for spread spectrum and frequency hopping communications which have been  incorporated into Wi-Fi, CDMA and Bluetooth technology.

Hedy Lamarr might’ve been cast in movies to look pretty for the camera as the “world’s most beautiful woman.” Yet, she co-invented the technology for spread spectrum and frequency hopping communications which have been incorporated into Wi-Fi, CDMA and Bluetooth technology. But it was only after her death she was inducted into The National Inventors Hall of Fame. But in Hollywood, she was just a sex symbol.

Personal Life: (1914-2000) Born Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler in Vienna during the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Father was a banker and mother was a concert pianist. Made her first film in 1933 at 18. Fled her Nazi first husband and Germany for Paris in 1937 and was discovered by Louis B. Mayer who signed her to an MGM contract. Arrived in Hollywood in 1938. Married 6 times and had 3 children. Became a US citizen in 1953. Retired in 1958. Was arrested for shoplifting in 1966 and 1991. Was estranged from her son James for almost 50 years (and left him out of her will but he sued her $3.3 million estate). Had plastic surgery in her later years. Died in Casselberry, Florida of heart failure, chronic valvular heart disease, and arteriosclerotic heart disease at 85.
Famous for: Austrian American actress who became a star in the 1930s to the 1950s in glamorous parts alongside leading men and was promoted as the “world’s most beautiful woman.” Had a controversial nude sex scene in Ecstasy. Notable roles are Eva Hermann from Ecstasy, Gaby from Algiers, Manon deVargnes Carey from Lady of the Tropics, Karen Vanmeer from Boom Town, Sandra Kolter from Ziegfeld Girl, Dolores Ramirez from Tortilla Flat, Lucienne Talbot from Crossroads, Tondelayo from White Cargo, Irene Von Mohr from The Conspirators, Madeleine Damien from Dishonored Lady, Delilah from Samson and Delilah, and Joan of Arc from The Story of Mankind.
Nominated for: Lamarr was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not receiving an honorary Oscar or a Science or Technical Award for being a pioneer in Wi-Fi which probably has made movie making a hell of a lot easier, especially since filmmaking is a collaborative effort, especially nowadays.
Reasons: Lamarr was basically typecast as a sex symbol whose roles emphasized her beauty and sexuality but were light on lines. Also, the Science and Technical field in the Academy is a male dominated field. Still, the main reason she’s on here has more to do with her inventing a world changing communications technology in her spare time.
Trivia: Co-created a frequency hopping and spread spectrum with neighbor and avant garde composer, George Antheil as a way to help counter torpedoes which became important to the US military during WWII. Both were inducted into the Inventors Hall of Fame in 2014. Also invented an improved traffic stop light and a tablet that would dissolve in water to create a carbonated beverage, which she said tasted like Alka-Seltzer. First husband was a weapons seller who had government ties to Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany. Hosted lavish parties with her first husband, sometimes with Hitler and Mussolini in attendance (no wonder she ran away from him). Sued Mel Brooks for $10 million for invasion of privacy on the unauthorized use of her name in Blazing Saddles (which was settled out of court).

56. Eli Wallach

Erick Wallach has been known as one of the greatest character actors of stage and screen. Yet, out of his 6 decade film career, he's most famous as Tuco from The Good, the Bad, and The Ugly.

Erick Wallach has been known as one of the greatest character actors of stage and screen. Yet, out of his 6 decade film career, he’s most famous as Tuco from The Good, the Bad, and The Ugly.

Personal Life: (1915-2014) Born in Brooklyn, New York City to Jewish immigrants from Poland. Parents owned Bertha’s Candy Store. Graduated with a degree in history from the University of Texas at Austin. Earned a master’s degree in education from the City College of New York. Gained his first method acting experience at the Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theatre in New York City where he studied under Sanford Meisner. Drafted into the US Army in 1941 serving as a staff sergeant in a military hospital in Hawaii and was later commissioned as a second lieutenant after going through Officer’s Candidate School in Texas for medical administrative work. Served in Casablanca and France during WWII. Made his Broadway debut in 1945. Film debut was in 1956. Married to Anne Jackson for 65 years and had 3 children. Was a teetotaler. Lost sight in his left eye due to a stroke. Died of natural causes at 98.
Famous for: American actor whose career spanned over 60 years. TCM states he’s “one of the greatest ‘character actors’ ever to appear on stage and screen,” with over 90 film credits. He and his wife were one of the best known acting couples in America on stage. Founding member of the Actor’s Studio where he studied under Lee Strasberg. His versatility gave him the ability to play a wide variety of different roles throughout his career, primarily as a supporting actor. Notable roles are Silva Vacarro from Baby Doll, Calvera from The Magnificent Seven, Guido from The Misfits, the General from Lord Jim, Tuco from The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, Davis Leland from How to Steal a Million, Ben Baker from McKenna’s Gold, Cotton Weinberger from The Two Jakes, Don Altobello from The Godfather Part III, Mr. Loonie from Mystic River, and Old Man from The Ghost Writer.
Nominated for: Wallach was never nominated for an Oscar but he received an honorary one which he deserved.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1966 for The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly.
Reasons: Let’s just say making Babydoll during the 1950s might’ve had something to do with it. I mean that film was very controversial back in the day. Then again, it did manage to get nominated for stuff. Then again, it could just as well being burned by the competition.
Trivia: While at Austin, he performed plays with Ann Sheridan and Walter Cronkite. Also learned to ride horses there, too. He and his unit wrote a play that inspired Irving Berlin’s This Is the Army. Nearly died 3 times while filming The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. Great-uncle of critic A. O. Scott. Had to ask John Huston how to play a drunk while filming The Misfits. Played Mr. Freeze on Batman.

57. Dana Andrews

During the 1940s, Dana Andrews played disillusioned and bitter average Joes as well as hardboiled detectives that fit quite well with the post-WWII golden age of film noir. Yet, by the 1950s, he was mostly acting in B-movies.

During the 1940s, Dana Andrews played disillusioned and bitter average Joes as well as hardboiled detectives that fit quite well with the post-WWII golden age of film noir. Yet, by the 1950s, he was mostly acting in B-movies.

Personal Life: (1909-1992) Born in Collins, Mississippi to a family with 13 children. Father was a Baptist minister. Moved and grew up in Huntsville, Texas. Attended Sam Houston State University where he studied business administration and moved to Los Angeles in 1931 to become a singer. Worked various jobs that included pumping gas. Employer paid for his studies in opera and theater school at the Pasadena Playhouse. Film career began in 1940. Married twice and had 4 children (1 to first wife Janet Murray and 3 to second wife Mary Todd). Married to second wife Mary Todd for 53 years. Suffered from alcoholism and managed to get sober in the 1970s. Near the end of his life he suffered from Alzheimer’s. Died of congestive heart failure and pneumonia at 88.
Famous for: American actor who was one of Hollywood’s biggest stars in the 1940s and continued acting into the 1980s though in less prestigious roles. Appeared in 5 films with Gene Tierney. Notable roles are Joe Lilac from Ball of Fire, Donald Martin from The Ox-Bow Incident, Mark McPherson from Laura, Captain Fred Derry from The Best Years of Our Lives, Detective Sgt. Mark Dixon from Where the Sidewalk Ends, Edward Mobley from While the City Sleeps, Tom Garrett from Beyond Reasonable Doubt, John Holden from Night of the Demon, Alan Eaton from The Fear Makers, Scott Freeman from Airport 1975, and Red Ridingwood from The Last Tycoon.
Nominated for: Andrews was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Being the only one from the 3 leads not being nominated for his performance in 1946 for The Best Years of Our Lives. Also not being nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1943 for The Ox-Bow Incident.
Reasons: Andrews was an alcoholic and by the 1950s his drinking was really starting to derail his career that it almost cost him his life on the highway. Then again, it might’ve been that he was just burned by the competition.
Trivia: In 1972, he appeared in a public service announcement on alcoholism. Older brother of Steve Forrest from S. W. A. T. and Dallas. President of the Screen Actors Guild from 1969-1970. Was friends with Burt Lancaster who suffered a paralyzing stroke while visiting him which took his life 2 years later. Also buddies with Vincent Price, Henry Fonda, Jimmy Stewart, Gene Tierney, Barbara Stanwyck, and Anne Bancroft.

58. Lee J. Cobb

#3: "Everything... every single thing that came out in that courtroom, but I mean everything... says he's guilty. What d'ya think? I'm an idiot or somethin'? Why don't cha take that stuff about the old man; the old man who lived there and heard everything? Or the business about the knife! What, just because he found one exactly like it? The old man saw him. Right there on the stairs. What's the difference how many seconds it was? Every single thing. The knife falling through a hole in his pocket...you can't prove that he didn't get to the door! Sure, you can hobble around the room and take all the time you want, but you can't prove it! And that stuff with the El! And the movies! Now there's a phony deal if I ever saw one. I'd betcha five thousand dollars I'd remember the names of the movies I saw! I'm tellin' ya: every single thing that has went on has been twisted... and turned. This business with the glasses. How do you know she didn't have 'em on? This woman testified in open court! And that thing about hearin' the kid yell... huh? Listen, I've got all the facts here... [He struggles with his notebook, throws it on the table] Ah! Well, there it is! That's the whole case! [He turns towards the window as the other jurors stare at him] Well, SAY SOMETHING! ...You lousy bunch of bleedin' hearts. You're not goin' to intimidate me! I'm entitled to my own opinion! [Sees the picture of his son on the table] Rotten kids...you WORK YOUR LIFE OUT! [He lunges at the picture and tears it to pieces. He suddenly realizes what he's doing, stops, then breaks down] No. Not guilty. Not guilty!" Lee J. Cobb was a prolific 1950s character actor known for playing intimidating, arrogant, and abrasive characters from Johnny Friendly to Juror #3. He also played Willy Loman on Broadway and was accused of Communism during the Red Scare.

Lee J. Cobb was a prolific 1950s character actor known for playing intimidating, arrogant, and abrasive characters from Johnny Friendly to Juror #3. He also played Willy Loman on Broadway and was accused of Communism during the Red Scare.

Personal Life: (1911-1976) Born Leo Jacob in the Bronx, New York City to a Jewish family of Russian and Romanian extraction. Father was a compositor for a foreign language newspaper. Studied at New York University and made his acting debut in 1934 before joining the Group Theatre in 1935. Married twice and had 2 children from each of his marriages. Died of a heart attack at 64.
Famous for: American actor who typically played arrogant, intimidating, and abrasive characters, but often had roles as respectable figures such as judges and police officers.
Nominated for: Cobb was nominated twice for Best Supporting Actor in 1954 for On the Waterfront and 1958 for The Brothers Karamazov. Notable roles are Mr. Bonaparte from Golden Boy, Dr. Dozous from The Song of Bernadette, Brian Kelly in Call Northside 777, Johnny Friendly from On the Waterfront, Judge Bernstein from The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit, Juror #3 from 12 Angry Men, Fyodor Karamazov from The Brothers Karamazov, Barak Ben Canaan from Exodus, and the Editor from MacKenna’s Gold.
Most Crushing Loss: Should’ve been nominated in 1957 for Best Supporting Actor in 12 Angry Men. Also should’ve won in 1955 for On the Waterfront.
Reasons: He was accused of being a Communist in 1951 and testified before the House Committee on Un-American Activities which he refused until threatened with a blacklist 2 years later. Then he named 20 names as former members of the Communist Party USA. You can see why some of his peers might’ve been a bit uneasy on awarding him an Oscar.
Trivia: Played Willy Loman in the original Broadway production of Death of a Salesman. Served in the First Motion Picture Unit of the US Armed Forces during WWII. Buried in Los Angeles’ Mount Sinai Memorial Park Cemetery. Died a day before Exodus co-star Sal Mineo was murdered.

59. Claude Rains

In Casablanca, Claude Rains is best known as Capt. Louis Renault who says, "Round up the usual suspects." Yet, while Claude Rains's short stature kept him from being a leading man except in The Invisible Man, his lovely English voice and gentlemanly demeanor kept him employed.

In Casablanca, Claude Rains is best known as Capt. Louis Renault who says, “Round up the usual suspects.” Yet, while Claude Rains’s short stature kept him from being a leading man except in The Invisible Man, his lovely English voice and gentlemanly demeanor kept him employed.

Personal Life: (1889-1967) Born in London. Said to grow up with a very serious Cockney accent and a speech impediment. Father was also an actor in stage and film. Made his stage debut at 11. Was discovered by Sir Herbert Beerborn Tree who paid for him to have the elocution lessons he needed to succeed as an actor at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, where he later taught. Served in WWI in which he was involved in a gas attack that made him nearly blind in his left eye for the rest of his life. Became a US citizen in 1939. Married 6 times and had a daughter to his 4th wife Frances Propper. Died from an abdominal hemorrhage in Laconia, New Hampshire at 77.
Famous for: British American actor whose career spanned for 46 years. Best known for being nominated for Best Supporting Actor 4 times but never won, a record he shares with Arthur Kennedy. Began his acting career on the London stage, moved to Broadway in the 1920s, and made his first film in 1933. Notable roles are the Invisible Man, Prince John from The Adventures of Robin Hood, Dr. Alexander Tower from Kings Row, Sen. Joseph Harrison Paine from Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Don José Alvarez de Córdoba from The Sea Hawk, Mr. Jordan from Here Comes Mr. Jordan, Sir John Talbot from The Wolf Man, Dr. Jaquith from Now, Voyager, Captain Louis Renault from Casablanca, Captain Freycinet from Passage to Marseilles, Job Skeffington from Mr. Skeffington, Alex Sebastian from Notorious, and Mr. Dryden from Lawrence of Arabia.
Nominated for: Rains was nominated 4 times all for Best Supporting Actor consisting of: 1939 for Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, 1942 for Casablanca, 1943 for Mr. Skeffington, and 1945 for Notorious.
Most Crushing Loss: I’d like to say he was robbed for playing possibly the nicest Nazi ever portrayed on film for 1946 yet, I don’t think anyone was going to beat Harold Russell in that race. Perhaps maybe his 1942 loss to Charles Coburn but then again, Coburn was fairly good, too. Just not as memorable as Claude Rains playing Renault.
Reasons: Well, being burned by the competition could apply to 1939, 1942, and 1945 since the nominees from the 1939 and 1942 came from movies we now consider classics. Not to mention, there was no way he’d win against Harold Russell in 1946. As for 1944, well, I haven’t seen Mr. Skeffington yet so I can’t say about that one.
Trivia: While at RADA as a teacher, his students included Sir John Gielgud and Sir Laurence Olivier. Gielgud would say of him many years later, “He was a great influence on me. I don’t know what happened to him. I think he failed and went to America.” During WWI, he served in the London Scottish regiment alongside Ronald Colman, Herbert Marshall, and Basil Rathbone as well as promoted from Private to Captain by the end. Bought the Stock Grange Farm in West Bradford Township, Pennsylvania in 1941 and would spend time between takes reading on agricultural techniques. However, he sold it when he and his 4th wife divorced in 1956.

60. Walter Pidgeon

Walter Pidgeon often said about his career: "Maybe it was better never to become red hot. I'd seen performers like that, and they never lasted long. Maybe a long glow is the best way. At Metro I was never considered big enough to squire around Norma Shearer or Joan Crawford or Greta Garbo. Well, I outlasted them all at MGM, didn't I? It takes a lot of work to appear easy going, and I tried to avoid being stuffy." And believe it or not, he was also said to be a classically trained baritone.

Walter Pidgeon often said about his career: “Maybe it was better never to become red hot. I’d seen performers like that, and they never lasted long. Maybe a long glow is the best way. At Metro I was never considered big enough to squire around Norma Shearer or Joan Crawford or Greta Garbo. Well, I outlasted them all at MGM, didn’t I? It takes a lot of work to appear easy going, and I tried to avoid being stuffy.” And believe it or not, he was also said to be a classically trained baritone. Then again, Pidgeon was a Canadian so I’m sure it wasn’t too difficult to be easygoing.

Personal Life: (1897-1984) Born in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada. Father was a haberdasher. Studied law and drama at the University of New Brunswick, which was only interrupted by his WWI service in the 65th Royal Canadian Artillery where he’d only be crushed by two guns in an accident resulting in a 17 month stay at a military hospital and never saw action. After the war, worked as a bank runner in Boston while studying voice at the New England Conservatory of Music. Yet, he soon got tired with banking and moved to New York where he can prove he could act and sing to E. E. Clive. Made his Broadway debut in 1925. Married twice and had a daughter to first wife Edna Pickles. Married to second wife Ruth Walker for 47 years.
Famous for: Canadian American actor who starred in many films with a career spanning over 50 years. Made 9 movies with Greer Garson and did a number of silent films. When talkies came, he starred in some early Technicolor musicals. Notable roles are Mr. Gruffydd from How Green Was My Valley, Clem Miniver from Mrs. Miniver, Pierre Curie from Madame Curie, Major Augustus Parkington from Mrs. Parkington, William Sylvester Packett from Julia Misbehaves, Young Jolyon Forsyte from That Forsyte Woman, Harry Pebbel from The Bad and the Beautiful, Dr. Edward Morbius from Forbidden Planet, Florenz Ziegfeld from Funny Girl, Senate Majority Leader Robert “Bob” Munson from Advise & Consent, Casey from Harry in Your Pocket, and James Ellswirth from The Last Time I Saw Paris.
Nominated for: Pidgeon was nominated twice for Best Actor consisting of 1943 for Mrs. Miniver and 1944 for Madame Curie.
Most Crushing Loss: Not getting nominated for Best Supporting Actor for How Green Was My Valley. As far as I know this is one of the few films in which he uses an accent.
Reasons: I think this might have more to do with him being nominated for playing the husband to Greer Garson’s protagonist. Also for not talking like an English guy in Mrs. Miniver. Not to mention, you don’t give an Oscar to a guy named, “Pidgeon.”
Trivia: His first wife’s name was Pickles. Was a classically trained baritone. President of the Screen Actors Guild from 1952-1957. Hobbies included tending to his rose garden and playing bridge. Donated his body to UCLA Medical School for research and medical purposes.

Movie Stars Who Have Never Won an Oscar: Part 5 – Thelma Ritter to Brian Donlevy

Dr. Frankenstein:

Dr. Frankenstein: “My grandfather’s work was doodoo! I am not interested in death! The only thing that concerns me is the preservation of life! [jams the scalpel into his leg, lets go of the scalpel and it sticks upright out of his leg, grasps it again, then slowly crosses his legs to block the scalpel from view] Class… is… dismissed.” Gives me giggles every time.

As I said before, most movie stars don’t win Oscars. Of course, sometimes it’s expected since many of our best known stars work in genres that seldom get Oscar recognition like action movies, horror films, sci-fi and fantasy movies, westerns, or comedy even though many of these genres generate top box office dollar. Now this selection features many stars who are very much legends in their own right even in genres that end up falling prey to the Academy’s snobbery since it’s run by white middle aged men who’d rather see dramas. First, you have respected supporting players Thelma Ritter and Arthur Kennedy who both received about 5 Oscar nominations each without winning. Not to mention, Sydney Greenstreet best for his roles in Casablanca and The Maltese Falcon. You also have men like Joseph Cotten and Brian Donlevy who specialized in both. Then there’s Gene Wilder best known for his collaborations with Mel Brooks, Willy Wonka, and his marriage to Gilda Radner. Next you have the one and only Bruce Lee who everyone knows had no shot at getting an Oscar in the first place but since he contributed so much to movies, martial arts, and entertainment, you can’t have a series like this without him. After that is song and dance sensation Ann Miller whose shoes you can view at the Smithsonian followed by frequent John Wayne leading lady and onscreen abuse target Maureen O’Hara. Finally, we conclude with Veronica Lake best known for her appearances in film noir, her peek-a-boo hairstyle, and her steep decline in the 1950s due to alcoholism and mental illness. So for your viewing and entertaining pleasure, here are 10 more actors and actress who’ve never got to make the Oscar speech.

41. Thelma Ritter

Thelma Ritter was one of the most acclaimed character actresses during the Golden Age of Hollywood. She's best known for playing smartass working class women wish New York accents. Yet, one of her biggest credited roles was Birdie from All About Eve.

Thelma Ritter was one of the most acclaimed character actresses during the Golden Age of Hollywood. She’s best known for playing smartass working class women wish New York accents. Yet, one of her biggest credited roles was Birdie from All About Eve, where she’s the only one Eve Harrington can’t fool.

Personal Life: (1902-1969) Born in Brooklyn, New York City. Trained as an actress at the American Academy for Dramatic Arts and performed in stock companies before taking a hiatus to raise her kids. Married to Joseph Moran for 42 years and had 2 children. Made her first film in 1947. Died of a heart attack at 66.
Famous for: American actress best known for her comedic roles as working class characters with a strong New York accent. Received 6 nominations for Best Supporting Actress without winning. Prone to play smart asses. One of the most recognizable and imitable female voices ever (which says a lot). Notable roles are Peter’s Mother from Miracle on 34th Street, Sadie Dugan from A Letter to Three Wives, Mrs. Katie Cusack from City Across the River, Birdie Coonan from All About Eve, Ellen McNulty from The Mating Season, Clancy from With a Song in My Heart, Stella from Rear Window, Moe Williams from Pickup on South Street, Alma from Pillow Talk, Isabelle Steers from The Misfits, Elizabeth Stroud from Birdman of Alcatraz, and Bertha from Boeing Boeing.
Nominated for: Ritter was nominated 6 times for Best Supporting Actress consisting of 1950 for All About Eve, 1951 for The Mating Season, 1952 for With a Song in My Heart, 1953 for Pickup on South Street, 1959 for Pillow Talk, and 1962 for Birdman of Alcatraz.
Most Crushing Loss: Not receiving an honorary Oscar for her career which she probably would’ve gotten if she didn’t die so soon. Either that or losing to Josephine Hull in 1950, yet she was quite good in Harvey but that was the only year she had a real chance to win. Seriously, even in movies where she doesn’t receive credit, you still know who she is.
Reasons: Ritter was nominated in very bad years and was just burned by the competition. I mean she lost to Josephine Hull, Kim Hunter, Gloria Grahame, Donna Reed, Shelley Winters, and Patty Duke. Of course, the Academy probably thought she’d have her chance and didn’t bet she’d die of a heart attack at 66 considering that her career was doing very well by then.
Trivia: Won a Tony for Lead Actress in a Musical. Hosted the Oscars one year with Bob Hope.

42. Gene Wilder

Whether it's giving you nightmares as Willy Wonka or his collaboration with Mel Brooks, Gene Wilder has managed to entertain generations of moviegoers since the 1960s. Of course, he basically came up with his stage name since he thought he'd end up a serious actor. Yet, you know how that turned out.

Whether it’s giving you nightmares as Willy Wonka or his collaboration with Mel Brooks, Gene Wilder has managed to entertain generations of moviegoers since the 1960s. Of course, he basically came up with his stage name since he thought he’d end up a serious dramatic actor playing Macbeth. Yet, you know how that turned out.

Personal Life: (1933-2016) Born Jerome Silberman to a Jewish family in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Wanted to be an actor since he was 8. At 15, mother sent him to a military school in Hollywood where he wrote about being bullied and sexually assaulted for being the only Jewish kid so he returned home and became involved with community theater. Graduated from the University of Iowa in 1955 as well as studied at the Old Vic and HB Studio. In 1956, he was drafted into the army and was assigned to the Medical Corps where he served as a paramedic at the Valley Forge Army Hospital. Mother died from ovarian cancer in 1957. Supported himself through acting school as a limo driver and fencing instructor. Changed his name to Gene Wilder at 26 and studied under Lee Strasberg at the Actors’ Studio. Was discovered by Mel Brooks and Anne Bancroft during a performance of Mother Courage and Her Children in 1963. Married 4 times with Gilda Radner as his 3rd wife. Hasn’t done an acting gig since 2003 but lived in semi-retirement. Was hospitalized with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in 1999 but has been in complete remission since 2005. Died in his 1734 Colonial home in Stamford, Connecticut he’s resided in since his marriage to Radner of complications from Alzheimer’s he had been suffering for the past 3 years at 83.
Famous for: American actor, director, screenwriter, author, and activist. Career spanned for 42 years. Best known for his films with Gilda Radner and Mel Brooks. One of the most iconic and influential comic actors in the latter half of the 20th century. Notable roles are Eugene Grizzard from Bonnie and Clyde, Leo Bloom from The Producers, Willy Wonka from Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, Dr. Doug Ross from Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex* (*But Were Afraid to Ask), Jim, “The Waco Kid” from Blazing Saddles, Dr. Frederick Frankenstein from Young Frankenstein, The Fox from The Little Prince, Sigerson Holmes from The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes’ Smarter Brother, George Caldwell from Silver Streak, Avram Belinski from The Frisco Kid, Skip Donahue from Stir Crazy, Teddy Pierce from The Woman in Red, and Dave Lyon from See No Evil, Hear No Evil.
Nominated for: Wilder was nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1969 for The Producers and in 1974 with Mel Brooks for Best Adapted Screenplay.
Most Crushing Loss: Not winning the Oscar for adapted screenplay for Young Frankenstein. Seriously, it’s one of the funniest movies of all time and one of the most quotable. At least Mel Brooks thanked him 3 times in his Oscar speech for The Producers.
Reasons: No matter how good an actor Wilder was, he wouldn’t win an Oscar since he’s considered a comic actor.
Trivia: Wrote 6 books. Co-founded Gilda’s Club and helped found the Gilda Radner Ovarian Cancer Detection Center in Los Angeles. Met his current wife who was a clinical Supervisor at the New York League for the Hard of Hearing and coached him in lip reading while he was doing See No Evil, Hear No Evil.

43. Bruce Lee

Bruce Lee is one of the biggest pop culture icons of the 20th century and one of the most influential martial artists of all time. He's also credited with helping change the way Asians are presented in American films. So this makes him a worthy addition.

Bruce Lee is one of the biggest pop culture icons of the 20th century and one of the most influential martial artists of all time. He’s also credited with helping change the way Asians are presented in American films. So this makes him a worthy addition.

Personal Life: (1940-1973) Born in San Francisco (but he had many names so I’m not going to list them). Father was a famous Chinese opera singer and family moved back to Hong Kong when he was 3 months old. Spent nearly 4 years under Japanese occupation during WWII. Was trained in martial arts by the Yip Man after getting involved in a series of street fights. Father introduced him to the film industry and appeared in several films as a child actor. Moved to the United States at 18 with only $100 to finish high school in Seattle. In 1961, enrolled in the University of Washington to major in drama and started teaching martial arts. Dropped out of college in 1964 and moved to Oakland. Acting career in Hollywood began in 1964 after competing in the Long Beach Karate Championships and fight with Wong Jack Man. Married to Linda Emery and had 2 children. Son Brandon died of a prop gun accident on the set of The Crow in 1993. Died of a brain aneurysm at 32 caused by a reaction between painkillers and brain swelling medication.
Famous for: Hong Kong American actor, actor, martial arts instructor, philosopher, filmmaker, and founder of Jeet Kune Do. Considered to be one of the most influential martial artists of all time and pop culture icon of the 20th century. Often credited with helping to change how Asians were presented in films. Started out as a child actor and appeared in 20 films by 18. Sparked a huge interest for Chinese martial arts in the West during the 1970s. Notable roles are Winslow Wong from Marlowe, Cheng Chao-an from The Big Boss, Cheng Chao-an from Fist of Fury, Tang Lung from The Way of the Dragon, and Lee from Enter the Dragon. Also played Kato from The Green Hornet on TV.
Nominated for: Lee was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: He probably should’ve at least gotten an Honorary Oscar for helping how Asians are presented in film but didn’t live long enough.
Reasons: Face it, Lee’s movies were made as action films and never meant to win Oscars in the least.
Trivia: Wrote poetry. Philosophical influences include Taoism, Jiddu Krishnamurti, and Buddhism. Was well read and had an extensive library. Was really into physical fitness and tried bodybuilding. Taught martial arts to James Coburn, Kareem Abdul-Jabar, Roman Polanski, Lee Marvin, Joe Lewis, and Chuck Norris.

44. Joseph Cotten

Uncle Charlie: “Women keep busy in towns like this. In the cities it’s different. The cities are full of women, middle-aged widows, husbands dead, husbands who’ve spent their lives making fortunes, working and working. Then they die and leave their money to their wives. Their silly wives. And what do the wives do, these useless women? You see them in the hotels, the best hotels, every day by the thousands, drinking the money, eating the money, losing the money at bridge, playing all day and all night, smelling of money. Proud of their jewelry but of nothing else. Horrible, faded, fat, greedy women.” Joseph Cotten may not have played a gorgeous leading man who gets the girl but he was one of Orson Welles’ closest friends and most valued collaborators. With his great versatility, he played men ranging from disillusioned nice guys to the Merry-Widow murdering Uncle Charlie from Shadow of a Doubt.

Personal Life: (1905-1994) Born in Petersburg, Virginia. Father was an assistant postmaster. Studied at the Hickam School of Speech and Expression in Washington D. C. for acting. Worked as an advertising agent, lifeguard, shipping clerk, salesman for vacuums, paint, and potato salad, and theater critic for the Miami Herald before being involved with theater in Virginia and New York City. Debuted on Broadway in 1930 and met Orson Welles 4 years later while they were doing a radio show. Was an inaugural member of his Mercury Theater in 1937. Married twice with both marriages lasting at least 30 years. Adopted a stepdaughter to first wife Leonore Kipp. Suffered a stroke that cut his career short in 1981 which temporarily made him unable to speak. In 1990, his larynx was removed due to cancer. Died of pneumonia at 88.
Famous for: American actor who achieved prominence on Broadway in original productions of The Philadelphia Story and Sabrina Fair. Gained worldwide fame for appearing in Orson Welles’s movies such as Citizen Kane, The Magnificent Ambersons, and Journey Into Fear. Went on to become one of the leading Hollywood actors of the 1940s. Career spanned for 50 years. Notable roles are Jed Leland for Citizen Kane, Eugene Morgan from The Magnificent Ambersons, Charles Oakley from Shadow of a Doubt, Brian Cameron from Gaslight, Jesse McCanless from Duel in the Sun, Eben Adams from Portrait of Jeannie, Holly Martins from The Third Man, Samson Flusky from Under Capricorn, Allen Quinton from Love Letters, George Loomis from Niagara, Coroner from Touch of Evil, Dr. Drew Bayliss from Hush..Hush, Sweet Charlotte, William R. Simonson from Soylent Green, and Henry L. Stimson from Tora! Tora! Tora!.
Nominated for: Cotten was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1941 for Citizen Kane or 1943 for Shadow of a Doubt. Seriously, he’s the ultimate evil uncle in Shadow of a Doubt in the most twisted way.
Reasons: Being Orson Welles’s BFF probably hurt his chances more than anything when it came to movie awards when he was at the height of his stardom in the 1940s.
Trivia: Was best man at Orson Welles’ wedding to Rita Hayworth. Modeled for the cover of the September issue for The American Magazine. Played Cary Grant’s character from The Philadelphia Story on Broadway but his agent talked him out of reprising his role for the film. Also credited with the screenplay for Journey Into Fear.

45. Sydney Greenstreet

Caspar Gutman: “Well, Wilmer, I’m sorry indeed to lose you, but I want you to know I couldn’t be fonder of you if you were my own son. Well, if you lose a son, it’s possible to get another. There’s only one Maltese falcon. When you’re young, you simply don’t understand these things.” Throughout his acting career, Sydney Greenstreet refused to make movies until he was 62. Yet, he probably caved after receiving the script to The Maltese Falcon in which he earned an Oscar nomination for his role as Caspar Gutman or “The Fat Man.” Yet, he was burned by the competition.

Personal Life: (1879-1954) Born in Sandwich, Kent in England. Father was a leather merchant. One of 8 siblings. At 18, left his home to make his fortune as a Ceylon tea planter but drought forced him out of business. Took acting lessons just to escape the boredom managing a brewery. Made his stage debut in 1902, yet refused to appear in a movie until he was 62 despite many offers. Signed on to Warner Brothers in 1941. Dorothy Marie Ogden in 1918 and had one son. Suffered from diabetes and Bright’s Disease. Retired from film in 1949. Died from diabetic complications at 74.
Famous for: Versatile English actor who didn’t appear in films until he was 62 but enjoyed a string of hits during his 8 year career at Warner Bros. Appeared in 9 films with Peter Lorre. Best known roles are Caspar Gutman from The Maltese Falcon, Signor Ferrari from Casablanca, Major Duval from Passage to Marseille, Ricardo Quintanilla from The Conspirators, Supt. George Edward Grodman from The Verdict, and Sheriff Titus Semple from Flamingo Road.
Nominated for: Greenstreet was nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1941 for The Maltese Falcon.
Most Crushing Loss: Losing to Donald Crisp during the 1941 Oscar race. Should’ve gotten his hands on that statuette for The Maltese Falcon.
Reasons: Until Casablanca came out, Warner Bros. wasn’t seen as a reputable studio equivalent to MGM. I mean this was a studio that just made gangster films to save money. Also Greenstreet wasn’t in movies for long.
Trivia: Tennessee Williams dedicated The Last of My Solid Gold Watches to him.

46. Ann Miller

Dancing for her supper since 13 to support her and her deaf mother during the Depression, Ann Miller was said to tap 500 times a minute thanks to the magic of sound editing. Her shoes are displayed at the Smithsonian and was parodied by Molly Shannon several times on SNL.

Dancing for her supper since 13 to support her and her deaf mother during the Depression, Ann Miller was said to tap 500 times a minute thanks to the magic of sound editing. Her shoes are displayed at the Smithsonian and was parodied by Molly Shannon several times on SNL.

Personal Life: (1923-2004) Born Johnnie Lucille Collier in Chireno, Texas. Father was a criminal lawyer and womanizer. Started taking dance lessons at 5 after suffering from rickets. Moved to Los Angeles at 9 when her parents separated and worked as a nightclub dancer and showgirl because her deaf mother had a hard time finding work where she started going by Ann Miller. Was discovered at a San Francisco club by Lucille Ball and a talent scout/agent at 13 (though she told them she was 18) as well as received an RKO contract. Made her first film in 1934. Married 3 times and had a daughter who died at birth. Retired in 2001. Died of lung cancer at 80.
Famous for: American actress, dancer, and singer best remembered for her work in Hollywood musicals during the 1940s and 1950s. Was noted as a dance prodigy. Notable roles are Annie from Stage Door, Essie Carmichael from You Can’t Take It With You, Hilda from Room Service, Kitty Brown from Time Out for Rhythm, Nadine Hale from Easter Parade, Lola from Go West, Young Lady, Claire Huddesen from On the Town, Fiesta Specialty Dancer from The Kissing Bandit, Lois Lane ‘Bianca’ from Kiss Me Kate, Dance specialty in ‘Artists and Models’ from Deep in My Heart, Ginger from Hit the Deck, Gloria from The Opposite Sex, and Catherine ‘Coco’ Lenoix from Muholland Drive.
Nominated for: Miller was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not receiving an honorary Oscar for her career. Seriously, the Academy should give her some recognition since she has her shoes displayed at the freaking Smithsonian! That alone really shows that she’s an American treasure.
Reasons: Well, when she was just starting out, Miller lied about her age (though she had to use her dancing skills to support her and her deaf mother). Also, she was kind of underappreciated in her career even though she was mostly in musicals and comedies. Not to mention, her film career was effectively over by 1956.
Trivia: Romantically linked to Howard Hughes, Conrad Hilton, and Louis B. Mayer. Attorney father represented men like Machine Gun Kelly, the Barrow Gang, and Baby Face Nelson. Helped popularized pantyhose in the 1940s. Said to tap 500 times per minute but it most of her tap dancing sounds were actually dubbed by sound engineers since her dancing shoes had rubber soles made for a slippery set. Favorite pair of tap shoes are on display at the Smithsonian she named “Moe and Joe.” Won the Sarah Siddons Award in 1983. Was interested in psychic phenomena and claimed to be the reincarnation of the Egyptian Queen Hathshepsut. Refused to do movies for a long time due to content of nudity, sex, and violence but agreed to do Muholland Dr. which features explicit sex, nudity, and graphic violence.

47. Maureen O’Hara

The feisty Irish redhead Maureen O'Hara is best known as John Wayne's love interest in 5 of his best known movies. Yet, she also starred with other leading men like Tyrone Power, Victor McLagen, Douglas Fairbanks Jr., Paul Henreid, John Garfield, and Joel McCrea. Not to mention, she took time off from acting to be the first women CEO and president of an airline, that she took over after her third husband's death in a plane crash.

The feisty Irish redhead Maureen O’Hara is best known as John Wayne’s love interest in 5 of his best known movies. Yet, she also starred with other leading men like Tyrone Power, Victor McLagen, Douglas Fairbanks Jr., Paul Henreid, John Garfield, and Joel McCrea. Not to mention, she took time off from acting to be the first women CEO and president of an airline, that she took over after her third husband’s death in a plane crash.

Personal Life: (1920-present) Born Maureen FitzSimons in Dublin, Ireland. Father was in the clothes business as well as part owner of a soccer team. Mother was a former opera contralto and a successful women’s clothier. Trained as an actress at the Abbey Theatre and the Ena Mary Burke School of Drama and Elocution. Joined a theater company at 10. Yet, to satisfy her practical dad’s wishes, she enrolled in business school and became a bookkeeper and typist. Made her first film in 1938. Became a US citizen in 1946 and holds dual citizenship. Marred 3 times and had a daughter to second husband Will Price. Retired in 2000 for good. Has homes in Ireland, Arizona, and the Virgin Islands. Suffered a stroke in 2005.
Famous for: Irish American actress and singer noted for playing fiercely passionate heroines with a highly sensible attitude. Often worked with John Ford and John Wayne. One of the last living actresses from the Golden Age of Hollywood. Notable roles are Mary Yellen from Jamaica Inn, Esmeralda from The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Sydney Fairfield from A Bill of Divorcement, Angharad from How Green Was My Valley, Mary Carter from To the Shores of Tripoli, Lady Margaret Denby from The Black Swan, Toni Donne from The Fallen Sparrow, Louisa Frederici Cody from Buffalo Bill, Contessa Francesca from The Spanish Main, Julie Beck / Weatherly from Sentimental Journey, Shireen from Sinbad the Sailor, Doris Walker from Miracle on 34th Street, Mrs. Kathleen Yorke from Rio Grande, Mary Kate Danaher from The Quiet Man, Joanna Dana from Malaga, Lady Godiva from Lady Godiva of Coventry, Sylvia Merrill from Lisbon, Beatrice Severn from Our Man in Havana, Margaret “Maggie” McKendrick from The Parent Trap, Katherine Gilhooley McLintock from McClintock!, Martha McCandles from Big Jake, and Rose Muldoon from Only the Lonely.
Nominated for: O’Hara was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Actress in 1939 for The Hunchback of Notre Dame. At least she won an honorary Oscar for her career.
Reasons: Well, she mostly acted in westerns and adventure films. Also was usually overshadowed by John Wayne even though he was a really terrible actor (no offense but he’s very much overrated).
Trivia: Was the CEO of her third husband’s airline after his death in a plane crash on a Grumman Goose which she later sold. Third husband was also a former Brigadier general in the US Air Force. Sister Peggy joined the Sisters of Charity. Charles Laughton was her mentor. Took and transcribed John Ford’s production notes for The Quiet Man. Was Grand Marshal for New York City’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade in 1999.

48. Veronica Lake

Veronica Lake was star who received critical acclaim in movies like Sullivan's Travels and as a femme fatale in film noir in the 1940s. She was also a major fashion icon with her signature

Veronica Lake was star who received critical acclaim in movies like Sullivan’s Travels and as a femme fatale in film noir in the 1940s. She was also a major fashion icon with her signature “peek-a-boo” hairstyle and sex symbol despite being barely 5 feet tall. Yet, she’d suffer decline due to alcoholism, mental illness, and having a difficult personality.

Personal Life: (1922-1973) Born Constance Frances Marie Ockelman in Brooklyn, New York City. Father worked for an oil company aboard a ship and died of an industrial explosion in Philadelphia in 1932. Mother soon remarried a newspaper staff artist and she adopted her stepfather’s surname, Keane. Spent part of her childhood in Saranac Lake, New York and Miami, Florida. Was expelled from an all-girls Catholic school in Canada. According to her mother, she had a troubled childhood and was diagnosed as a schizophrenic. Moved to Beverly Hills in 1938 and attended the Bliss-Hayden School of Acting and started working in films as an extra. Made her first film in 1939. Married 4 times and had 4 kids. By the late 1940s, she had struggles with mental illness and alcoholism as her career declined. In 1951, the IRS seized her and second husband Andre de Toth’s home for unpaid taxes and they declared bankruptcy. This led her to leave her husband for New York. In the late 1950s she drifted between cheap hotels and was arrested several times for public drunkenness and disorderly conduct. Diagnosed with cirrhosis of the liver in 1973 and died of hepatitis and acute renal failure in Vermont at 50.
Famous for: American actress who won popular and critical acclaim for her comedies and femme fatale roles in film noir during the 1940s. Well known for her peek-a-boo hairstyle. Appeared in several movies with Alan Ladd because they were both short. Notable roles are Sally Vaughn from I Wanted Wings, The Girl from Sullivan’s Travels, Ellen Graham from This Gun for Hire, Janet Henry from The Glass Key, Jennifer from I Married a Witch, Dora Bruckmann from The Hour Before Dawn, Joyce Harwood from The Blue Dahlia, Susan Cleaver from Saigon, and Dr. Elaine Frederick from Flesh Feast.
Nominated for: Lake was never nominated for an Oscar.
Most Crushing Loss: Not being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1941 for Sullivan’s Travels. This is probably her best role and she was pretty convincing dressed as a boy.
Reasons: She had a complex personality and a reputation of being difficult to work with. Co-star Eddie Bracken would say, “She was known as ‘The Bitch’ and she deserved the title.” Was also typecast as a Hollywood sex symbol, had a drinking problem, as well as issues with mental illness. Not to mention, her peek-a-boo hairstyle might’ve hurt her career in the late 1940s when the US government encouraged women to adopt more practical looks and her stardom was short lived. Was even sued for non-support by her own mother.
Trivia: Some of her ashes were found in a New York antique store in 2004. Popular pin-up girl in WWII and traveled across the country to raise war bonds. Earned her pilot’s license in 1946 and flew solo from New York to Los Angeles. Romantically linked to Howard Hughes and Aristotle Onassis.

49. Arthur Kennedy

Though he usually played supporting roles, Arthur Kennedy was a highly accomplished actor who was nominated for an Oscar 5 times and was among the original casts in 3 of Arthur Miller's best known plays like Death of a Salesman, My Three Sons, and The Crucible.

Though he usually played supporting roles, Arthur Kennedy was a highly accomplished actor who was nominated for an Oscar 5 times and was among the original casts in 3 of Arthur Miller’s best known plays like Death of a Salesman, My Three Sons, and The Crucible.

Personal Life: (1914-1990) Born in Worcester, Massachusetts. Father was a dentist. Attended the Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh where he received a B. A. in drama in 1934. Joined the Group Theatre in New York in 1937. Discovered by James Cagney and made his first movie in 1940. Married to Mary Cheffrey for 37 years and had 2 children. Had problems with alcoholism, failing eyesight, and thyroid cancer in his later life. Died of a brain tumor in Branford, Connecticut at 75.
Famous for: American actor known for his versatility in supporting roles and his ability to create, “an exceptional honesty and naturalness on stage.” Shares the record with Claude Raines as being nominated for 4 Best Supporting Actor Oscars without winning a single one. Notable roles are Eddie Kenny from City of Conquest, Red from High Sierra, Tom Wingfield from The Glass Menagerie, Connie Kelly from Champion, Larry Nevins from Bright Victory, Vic Hansbro from The Man from Laramie, Deputy Sheriff Jesse Bard from The Desperate Hours, Bernard Castle from Trial, Lucas Cross from Peyton Place, Frank Hirsh from Some Came Running, Jim Lefferts from Elmer Gantry, Jackson Bentley from Lawrence of Arabia, Bill Bowdrie from Nevada Smith, and Couglin from Signs of Life.
Nominated for: Kennedy was nominated 5 times with 4 for Best Supporting Actor and 1 for Best Actor consisting of: 1949 for Champion, 1951 for Bright Victory, 1955 for Trial, 1957 for Peyton Place, and 1958 for Some Came Running.
Most Crushing Loss: Losing Best Supporting Actor to Red Buttons in 1957 since Lucas Cross was very much his best role in his career.
Reasons: He was probably a classic case of just being burned by the competition since acting races during the 1950s were especially brutal competition.
Trivia: Member of the original cast of Death of a Salesman and received a Tony Award for his performance as Biff Loman. Also was among the original casts in All My Sons, The Price, and The Crucible. Served in the Army Air Corps between 1943 and 1945 making aviation training films. Buried in Nova Scotia with his wife.

50. Brian Donlevy

Though Brian Donlevy usually played supporting roles and villains, he's best known now as playing the lead in The Great McGintry, in which he starts out as a homeless bum who rises to become a governor of a state all with the help of political corruption.

Though Brian Donlevy usually played supporting roles and villains, he’s best known now as playing the lead in The Great McGintry, in which he starts out as a homeless bum who rises to become a governor of a state all with the help of political corruption.

Personal Life: (1901-1972) Born in Armaugh, Ireland. Moved to the Sheboygan Falls, Wisconsin between 1910 and 1912. Father was a supervisor for the Brickner Woolen Mills. At 14, he lied about his age to volunteer in the Wisconsin National Guard for the Pancho Villa expedition as a bugler. In 1917, he went to France to fight WWI. Began his acting career in theater and silent films during the 1920s and his big movie break came in 1935. Married 3 times and had a daughter to second wife Marjorie Lane. Died of throat cancer at 71.
Famous for: Irish American actor known for playing dangerous tough guys from the 1930s to the 1960s. Usually played supporting roles. Said in his Times obituary that, “any consideration of the American ‘film noir’ of the 1940s would be incomplete without him.” Notable roles are Knuckles Jacoby from Barbary Coast, Sergeant Markoff from Beau Geste, Daniel McGinty from The Great McGinty and The Miracle of Morgan’s Creek, Kent from Destry Rides Again, Trampas from The Virginian, Paul Madvig from The Glass Key, and Assistant District Attorney Louis D’Angelo from Kiss of Death.
Nominated for: Donlevy was nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1939 for Beau Geste.
Most Crushing Loss: Probably not being nominated for The Great McGinty.
Reasons: Well, he was just burned by the competition in 1939. His portrayal of the sadistic and cruel Markoff was fabulous, but I do think Thomas Mitchell deserved to win for Stagecoach.
Trivia: Liked gold mining and writing poetry. Said he only smoked for the movies. Was best man in William Holden’s wedding to Brenda Marshall. Third marriage was to Bela Lugosi’s ex-wife. Had his own TV show in the 1950s.