Mythological Creatures Reexamined: Part 5 – Hippogriff to Dwayyo

Some of the legendary creatures depicted in this series are derived from mythological stories, superstitions, and folklore passed on through generations over centuries and have been well represented in the media or in art. Others are cryptozoological creatures alleged to actually exist in contemporary times though its existence has yet to be documented by the scientific community. However, these creatures can also appear in the former category yet many are usually the stuff of urban legend where the lines of truth and fiction are blurred. In this selection, we’ll see cryptids like Spring-heeled Jack and Owlman from Britain, the Dover Demon, the Squonk, and the Dwayyo from the United States, and the Mongolian Death Worm from the Gobi Desert. As for legendary creatures, we’ll take a look at the Ghoul from the Middle East, the Satyr from Greek Mythology, the Cockatrice, the Hippogriff, and the Catolbepas from Ancient Rome, the Wraith and the Fomorian from Ancient European Folklore, the Noppera-bo from Japanese Mythology, and the Wendigo from Native American legend. So without further adieu, here are more legendary creatures for your pleasure.

 

61. Hippogriff

Though best remembered as a creature from Harry Potter, the Hippogriff was first made by Virgil in his Ecologues though it wouldn't receive its name until the 16th century. So J. K. Rowling didn't make this creature up.

Though best remembered as a creature from Harry Potter, the Hippogriff was first made by Virgil in his Ecologues though it wouldn’t receive its name until the 16th century. So J. K. Rowling didn’t make this creature up.

Type: Hybrid, Divine Bird
From: Roman Mythology (yet, it’s most famously featured in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.)
Features: Head, wings, and claws like an eagle but body like a horse. Well-toned and muscular. Sometimes depicted as having claws like a lion.
Behavior: Faster, stronger, and more intelligent than griffins. Can move as fast as lightning.
Habitat: Egypt, the Middle East, and parts of Europe and Asia
Is It Dangerous?: Not as long as you can treat them with respect. Otherwise, you know what Buckbeak did to Draco Malfoy.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Yes, they can be easily tamed and serve as companions to knights and sorcerers.
How to Get Rid of It: Well, you can behead it or strike it with an air missile. Yet, you probably don’t want to do that, especially if it’s Buckbeak.

 

62. Satyr

Satyrs are best known for being peaceful forest dwelling creatures known for engaging in hedonistic pleasures like music, dance, wine, and sex. In short, they're kind of like the Greek mythological equivalent of hippies. Yet, why is there one in C. S. Lewis Narnia series I have no idea.

Satyrs are best known for being peaceful forest dwelling creatures known for engaging in hedonistic pleasures like music, dance, wine, and sex. In short, they’re kind of like the Greek mythological equivalent of hippies. Yet, why is there one in C. S. Lewis Narnia series I have no idea.

Type: Hybrid, Humanoid
From: Greek Mythology
Features: Human upper body with goat like legs and tail. Usually depicted with brown fur and often as male with horns. Often wear a full beard and have long curly hair. Sometimes seen as old and ugly and sometimes not. At times could be depicted as being well endowed or balding.
Behavior: Associated with pipe playing and play a tail piece during festivals honoring Dionysus in Greek myths. Love wine, music, dance, and any kind of pleasure. Often seen pursuing mountain nymphs and trying to seduce them. Still, they are absolutely fearless and has a deep connection with nature.
Habitat: Deep in woods and mountains.
Is It Dangerous?: Only when drunk and/or horny. Still, will only attack in self-defense so don’t try to get on its bad side.
Can It Be Domesticated?: No, for they are humanoid.
How to Get Rid of It: I’m not sure how for the Greek myths don’t say. Then again, environmental devastation may do it.

 

63. Cockatrice

Sure this may resemble a dragon with a chicken head. Yet, be warned that this creature is capable of killing you by looking at you, touching you, or even breathing on you. Keep away at all times.

Sure this may resemble a dragon with a chicken head. Yet, be warned that this creature is capable of killing you by looking at you, touching you, or even breathing on you. Keep away at all times.

Type: Hybrid, Dragon
From: Roman Mythology
Features: Head, claws, and wings of a rooster. Has reptile’s body and tail. About as tall as a large rooster. Often depicted as a dragon with a rooster’s head. Tends to be confused with a basilisk.
Behavior: Solitary.
Habitat: Europe.
Is It Dangerous?: Oh, yes. Can terrorize people into an extreme state of panic. Can turn people into stone just by looking at them as well as kill just by touching and breathing on others. Powers of petrification are still active after death. Has a deadly poisonous breath.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Absolutely not.
How to Get Rid of It: Have a weasel or crow go after it. Also, trick the beast into seeing its own reflection. It also doesn’t like roosters either.

 

64. Ghoul

Ghouls are basically zombies which are more persistent predators for brains and have paralyzing touch. They're also capable of shape shifting as well as lure people into the desert to devour.

Ghouls are basically zombies which are more persistent predators for brains and have paralyzing touch. They’re also capable of shape shifting as well as lure people into the desert to devour.

Type: Undead, Humanoid
From: Arabian Folklore
Features: Undead and decomposing human body in an emaciated form. Skin is pale and lifeless while eyes and hair seem that they have never seen daylight. Appearances vary though.
Behavior: Despite being seemingly weak and fragile, they’re actually very strong. Have powerful hands and fingers. Capable of regeneration and shape shifting. Tends to steal coins. Travel in groups and nocturnal.
Habitat: Worldwide. Live in the desert or abandoned places.
Is It Dangerous?: Very capable of tearing a normal healthy human apart in mere seconds. Their hands can make an incredibly deadly grip. Usually tend to eat on kiddie corpses and drink blood but they would take a living human on occasion and they especially like fresh brain matter. Has a paralyzing touch and is a super persistent predator. Seriously, they make zombies seem friendly. If you survive being bitten by one, you become one of them.
Can It Be Domesticated?: No way in hell.
How to Get Rid of It: Kill it with a single swipe of the sword. If you miss swinging it twice, it will come back to life twice as powerful. A light can also help as well as using fire, acid, or decapitation.

 

65. Catolbepas

Now the catoblepas won't eat you but this doesn't mean that it's safe to be around it. After all, it eats poison plants so its breath could either kill you or turn you into stone. Still, this one pictured doesn't seem too happy for some reason.

Now the catoblepas won’t eat you but this doesn’t mean that it’s safe to be around it. After all, it eats poison plants so its breath could either kill you or turn you into stone. Still, this one pictured doesn’t seem too happy for some reason.

Type: Hybrid
From: Ancient Roman Folklore
Features: Has large boar’s head, a small pig’s body, with wings. Sometimes described as having a body of a buffalo or bull with iron like scales along its back. May be depicted with horns. Appearances may vary.
Behavior: Doesn’t see much of anything since its head is so big. Solitary.
Habitat: Ethiopia.
Is It Dangerous?: Has toxic breath due to eating poisonous plants and is capable of killing anything around it. When it sets its eyes on anything living, it turns to stone.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Hell no.
How to Get Rid of It: We’re not sure about that one.

 

66. Wraith

I know this is a ring wraith from Lord of the Rings since it's on a horse. Yet, the dementors from Harry Potter also qualify. Still, these dark spirits usually hunt souls for sport and fill the air with hate, sorrow, and doom. Let's just say, it wouldn't be a good idea to invite a wraith to a Halloween Party, despite being terrifying.

I know this is a ring wraith from Lord of the Rings since it’s on a horse. Yet, the dementors from Harry Potter also qualify. Still, these dark spirits usually hunt souls for sport and fill the air with hate, sorrow, and doom. Let’s just say, it wouldn’t be a good idea to invite a wraith to a Halloween Party, despite being terrifying.

Type: Undead, Spirit
From: Ancient European Folklore
Features: Often portrayed as dark and shadow like entities wearing black hooded cloaks. Arms, legs, and faces tend to be skeletal. Faces could be endless black holes in their hoods. Sometimes appear as dark and shapeless shadows. May be depicted on deadly horses.
Behavior: Travel in hordes and nocturnal. Very intelligent and are super persistent. Always fill the air with hate, sorrow, and doom. Can make a room seem lifeless and cold in seconds. The dementors from Harry Potter can qualify as these.
Habitat: Worldwide but mostly in dark forests and caves.
Is It Dangerous?: Oh, my God, yes. These ghostly terrors hunt souls for sport. They are evil to the core draining the life out of anything they touch and leave bodies lifeless without souls. That or the victims become part of their clan. When angry, can unleash powerful waves of energy with their hate and drain entire villages of the will to live and take their souls.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Well, they were hired by Sauron and Azkaban, but you’d have to be morally bankrupt to use these on people.
How to Get Rid of It: Either try to survive until midnight in a place where it can’t get to you or use holy magic. You could also try cutting its head off.

 

67. Fomorian

The Fomorians were considered to be a race of semi-divine spirits in Ancient Ireland, perhaps being the old gods similar to the Greek Titans. Still, they kind of resemble creatures that you'd find at a bar in Mos Eisley. Just saying.

The Fomorians were considered to be a race of semi-divine spirits in Ancient Ireland, perhaps being the old gods similar to the Greek Titans. Still, they kind of resemble creatures that you’d find at a bar in Mos Eisley. Just saying.

Type: Hybrid
From: Celtic Mythology
Features: Large deformed body made up of animal parts. Appearances vary but every way grotesque looking.
Behavior: Travel in groups. Possess magical powers.
Habitat: Ireland.
Is It Dangerous?: Said to have poisonous skin that oozed with deadly sweat, which doomed any person who made contact with one. Known to terrorize the Irish people, destroy armies, and forced them to make child sacrifices.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Absolutely not.
How to Get Rid of It: Driven by Tuatha De Dannan into the sea.

 

68. Noppera-bo

Sure she may be terrifying with no face but this noppera-bo is usually harmless. Yet, that doesn't mean that she's caused an occasional heart attack once in a while.

Sure she may be terrifying with no face but this noppera-bo is usually harmless. Yet, that doesn’t mean that she’s caused an occasional heart attack once in a while.

Type: Spirit, Humanoid
From: Japanese Mythology
Features: Human body without a face. Perhaps impersonating someone familiar to the victim.
Behavior: Solitary.
Habitat: Japan. Usually around graveyards.
Is It Dangerous?: No, these ghosts are absolutely harmless.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Sorry, but they’re humanoid and could scare the shit out of you.
How to Get Rid of It: You can’t. They’re ghosts for God’s sake.

 

69. Spring-heeled Jack

Spring-heeled Jack may wear an outfit similar to Batman but remember he's not known to be associated with good things. In fact, just the opposite. Still, he's one of the better known creatures from Victorian urban legend.

Spring-heeled Jack may wear an outfit similar to Batman but remember he’s not known to be associated with good things. In fact, just the opposite. Still, he’s one of the better known creatures from Victorian urban legend.

Type: Cryptid, Humanoid (may actually be former Cryptid but there were sightings in the Victorian Era. Also, may have inspired Batman in appearance.)
From: 19th century British Folklore
Features: Wears a metal mask to cover his hideous face and breathes blue flames. Has evil glowing eyes and long sharp metal claws. Mask might be part of his face or cover his face after being horribly disfigured with severe burns. Sometimes depicted in a black cape like Batman.
Behavior: Can jump to great heights with extreme speed and ease into surprise attacks or away from authorities. Solitary and nocturnal.
Habitat: England
Is It Dangerous?: Has been reported attacking several young women and men. Said to blow his blue flame in their faces and freeze them with fear. Would later proceed to slash them with his iron claws.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Hell no.
How to Get Rid of It: Sorry, you can’t stop him because he’s always able to escape.

 

70. Wendigo (a. k. a. Windigo or Witiko)

The Wendigo is a very violent creature from Native American legend known to feast on human flesh in snowy forests.  Still, it has been mentioned by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in his 1855 Song of Hiawatha. And it is prevalent in a lot of recent media depictions.

The Wendigo is a very violent creature from Native American legend known to feast on human flesh in snowy forests. Still, it has been mentioned by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in his 1855 Song of Hiawatha. And it is prevalent in a lot of recent media depictions.

Type: Undead, Humanoid, Spirit
From: Native American Folklore
Features: Has a bone body, sharp crooked teeth, and disfigured face. Has very thin skin and sunken eyes. Said to have a heart of ice visibly seen through the chest pumping. Appearances may vary according to depiction.
Behavior: Solitary and very patient hunter. Said to be formerly human but starved and turned to cannibalism. Known to have the ability to control the weather and bring powerful snowstorms.
Habitat: United States and Canada. Lurks in snowy forests.
Is It Dangerous?: Known for silently stalking its human prey in the snowy forests. Also have the power to summon wild beast to aid in its attacks. Very violent.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Absolutely no way in hell.
How to Get Rid of It: Shatter its icicle heart with a silver stake.

 

71. Dover Demon

The Dover Demon is a strange urban legend creature that was reportedly sighted by two teenagers in 1977 in Dover Massachusetts. Of course, these sightings have ceased for a short period so there's not much to go by. Yet, it's still a good idea for a cheap Halloween costume.

The Dover Demon is a strange urban legend creature that was reportedly sighted by two teenagers in 1977 in Dover Massachusetts. Of course, these sightings have ceased for a short period so there’s not much to go by. Yet, it’s still a good idea for a cheap Halloween costume.

Type: Cryptid, Spirit
From: United States
Features: Watermelon shaped head which is disproportionally large for its body. Has illuminated orange eyes, long, thin arms with slender fingers, as well as sand paper like flesh toned skin. Could be bipedal or walk on all fours. Said to have no nose, no mouth, no ears, and no mouth. Also said to be 3ft tall, chalky skin, and made a blood curdling noise.
Behavior: Solitary and nocturnal.
Habitat: Dover, Massachusetts. Lives in forests.
Is It Dangerous?: We’re not totally sure.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Probably not.
How to Get Rid of It: If you’ve seen this, you’d want to take a picture of it. Getting rid of it won’t be in your best interests.

 

72. Mongolian Death Worm

No, that's not an intimidating worm monster from Tatooine but close. It's actually a Mongolian Death Worm which may give Genghis Khan a run for his money. Still, someone in Hollywood really should be pitching a monster movie for this guy.

No, that’s not an intimidating worm monster from Tatooine but close. It’s actually a Mongolian Death Worm which may give Genghis Khan a run for his money. Still, someone in Hollywood really should be pitching a monster movie for this guy.

Type: Cryptid
From: Mongolian Mythology
Features: Enormous slimy red worm with long razor sharp fangs. Body is about 2 -5ft long. Resembles a living piece of intestine riddled with visible veins and gooey slime. That or a giant monster parasite.
Behavior: Solitary. Hibernates most of the year except June and July.
Habitat: The Gobi Desert in Mongolia.
Is It Dangerous?: Oh, yes it is. Humans are its favorite prey. Capable of spitting fatal splashes of venom and electricity (even at a distance). Said to make anything it touches turn yellow and corrode. Can emerge from the sands out of nowhere to attack. Touching it causes an instant and painful death.
Can It Be Domesticated?: No way in hell.
How to Get Rid of It: We’re not sure how at this point. Perhaps drop a bomb on it.

 

73. Squonk

Sure this may seem like an idea pet if you're into that sort of thing. However, the Squonk is known to dissolve into tears and bubbles so to capture it is impossible. Sorry kids. Still, a Pittsburgh based art collective is named after this creature called Squonk Opera.

Sure this may seem like an idea pet if you’re into that sort of thing. However, the Squonk is known to dissolve into tears and bubbles so to capture it is impossible. Sorry kids. Still, a Pittsburgh based performance art collective is named after this creature called Squonk Opera.

Type: Cryptid
From: United States
Features: Has unfitting skin covered in warts and blemishes. Appearances vary.
Behavior: Spends a lot of time weeping and hides in plain sight out of being ashamed for its appearance.
Habitat: The hemlock forests of northern Pennsylvania.
Is It Dangerous?: I haven’t heard anything about it that’s dangerous.
Can It Be Domesticated?: It just dissolves into tears and bubbles when hunters try to capture it. Therefore, impossible.
How to Get Rid of It: It just gets rid of itself by dissolving into tears and bubbles.

 

74. Owlman

Behold, Owlman, a man sized owl that haunts the village of Mawnan in Cornwall, England. Its stare could petrify people with fear for days, sometimes weeks. Still, it's said to be Britain's answer to Mothman in the cryptozoological world.

Behold, Owlman, a man sized owl that haunts the village of Mawnan in Cornwall, England. Its stare could petrify people with fear for days, sometimes weeks. Still, it’s said to be Britain’s answer to Mothman in the cryptozoological world.

Type: Divine Bird, Cryptid
From: British Folklore
Features: Human-sized owl with glowing eyes. Has huge razor sharp talons and a large pointy beak. Sometimes depicted as an owl-man hybrid.
Behavior: Solitary and nocturnal.
Habitat: Cornwall’s village of Mawnan in England. May live in a church tower.
Is It Dangerous?: Its stare is said to leave whoever encounters it petrified with fear sometimes for days or weeks.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Absolutely not.
How to Get Rid of It: We’re not sure how. Missiles?

 

75. Dwayyo (a. k. a. Dewayyo or the Maryland Dogman)

The Dwayyo is an urban legend creature in Maryland best known for almost resembling a close relation to Chewbacca as well as its ongoing struggle with the Snallygaster. Hey, it's not like I made this stuff up here. That's what the legend says.

The Dwayyo is an urban legend creature in Maryland best known for almost resembling a close relation to Chewbacca as well as its ongoing struggle with the Snallygaster. Hey, it’s not like I made this stuff up here. That’s what the legend says.

Type: Cryptid, Humanoid
From: United States
Features: Said to be hairy, have a bushy tail, and is sometimes bipedal. Can be depicted as a werewolf, Bear man, or others. Appearances vary.
Behavior: Solitary and nocturnal. Enemy of the Snallygaster.
Habitat: Between Middletown and Wolfsville in Maryland.
Is It Dangerous?: Has been known to attack humans according to some news reports.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Absolutely not.
How to Get Rid of It: I’m not sure how. Maybe we should just watch it fight with the Snallygaster.

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