Mythological Creatures Reexamined: Part 8 – Melusine to Piasa

While many mythical creatures seem to originate in Western Mythology, especially in legends by the Greeks, there are plenty of monsters all over the world. Of course, while some of them may remind you of some of the more familiar beasts, sometimes they could be seen as different. For instance, the Chinese Jiang Shi is way different from the traditional vampire and zombie. Same goes with the Japanese Ningyo and traditional western mermaids as well as the Adlet with regular werewolves. Nevertheless, in this selection, we’ll look at aquatic creatures like the French Melusine, the Jormungand from Norse Mythology, the Aztec Ahuizotl, the Scottish Nucklelavee, as well as the cryptids like the Ogopogo from Canada and the Mokele-Mbembe from Africa. From Greek Mythology, we’ll see the parents of all monsters named Echidna and Typhon, the Peryton, and the Lamia. And then we have the cryptid Skunk Ape from the Everglades, the Elemental from Paracelsus, the Lich, the English giant Gogmagog, and the Piasa from Native American Legend. So without further adieu, here are some more mythological monstrosities for your pleasure.

 

106. Melusine

Let's just say there's a good reason why Melusine wanted some time by herself on Saturdays. Still, she probably should've told her husband about her lower half before they were married. Would've saved a lot of trouble.

Let’s just say there’s a good reason why Melusine wanted some time by herself on Saturdays. Still, she probably should’ve told her husband about her lower half before they were married. Would’ve saved a lot of trouble.

Type: Hybrid, Water Monster, Humanoid
From: French Folklore
Features: Half woman and half fish or serpent. Could be depicted with tails or wings. Some stories have her as a traditional siren. Considered beautiful from the waist up. Appearances vary.
Behavior: Let’s just say, she greatly values her privacy, especially when it came to bathing on a Saturday. May have been this way as a curse for being taken to Avalon in some stories. Also, hates to be teased about her lower half. Can turn into a dragon and is said to surface every 7 years.
Habitat: Streams and rivers.
Is It Dangerous?: Depends on the legend. In some stories, she’s a siren who calls to lead men to their watery deaths. In others, she’s a stealer of children who also beckons them at night and leads them to drown. In her most famous story, she’s actually pretty nice but she could turn into a dragon if you dare piss her off about what’s below her waist.
Can It Be Domesticated?: She’s part human, so no.
How to Get Rid of It: Well, she did leave her husband when he called her a serpent in front of court after he caught her bathing. Should’ve married the founder of Starbucks. At least she could model for the logo.

 

107. Elemental

Of course, if you take the water elemental out, you get the 1970s R&B and soul music from the other three basic elements of Earth, Wind, & Fire. Of course, I'm sure that group with actual elementals won't go too well though.

Of course, if you take the water elemental out, you get the 1970s R&B and soul music from the other three basic elements of Earth, Wind, & Fire. Of course, I’m sure that group with actual elementals won’t go too well though.

Type: Humanoid, Anthropomorphic Being, Spirit
From: 16th century alchemical writings of Paracelsus
Features: Human like creature of the elements of earth, air, fire, and water. There are four different types like Gnome (earth), Undine (water), Sylph (air), and Salamander (fire).
Behavior: Can summon their element into reality. A Salamander could shoot fire balls. A Gnome can cause earthquakes. An Undine can start tidal waves. Said to be longer lived than man but ceased existence upon death.
Habitat: Worldwide?
Is It Dangerous?: Well, though occasionally described as nice, they are often portrayed as evil or unkind. So make what you will. Also, while they are mischievous and like to play, they tend to cause disasters.
Can It Be Domesticated?: You got to be kidding me.
How to Get Rid of It: I’m not sure how.

 

108. Jormungand

Jormungand is another of Loki's monstrous children that is so large his body forms a circle around the entirety of Midgard. Of course, at Raganarok, he and Thor will kill each other.

Jormungand is another of Loki’s monstrous children that is so large his body forms a circle around the entirety of Midgard. Of course, at Raganarok, he and Thor will kill each other after he gets rid of all life with his poisonous breath first.

Type: Serpent, Sea Monster, Ouroburos
From: Norse Mythology
Features: Enormous snake with huge fangs and a flat tail. Basically is so large that he can circle Midgard and grasp his own tail.
Behavior: Solitary and is always in a bad mood. Spends much of his time biting his own tail until Raganarok.
Habitat: Oceans across the world.
Is It Dangerous?: Yes. His huge fangs could spit deadly venom which and is capable of exhaling poisonous gas that could kill all living creatures. Also could cause natural disasters whenever he pleased.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Hell, no. Besides, he’s Loki’s son. Yes, that Loki.
How to Get Rid of It: Destined to die at Raganarok. He and Thor are said to kill each other. Yes, he kills Thor as well as practically any creature that doesn’t drown.

 

109. Skunk Ape (a. k. a. Swamp Ape)

Now the Skunk Ape is seen as a Bigfoot from Florida which lives in the Everglades. However, it gives off a stench so foul that you wouldn't want to go anywhere near it. Of course, this Indian probably has no sense of smell to be that close.

Now the Skunk Ape is seen as a Bigfoot from Florida which lives in the Everglades. However, it gives off a stench so foul that you wouldn’t want to go anywhere near it. Of course, this Indian probably has no sense of smell to be that close.

Type: Cryptid, Humanoid
From: United States
Features: Large body covered in orange fur with glowing eyes of either red or green. Bipedal. Said to be 8ft tall and 300lbs. Has very long forearms and an unbelievably horrifying stench.
Behavior: Said to roll itself in the bodies of dead animals so humans could stay away from it. Solitary and nocturnal. Probably omnivorous and very strong.
Habitat: The Everglades in Florida.
Is It Dangerous?: Well, it’s smell may make you pass out but that’s about it as far as we know.
Can It Be Domesticated?: I don’t think you’d want to.
How to Get Rid of It: You’d probably just want to take a picture upon seeing it. Yet, you might want to protect your nose.

 

110. Lich

When researching for a Lich, I can't help but remark on how similar this creature is to Lord Voldemort. I mean Voldemort is sort of an undead entity and powerful magician known to commit evil deeds to achieve eternal life. Yet, I'm not sure if Voldemort could command legions of undead though.

When researching for a Lich, I can’t help but remark on how similar this creature is to Lord Voldemort. I mean Voldemort is sort of an undead entity and powerful magician known to commit evil deeds to achieve eternal life. Yet, I’m not sure if Voldemort could command legions of undead though.

Type: Undead, Spirit, Humanoid
From: Various Tales
Features: Skeletal looking and cadaverous. Often portrayed wearing a black cloak and carrying a staff. Sometimes depicted with armor.
Behavior: Extremely clever and capable of shape shifting as well as other magical powers. Can easily control other undead entities and often uses them as soldiers or servants. Very powerful and tends to be immortal out of its own choice. Usually tend to be magicians and wizards who used dark magic to prolong life or live forever.
Habitat: Worldwide.
Is It Dangerous?: Hell, yes. Is extremely powerful and capable of unimaginable evil and destruction. Will trick and empower any opposing human and any other force it encounters. Serves no one and if it joins forces, it’s always to execute one of its own selfish and devious schemes. Never trust one.
Can It Be Domesticated?: No way in hell.
How to Get Rid of It: Does Lord Voldemort qualify? Seriously, he was defeated and much of this entry basically describes him. Yet, it helps to understand how a Lich would get to its present state as known in the Harry Potter books.

 

111. Ogopogo

Known as the "Loch Ness Monster of Canada" the Ogopogo hasn't been as well known outside its native Canada. Still, if you live in North America and can't afford to go to Loch Ness, I'm sure a trip to Lake Okanagan is a suitable alternative.

Known as the “Loch Ness Monster of Canada” the Ogopogo hasn’t been as well known outside its native Canada. Still, if you live in North America and can’t afford to go to Loch Ness, I’m sure a trip to Lake Okanagan is a suitable alternative.

Type: Water Monster, Serpent, Cryptid
From: Native American Legend
Features: Large serpent with big pointy horns and seal like flippers. Said to be between 40-50ft long. Appearances may vary.
Behavior: Solitary.
Habitat: Lake Okanagan in British Columbia in Canada. Said to dwell in an underwater cave.
Is It Dangerous?: Always waiting to feast on whatever crosses its path. The shores of Monster Island are said to have been the display of leftover blood and scattered bones of its victims.
Can It Be Domesticated?: You got to be kidding me.
How to Get Rid of It: Local tribes would through dead fish or cattle to safely cross the lake to appease it. In the 1900s, crossing ferries were said to be armed. Still, even these techniques don’t always work. Nevertheless, you can always take a picture of it and send it to the History Channel or National Geographic.

 

112. Mokele-Mbembe

The Mokele-Mbembe is a cryptid that has inspired many a futile expedition to the African Congo in search for it. Still, this doesn't stop cable TV in the US from trying to film it while braving mosquitoes.

The Mokele-Mbembe is a cryptid that has inspired many a futile expedition to the African Congo in search for it. Still, this doesn’t stop cable TV in the US from trying to film this living dinosaur while braving mosquitoes and hippos.

Type: Water Monster, Cryptid, Living Dinosaur
From: African Folklore
Features: Large body with long neck. Said to be as big as an elephant or 15-30ft long as well as brownish gray. Has a row of short spikes protruding from the back of its neck. Some accounts say it resembles a sauropod while others compare its looks to a rhinoceros or elephant.
Behavior: Solitary and clearly wants to be left alone. Territorial herbivore that is said to appear at sunrise and sunset.
Habitat: The Congo River in Central Africa.
Is It Dangerous?: Well, it won’t eat you but that’s about it. Then again, being an herbivore should give no indication that it’s safe, especially in a continent known for many mean plant eaters that do attack people.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Don’t even think about it.
How to Get Rid of It: You wouldn’t want to get rid of this monster. I’m sure if you encounter it, the folks at National Geographic, Syfy, the Discovery Channel, or the History Channel might want to do a special.

 

113. Gogmagog

While Gogmagog may have been able to wipe away armies with brute force, he wasn't very savvy with battle tactics. Of course, this proved his undoing according to Geoffrey of Monmouth.

While Gogmagog may have been able to wipe away armies with brute force, he wasn’t very savvy with battle tactics. Of course, this proved his undoing according to Geoffrey of Monmouth.

Type: Humanoid
From: English Folklore
Features: Distorted human like body and twice the size like 13ft tall. Has bulging muscles. Wore animal skins with the heads and claws still attached to keep warm.
Behavior: Said to be extremely powerful and the combined strength of 20 men. May have been the son of a demon. Not very battle savvy and used simple weapons.
Habitat: England.
Is It Dangerous?: Well, since his story was written during the Middle Ages where giants were said to be known for terrorizing villages, I would say yes.
Can It Be Domesticated?: No way in hell.
How to Get Rid of It: Thrown off a cliff in a duel by Corineus.

 

114. Echidna

This is how the "Mother of All Monsters" Echidna gets dressed.... for dinner. I'm sure she likes to chomp on a man's strong bicep muscles. Still, it's strange that a cute little monotreme is named after this viper lady.

This is how the “Mother of All Monsters” Echidna gets dressed…. for dinner. I’m sure she likes to chomp on a man’s strong bicep muscles. Still, it’s strange that a cute little monotreme is named after this viper lady.

Type: Hybrid, Humanoid, Serpent
From: Greek Mythology
Features: Has an upper half of a beautiful woman and a lower half of a serpent. Extremely beautiful from the waist up. Sometimes depicted with more than one snake on her lower body or with wings. May have speckled skin.
Behavior: More or less remembered for her destructive children with Typhon and attacking Olympus with her husband but Zeus kept them at bay (she’s not called “Mother of Monsters” for nothing). Yet, her and Typhon seem to have a great relationship. May be part nymph.
Habitat: Greece. Lives in a cave in a hollow rock after Typhon was sealed at Mt. Etna.
Is It Dangerous?: Oh, yes despite having a spiked egg laying mammal from Australia named after her that’s quite cute. Known to entice men with her tantalizing attractiveness while concealing her lower half so she could lure them in the darkness to kill and devour.
Can It Be Domesticated?: No way in hell.
How to Get Rid of It: Murdered by the 100 eyed giant Argus Panoptes in her sleep.

 

115. Ahuizotl

Sure this dog may look pretty cute but keep in mind that it has an appetite for human flesh and tends to drag its victims to a watery death by drowning.

Sure this dog may look pretty cute but keep in mind that it has an appetite for human flesh and tends to drag its victims to a watery death by drowning.

Type: Hybrid, Water Monster
From: Aztec Mythology
Features: Dog and monkey cross with 5 hands. Small with black, shiny, and smooth skin. Has a long tail.
Behavior: Hands are very agile and capable of manipulation like those of a monkey and tail is very powerful.
Habitat: Near Lake Texcoco.
Is It Dangerous?: Hell yes. Has a vicious appetite for human parts and has a particular liking for nails, eyes, and teeth. Leaves leftover corpses completely unscathed except toothless with empty eye sockets and mutilated digits. Waits for a meal by hiding in a watery cave weeping like an abandoned infant. Passerby curious hikers who found themselves a little too close to the water ‘s edge would be snatched by its long powerful tail and additional creepy hand and dragged to a watery death.
Can It Be Domesticated?: You got to be kidding me.
How to Get Rid of It: We’re not sure how.

 

116. Lamia

Now I know Lamia is a monstrous humanoid creature hybrid known to kill children. Yet, somehow I have to feel bad for her since her affair with Zeus led Hera to force her to devour her kids and be turned into this. Seriously, what the fuck, Hera?

Now I know Lamia is a monstrous humanoid creature hybrid known to kill children. Yet, somehow I have to feel bad for her since her affair with Zeus led Hera to force her to devour her kids and be turned into this. Seriously, what the fuck, Hera?

Type: Hybrid, Humanoid
From: Greek Mythology
Features: Has woman’s head, scaly body, four legs, and a tail. In some stories, she has a body of a serpent and has her eyes removed by Zeus. Resembles more of a mermaid in Spanish mythology.
Behavior: Was once a Libyan Queen who had an affair with Zeus that led Hera forcing her to eat any children she had with the king of Mount Olympus. Is unable to close her eyes forever and is eternally haunted by the images of dead children.
Habitat: Libya.
Is It Dangerous?: Not in Spanish mythology in which she’s only angered when you try to steal her golden hair combs. In Greek mythology however, she has been cursed with an insatiable taste for kiddie flesh. In other stories, she just uses her beauty to lure young men to feed on their blood.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Hell no.
How to Get Rid of It: We’re not sure how. Seriously, we’re not sure.

 

117. Nuckelavee

Now a Nuckelavee may seem to have a form of centaur yet it is basically skin less and a creature of sheer terror. His breath could doom a village to starvation and plague. Let's just say you wouldn't want to go near it.

Now a Nuckelavee may seem to have a form of centaur yet it is basically skin less and a creature of sheer terror. His breath could doom a village to starvation and plague. Let’s just say you wouldn’t want to go near it.

Type: Hybrid, Sea Monster, Divine Horse
From: Orkney Folklore
Features: Skinless monster that resembles a centaur or a man on horse. Has an enlarged head and its head, veins, and tendons are all exposed. Has black blood as well as a gaping mouth with a long black tongue and sharp teeth.
Behavior: Has powerful muscles. Solitary.
Habitat: Great Britain. Prefers stale and stagnate waters.
Is It Dangerous?: Absolutely. Has diseased, rancid, and deadly breath that could wilt crops, spread plague, and sicken livestock while on one of his rampages. One of the more malevolent monsters in the Scottish Islands.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Absolutely not.
How to Get Rid of It: Swim in a stream of running water. It’s the only way you could escape him.

 

118. Peryton

Perytons may seem like graceful creatures but keep in mind that they aren't vegetarians and have to kill one human being to appease their Atlantian gods. So to get rid of one, you have to let it kill you.

Perytons may seem like graceful creatures but keep in mind that they aren’t vegetarians and have to kill one human being to appease their Atlantian gods. So to get rid of one, you have to let it kill you.

Type: Hybrid, Divine Bird
From: Greek Mythology
Features: Head of a deer with wings of an eagle. Has sharp teeth and long razor like fangs as well as sharp pointy antlers. May have front legs of a stag but hind legs of a bird.
Behavior: Used to be the inhabitants of Atlantis until it sank into the Atlantic Ocean but they were unable to find their souls again.
Habitat: Mediterranean Sea.
Is It Dangerous?: Well, their main objective pertains to killing a human being to regain favor with the Atlantian gods. Are constantly stalking people to kill them so their souls could be at ease.
Can It Be Domesticated?: No way in hell.
How to Get Rid of It: Well, if you want to get rid of one, you’d have to let it kill you.

 

119. Typhon (a. k. a. Typheus, Tyhaon, or Typhos)

Typhon was one of the fiercest monsters in Greek Mythology. When he and his wife Echidna tried to attack Mount Olympus after the Titans were imprisoned, all the gods were terrified of him but Zeus. Of course, thanks to Zeus, Typhon would be eternally sealed in Mount Etna.

Typhon was one of the fiercest monsters in Greek Mythology. When he and his wife Echidna tried to attack Mount Olympus after the Titans were imprisoned, all the gods were terrified of him but Zeus. Of course, thanks to Zeus, Typhon would be eternally sealed in Mount Etna.

Type: Hybrid, Serpent
From: Greek Mythology
Features: Enormous multi-headed monster with wings and serpent’s body. Once described as having heads of all dragons on his arms and a snake head through his neck though he’s mostly depicted with one human head. Bottom half was said to consist of viper coils which made a hissing noise. Whole body was said to be covered in wings. Appearances vary by description.
Behavior: Best known for fathering a bunch of monstrous kids with Echidna (thus being “Father of All Monsters”) and going to war against Zeus after the latter imprisoned the Titans.
Habitat: Greece. Sealed in a cave at Mount Etna.
Is It Dangerous?: Yes. Oozes with venom from his mouths while lava spews from his eyes. Was so infamous that most of the gods on Mount Olympus fled and Zeus had to take him on all by himself. Also, said to have such an explosive temper that he starts eruptions on Mt. Etna.
Can It Be Domesticated?: You got to be kidding me.
How to Get Rid of It: Sealed in Mount Etna by Zeus after he tried to attack Mount Olympus.

 

120. Piasa

The Piasa is a legendary creature from Mississippian culture with a cliff image that was found by a French priest Father Jacques Marquette in 1673. However, we're not sure whether mythology from it was either ancient or just made up by a guy named John Russell.

The Piasa is a legendary creature from Mississippian culture with a cliff image that was found by a French priest Father Jacques Marquette in 1673. However, we’re not sure whether mythology from it was either ancient or just made up by a guy named John Russell. Still looks pretty cool.

Type: Hybrid, Humanoid, Dragon, Divine Bird
From: Native American Legend
Features: Has a face of an angry bearded man, large antlers from its head, bat like (or bird like) wings, and four legs. Said to have a mouthful of sharp pointy teeth and powerful talons on its hind legs. Also said to be covered in scales and have a scorpion tail. Appearances vary.
Behavior: Very strong that it can easily carry a bison with its huge talons to its home in the high cliffs.
Habitat: Along the Mississippi River in the United States.
Is It Dangerous?: Yes, for once the Illini arrived it seemed to develop a taste for human flesh that the people needed to do something about it.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Absolutely not.
How to Get Rid of It: Well, a chief managed to get his people to trap the monster and shoot it with poison arrows while he acted as bait.

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Mythological Creatures Reexamined: Part 7 – Nymph to Sarimanok

Mythological creatures can come in all shapes and sizes yet in stories they tend to be cast as the villainous monsters that terrorize villages, has a taste for humans and livestock, and what not. Still, it seems everyone likes to see heroes fighting monsters of one sort or another. Nevertheless, a lot of these creatures are dangerous such as dragons, serpents, and sea monsters, even though they may seem real cool. Still, in this selection, we’ll explore monsters like the six headed Scylla and the giant whirlpool Charybdis from Greek Mythology as well as the Nymph whose personality may vary. We’ll also take a look at fiends like the Headless Horseman you remember from “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,” the Succubus, the Jiang Shi from China, the Grim Reaper, the Skeletal Warrior from Ancient Rome, and the Dhampir from the Balkans. On the urban legend angle we’ll see beasts like the British Beast of Bodmin, the Waheela from Canada, and the Lusca from Caribbean Mythology. And last but not least, we’ll examine the Ningyo from Japan which is a Japanese mermaid, the European Fairy, and the Sarimanok from the Philippines which is mostly depicted funky colored chicken. So now without further adieu, I bring you more legendary creatures for your enjoyment.

 

91. Nymph

Nymphs appear a lot in Greek Mythology and have a wide range of personalities. Many of them tend to serve as the companions and assistants to the gods and heroes. Yet, they are a diverse group of beings with a lot of different functions that would take up a whole blog post of its own.

Nymphs appear a lot in Greek Mythology and have a wide range of personalities. Many of them tend to serve as the companions and assistants to the gods and heroes. Yet, they are a diverse group of beings with a lot of different functions that would take up a whole blog post of its own.

Type: Spirit, Humanoid
From: Greek Mythology
Features: Usually are nubile as well as beautiful young maidens and are nature deities. There are several different types like Nereids, Naiads, Dryads, Oreads, Oceanids, and others.
Behavior: Love to dance and sing as well as are allegedly sexually promiscuous, but this doesn’t apply to all of them (there are many legends in which they weren’t as with Daphne). Are immortal but can reproduce and die from unnatural causes (as with Eurydice). Are usually handmaidens or sex partners to many of the gods. Target of satyrs.
Habitat: Any natural setting in Greece.
Is It Dangerous?: Well, they can be if you refuse to have sex with them or honor their patron god as in Orpheus’ case in some legends. Also can turn into other monsters.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Well, they’re humanoid and work for the Greek gods so, no.
How to Get Rid of It: Well, just because they’re technically immortal doesn’t mean you can’t kill them for they can be murdered.

 

92. Ningyo

While western mermaids can be described as having a human upper body and a fish tail, the Ningyo can have a varying amount of human and fish features depending on the story. Sometimes they just resemble a fish with a human face or be seen as hideously ugly or deformed otherworldly nightmares.

While western mermaids can be described as having a human upper body and a fish tail, the Ningyo can have a varying amount of human and fish features depending on the story. Sometimes they just resemble a fish with a human face or be seen as hideously ugly or deformed otherworldly nightmares. Let’s say that the Japanese mermaids don’t fit the traditional stereotype.

Type: Hybrid, Humanoid, Sea Monster
From: Japanese Mythology
Features: Basically they look like mermaids, except their descriptions tend to vary. Some describe it as a giant fish with a human face and a full head of hair. Sometimes depicted with horns or fangs. Sometimes portrayed as ugly or resemble as a human with scaly arms and clawed hands akin to the Creature of the Black Lagoon. At times can be seen as more human but have distorted demonic features, alabaster skin, and voices like flutes or song birds. Tend to portrayed as a Japanese mermaid though.
Behavior: Tend to warn humans about potential disasters and good fortune. Also can shape shift as well as live for a very long time like 800 years. Could cry tears of pearls. Omnivorous.
Habitat: Pacific Ocean and off the Japanese coast.
Is It Dangerous?: Usually helpful creatures but some legends do have them lure people into the ocean to kill them.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Absolutely not since they’re part human.
How to Get Rid of It: Capture on in a net or have it wash ashore without water.

 

93. Charybdis

In the Strait of Messina sailors had to face a tough decision between Scylla and Charybdis, both which would bring harm. Charybdis was known to suck in ships and spit them out. Let's say that Odysseus was lucky to grab onto that fig tree.

In the Strait of Messina sailors had to face a tough decision between Scylla and Charybdis, both which would bring harm. Charybdis was known to suck in ships and spit them out. Let’s say that Odysseus was lucky to grab onto that fig tree.

Type: Hybrid, Sea Monster
From: Greek Mythology
Features: A giant whirlpool or basically a sea monster that creates a giant whirlpool.
Behavior: Solitary. May have been a nymph but was turned into a sea monster for stealing one Hercules’ sheep.
Habitat: The Strait of Messina between Sicily and Italy.
Is It Dangerous?: Yes, she’s a deadly giant whirpool known to swallow waters into the sea and thrust them back 3 times a day. Any ship caught in this devastating whirlpool would be totally screwed. If you can grab onto something like a tree, you may survive.
Can It Be Domesticated?: You got to be kidding me.
How to Get Rid of It: I’m afraid you can’t. However, Odysseus did manage to survive by clinging on a fig tree when his raft was swallowed up.

 

94. Scylla

Opposite of Charybdis was Scylla which was a cave dwelling and six headed sea monster. If you wish to pass her, you'd have to give up six of your sailors. Of course, Odysseus tried to have her mom intervene but lost six sailors anyway.

Opposite of Charybdis was Scylla which was a cave dwelling and six headed sea monster. If you wish to pass her, you’d have to give up six of your sailors. Of course, Odysseus tried to have her mom intervene but lost six sailors anyway. Imagine if that monster worked as a toll booth operator for the Pennsylvania Turnpike. Hey, anything’s better than six men isn’t it?

Type: Hybrid, Sea Monster
From: Greek Mythology
Features: Has six heads with very long necks that stretch from her cave. Depictions of heads vary in appearance. Sometimes portrayed with tentacles.
Behavior: Solitary. May have been a nymph but was turned into a monster over a love affair or something.
Habitat: The Strait of Messina between Italy and Sicily.
Is It Dangerous?: Oh, yes. She was known to devour six sailors with each of her six heads. Odysseus lost six of his sailors this way.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Absolutely not.
How to Get Rid of It: Odysseus didn’t actually do anything but he just asked her mom Crataeis from pouncing on his ship more than once. Yet, she did manage to devour six of his men though.

 

95. Beast of Bodmin (a. k. a. Beast of Bodmin Moor)

The Beast of Bodmin Moor is a little known cryptid from Britain which has been rumored to mutilate livestock. While experts doubt its existence, it didn't stop a big cat skull to turn up (which was found to be a hoax).

The Beast of Bodmin Moor is a little known cryptid from Britain which has been rumored to mutilate livestock. While experts doubt its existence, it didn’t stop a big cat skull to turn up (which was found to be a hoax).

Type: Cryptid, Abnormal Animal
From: Great Britain
Features: A large black panther with red eyes. Sometimes depicted as a dog or a cat.
Behavior: Solitary and active 24/7.
Habitat: The Bodmin area of England.
Is It Dangerous?: Well, it’s been known to attack and mutilate livestock. Might’ve slaughtered 24 people in a jail in 1515. So yes.
Can It Be Domesticated?: No way in hell.
How to Get Rid of It: We’re not sure how.

 

96. Headless Horseman

While best known as the scary ghost that drove out Ichabod Crane from Sleepy Hollow, the Headless Horseman has been a motif in European Folklore since the Middle Ages. Has appeared in the poem "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" as well as in the tales of the Brothers Grimm.

While best known as the scary ghost that drove out Ichabod Crane from Sleepy Hollow, the Headless Horseman has been a motif in European Folklore since the Middle Ages. Has appeared in the poem “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight” as well as in the tales of the Brothers Grimm.

Type: Spirit, Undead
From: Celtic and Germanic Mythology (though most famous in Washington Irving’s “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow”)
Features: Basically a headless ghost man on a horse. May have something to stand in for his head like a gold object or a jack o’lantern.
Behavior: Solitary and nocturnal. Spends a lot of his time searching for his missing head.
Habitat: Europe and the United States (particularly Sleepy Hollow in New York). Tends to live in graveyards.
Is It Dangerous?: Well, according to what happened to Ichabod Crane who was pursued by one on Halloween. Actually we’re not sure whether he died or just skipped town. In Celtic Mythology, it causes a death as soon as it stops riding and calls out a name.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Hell no.
How to Get Rid of It: Try to find his head. Oh, wait, you can’t. Maybe have him chase you through a bridge at a town entrance since he’s incapable of crossing one. Then again, he threw his pumpkin head to Ichabod.

 

97. Succubus

Sure she may look appealing but guys, any sexual intercourse with a succubus could result in sleep paralysis. If a man has sex with a succubus often enough, he could die and suffer eternal damnation as a result. Same goes with women who encounter an incubus which may result in a demon child or Merlin.

Sure she may look appealing but guys, any sexual intercourse with a succubus could result in sleep paralysis. If a man has sex with a succubus often enough, he could die and suffer eternal damnation as a result. Same goes with women who encounter an incubus which may result in a demon child or Merlin.

Type: Spirit, Humanoid
From: Middle Eastern and European Folklore
Features: Sexually appealing human body of a woman and may have demonic features like bat wings. Used to be portrayed being hideously disfigured and having 3 sets of breasts and talon like nails. Descriptions vary from legend and appear most pleasing to their intended victims. Male counterpart is Incubus.
Behavior: They are capable of super speed, strength, and stamina. Can shape shift as well as appear in dreams and are immortal.
Habitat: Worldwide and Hell.
Is It Dangerous?: Oh yes. Feed off of souls of young men in their sleep. Victims are said to feel something sitting on their nether region one night and drained, unable to move, and petrified after experiencing a wonderful erotic dream the night before. Repeated sexual activity with one may result in health deterioration and/or death.
Can It Be Domesticated?: No way in Hell.
How to Get Rid of It: Go to sleep wearing a cross necklace or crucifix. That, or don’t go to sleep at all for a while.

 

98. Jiang Shi (a. k. a. Jiangshi)

The Jiang Shi is basically a Chinese cross between a vampire and a zombie. Like vampires, they're  dressed in aristocratic that is outdated by at least 100 years. Yet, like a zombie it doesn't really have much of personality since it can't speak. Still, wouldn't do well in Michael Jackson's "Thriller" video since it can only move by hopping with its arms outstretched.

The Jiang Shi is basically a Chinese cross between a vampire and a zombie. Like vampires, they’re dressed in aristocratic that is outdated by at least 100 years. Yet, like a zombie it doesn’t really have much of personality since it can’t speak. Still, wouldn’t do well in Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” video since it can only move by hopping with its arms outstretched.

Type: Undead, Humanoid
From: Chinese Mythology
Features: A reanimated corpse with long strong fingernails. Tend to wear very old fashion clothes since they only wake up every hundred years. May have greenish white skin and a long prehensile tongue. Kind of a Chinese version of a vampire or zombie. Appearances vary. Depicted in the fashion of the dynastic Chinese nobility.
Behavior: Moves around with a stiff hopping gait and arms outstretched. Created when the soul refuses to leave a deceased’s body due to improper death, suicide, or just the desire to cause trouble. Have no higher consciousness such as independent thought. Can’t see, speak, or hear so they locate their prey with their sense of smell or breathing detection.
Habitat: China and Japan.
Is It Dangerous?: Yes. Known to hop around and kill the living and absorbing their life essence.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Absolutely not. They’re human, dead, and dangerous.
How to Get Rid of It: Knock it over and it won’t get up. In Japanese legend, if you can hold your breath, you can escape them. You can also ward them off by writing a special spell on thin yellow paper using chicken blood as ink and stick it to its forehead. Another method is throwing rice in their tracks because these creatures can’t pass until they’ve counted every single grain. Mirrors, rooster calls, items made from peach tree wood, Jujube seeds, Azuki beans, Ba gua signs, handbells, axes, brooms, toadstools, and stonemason’s awls are also useful. Same goes for thread stained with black ink, fire, hooves of a black donkey, the I Ching, the Tong Shu, and blood of a black dog.

 

99. Grim Reaper (a. k. a. Angel of Death, Spectre of Death, or Death)

In Western society the Grim Reaper has served as a personification of death. He is known to show up when someone is nearing the last few minutes of life. You may try to get out of it but if you do, it won't be for long. And if you play chess with the Grim Reaper, you'll lose.

In Western society the Grim Reaper has served as a personification of death. He is known to show up when someone is nearing the last few minutes of life. You may try to get out of it but if you do, it won’t be for long. And if you play chess with the Grim Reaper, you’ll lose.

Type: Spirit, Undead, Humanoid
From: 16th Century European Legend
Features: Usually depicted as a skull face wearing a black cloak and hood. Is usually seen carry a scythe or hourglass. Sometimes accompanied by a raven or black crow. Yet, in The Seventh Seal, he resembles a young Max von Sydow. Has hidden wings so he could fly.
Behavior: Very smart second to God and will even beat the best grandmasters in a game of chess. Yet, some stories have him tricked, bribed, or outwitted to retain someone’s life. Can teleport, use telekinesis, and rip out someone’s soul if he or she is condemned to Hell. Could sense living and dead people in his midst. Solitary and active 24/7.
Habitat: Worldwide. Usually hangs out in old folks homes, crime ridden neighborhoods, Third World countries, and hospitals.
Is It Dangerous?: Well, he usually doesn’t show up until it’s your time to die so you can’t really say he’s dangerous. Then again, there are tales in which he could cause the victim’s death.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Absolutely not.
How to Get Rid of It: You can’t. He’s Death so you can’t get rid of or avoid him. Even if you can outwit, trick, or bribe him, he will be back. If he shows up after you, just accept your fate and join him.

 

100. Waheela (a. k. a. Bear Dog)

While the Waheela in this picture may seem happily domesticated by this wolfskin wearing woman in this painting, remember that its home is translated into "The Headless Valley" because of the mysterious decapitations that took place there. Still, it's usually the beast to blame. You don't want to domesticate that, would you?

While the Waheela in this picture may seem happily domesticated by this wolfskin wearing woman in this painting, remember that its home is translated into “The Headless Valley” because of the mysterious decapitations that took place there. Still, it’s usually the beast to blame. You don’t want to domesticate that, would you?

Type: Cryptid, Hybrid
From: Canada
Features: Resembles a cross between a bear and a wolf. Once described as a wolf on steroids with shorter legs. Depictions may vary.
Behavior: Travel in groups of two or three. Said to be capable of supernatural powers and live for over 10,000 years.
Habitat: The Nahanni Valley in the Northwest Territories of Canada.
Is It Dangerous?: It’s habitat is also known as “The Headless Valley” because of the mysterious deaths this creature may have been responsible for resulted in bodies found that had missing heads.
Can It Be Domesticated?: No way in hell.
How to Get Rid of It: We’re not sure how.

 

101. Lusca

No, that's not a sharkoctopus created in some lab experiment but close. It's actually a Lusca from Caribbean Mythology said to live in the blue holes in the Bahamas. Let's say just this monster needs its own franchise if you know what I mean.

No, that’s not a sharkoctopus created in some lab experiment but close. It’s actually a Lusca from Caribbean Mythology said to live in the blue holes in the Bahamas. Let’s say just this monster needs its own franchise if you know what I mean.

Type: Hybrid, Sea Monster, Cryptid
From: Caribbean Folklore
Features: Gigantic and cross between a shark and an octopus. Described as having a shark’s head and huge octopus tentacles. Said to be between 75-200ft. Tales range from them being portrayed as multi-headed monsters, dragon like beasts, evil entities, or some type of extremely large eels.
Behavior: Can change color and blend in to hide their surroundings.
Habitat: Blue holes found in the waters around the Bahamas.
Is It Dangerous?: Known to surge out and attack out of blue holes. Said to have entire ships sunk in such blue holes in giant whirlpools only have the wreckage float back after. Some have never returned. Known to terrorize fishermen and other inhabitants.
Can It Be Domesticated?: You got to be kidding me.
How to Get Rid of It: Have it wash ashore? Torpedoes?

 

102. Fairy

Like nymphs, fairies can come in all shapes and sizes but they're usually depicted small with insect wings as well as be in the form of pretty women. Still, they have appeared in everything in Western literature from Shakespeare, King Arthur, Rudyard Kipling, and Peter Pan.

Like nymphs, fairies can come in all shapes and sizes but they’re usually depicted small with insect wings as well as be in the form of pretty women. Still, they have appeared in everything in Western literature from Shakespeare, King Arthur, Rudyard Kipling, and Peter Pan.

Type: Spirit, Humanoid, Imp
From: Western European Mythology
Features: Human like that’s usually very small and portrayed with insect or butterfly wings. Yet, can be tall, glowing, and angelic. Said to be dead beings, an intelligent species, or demoted angels. Appearances may vary.
Behavior: Have magical powers. May travel in groups or be solitary. At best can be regarded as blessed and holy, eager to seek help from humans in return of kindness with gifts and favors. At worst can be harassing hordes to travelers and lead people astray.
Habitat: Gardens and woodlands.
Is It Dangerous?: Can range from benevolent to malicious. So it greatly depends on the story. At worst, can be known as anything from pranksters to kidnapping children and the elderly.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Once again, depends on the story. Still, even good fairies should be treated with respect.
How to Get Rid of It: I’m not sure if you want to or can.

 

103. Skeletal Warrior

While some skeletons can bring reminders of death and mortality, there are those in undead armies that bring death to people and seem almost indestructible.

While some skeletons can bring reminders of death and mortality, there are those in undead armies that bring death to people and seem almost indestructible.

Type: Undead, Humanoid
From: Ancient Romany Mythology
Features: Weapon wielding humanoid skeleton. Could be armed with daggers, helmets, swords, shields, and spears. Said to be remains of dead heroes and soldiers from previously destroyed armies.
Behavior: Have an arsenal consisting of any weapons by a living soldier of battle from any army that ever existed. Travel in groups. Have supernatural strength and can use magic.
Habitat: Wherever they are called upon by evil magic.
Is It Dangerous?: Have an inhuman strength to conquer all who oppose them. Seen as omens of death.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Only by evil magicians. According to Ancient Roman mythology, they could be bodyguards of the gods.
How to Get Rid of It: I’m not sure how or if they can. Perhaps destroy the person who summoned them.

 

104. Dhampir

Dhampirs are basically children of vampires and humans who don't lead very nice lives. They usually tend to have uneasy tormented childhoods, have no permanent residence, and usually become vampire slayers because it's one of a few good avenues for employment. Also tend to die horribly in some stories.

Dhampirs are basically children of vampires and humans who don’t lead very nice lives. They usually tend to have uneasy tormented childhoods, have no permanent residence, and usually become vampire slayers because it’s one of a few good avenues for employment. Also tend to die horribly in some stories.

Type: Hybrid, Humanoid, Undead
From: Balkan Folklore
Features: Offspring of a human and a vampire. Albanian legends say that they untamed dark or black hair and lack a shadow. Bulgarian Folklore states that they are very dirty from having a soft body, no nails, and bones as well as a deep mark on the back like a tail. They may also have larger than normal ears, eyes, and noses. Sometimes said to have a slippery-jelly like body and only live a short life.
Behavior: Usually nomads who may have rejected their vampire/human blood. Yet, they have a lot of powers associated with vampirism like enhanced senses, psychic powers, and superhuman strength. Many tend to be vampire hunters themselves. May be the only ones to see vampires invisibly. However, they don’t have any vampire weaknesses or watered down.
Habitat: Worldwide.
Is It Dangerous?: Tries not to be, at least to humans. This doesn’t mean they aren’t.
Can It Be Domesticated?: No, they’re actually humans and want to be treated as such. Yet, they could be hired as vampire hunters by villages.
How to Get Rid of It: Though they don’t age after adulthood or die of natural causes, they can be killed. Also, they can be killed with a stake through the heart.

 

105. Sarimanok (a. k. a. Itotoro)

The legendary Sarimanok is a beautiful rainbow colored bird as well as a symbol of the Maranao people of the Philippines. Still, it tends to be depicted as a chicken nonetheless leading some to suspect it as created by someone on psychedelic drugs.

The legendary Sarimanok is a beautiful rainbow colored bird as well as a symbol of the Maranao people of the Philippines. Still, it tends to be depicted as a chicken nonetheless leading some to suspect it as created by someone on psychedelic drugs.

Type: Divine Bird
From: Maranao Mythology (possibly Islamic Legend)
Features: Bird with colorful wings and feathered tail. Sometimes is depicted as a colorful rooster or holding a fish in its beak or talons. Head is decorated with scroll, leaf, and spiral motifs sometimes.
Behavior: Capable of magical powers, shape shifting, and good fortune. May serve as medium to the spirit world via its unseen twin spirit bird Inikadowa.
Habitat: The Mindano Region of the Philippines.
Is It Dangerous?: I’m not so sure but it doesn’t seem to be.
Can It Be Domesticated?: Probably not.
How to Get Rid of It: Since it’s a symbol of the Maranao people of the Philippines that denotes good fortune, I would highly advise against getting rid of this Technicolor chicken.