In These Haunted United States – Part 3: Massachusetts to New Jersey

Now we’re in the middle of my haunted series on the United States. You might notice that many of these haunted places include hotels. Well, there are some reasons why. For one, hotels tend to have long histories with many still being used today. And let’s just say that something which has been around for a very long time is bound to carry some baggage. In the hotel realm, a checkered past might give rise to ghost stories like some maid committing suicide over an affair. Second, hotels tend to but hubs with a lot of people in them whether they be employees, visitors, owners, and what not. So a lot people can lead to a lot of ghost stories. And third, they tend to be places where you see people from different classes, races, and creeds such as the poorer employees as well as the richer patrons and management. And yes, in America, you’re bound to see plenty of employees to be African American, Latino, or immigrants as you would see in the country’s service industry. But such mingling at another time can lead to some tragic consequences. In this section, I bring you a third installment of some of the most haunted American places. These will include a Massachusetts house that was a scene of a notorious murder, mansions in Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, and Missouri, a major college in Montana, the Nebraska State Capitol, a ghost town in Nevada, a cemetery in New Hampshire, and a house in New Jersey that inspired legends. So for your reading pleasure, here are some more haunted places in these United States.

21. Massachusetts

Legend has it that in this Fall River House, Lizzie Borden brutally murdered her father and stepmother in 1892. But she was found not guilty despite what public opinion thought of her. However, if Lizzie did killed her parents, it was most likely out of a family dispute.

Legend has it that in this Fall River House, Lizzie Borden brutally murdered her father and stepmother in 1892. But she was found not guilty despite what public opinion thought of her. However, if Lizzie did killed her parents, it was most likely out of a family dispute.

Most Haunted Place: The Lizzie Borden House in Fall River

History: Built in 1845, it was the 19th century home of Lizzie Borden and her family. This was the site of the axe murders of her father and stepmother in 1892, widely believed to be committed by Lizzie herself despite being found not guilty. However, if she did kill her parents, it would’ve been over a family dispute. Has been sold in 1918 and 1948.

Present Use: Now a bed and breakfast as well as museum.

Sightings: Apparitions and voices of the Borden family members, servants, and pets are said to be experience throughout the house. Ghosts of 2 young children have also been reported.

Anyone Famous?: It’s said that Lizzie Borden herself has been seen in the basement.

Open to Tourists?: Yes.

Other Haunts: Boston Athenaeum, Houghton Mansion, Joshua Ward House, Witch House, USS Salem, Taunton State Hospital, Leicester Quaker Cemetery, Cape Cod Orleans Inn, Waltham Metropolitan State Hospital, Fort Revere, Danvers State Mental Hospital, Lincoln Mill, Cutler Majestic Theater at Emerson College

22. Michigan

Henderson Castle was originally owned by one of the most successful businessmen in Kalamazoo. It's now a bed and breakfast with a restaurant and spa.

Henderson Castle was originally owned by one of the most successful businessmen in Kalamazoo. It’s now a bed and breakfast with a restaurant and spa.

Most Haunted Place: Henderson Castle in Kalamazoo

History: Built in 1895 and originally owned by Mary and Frank Henderson who was one of Kalamazoo’s most successful businessmen as well as owner and president of the Henderson-Ames Uniform Company (which designed uniforms for secret societies, organizations, and the military). However, Frank would die 4 years after construction while his wife died in 1907. The Henderson children sold the place in 1919 and has since passed hands 10 times until the current owners bought it in 2011.

Present Use: Currently a bed and breakfast. It even has a restaurant and spa.

Sightings: Said to be haunted by the original owners and a soldier as well as al little girl and a dog. Many people report being tapped, having radios blare even when unplugged, and seeing apparitions.

Anyone Famous?: Well, Frank Henderson but only in a local capacity.

Open to Tourists?: Yes.

Other Haunts: Big Bay Point Light, Fort Wayne, Holy Family Orphanage, Eloise Asylum, Murphy’s Lamplight Inn, Traverse City State Hospital, Detroit Masonic Temple, Felt Mansion, Michigan Bell Telephone Company in Grand Rapids, River Raisin National Battlefield Park, Pere Cheney, Mackinac Island, Bone Head’s BBQ

23. Minnesota

The Forepaugh Mansion was home to a successful dry goods businessman in St. Paul. However, he's said to have an affair with a maid who later committed suicide. Forepaugh and his family didn't live in there long soon after that.

The Forepaugh Mansion was home to a successful dry goods businessman in St. Paul. However, he’s said to have an affair with a maid who later committed suicide. Forepaugh and his family didn’t live in there long soon after that.

Most Haunted Place: Joseph Forepaugh Mansion in St. Paul

History: Built in 19th century, it was the mansion of entrepreneur Joseph Forepaugh who made his fortune in the dry goods business and was Senior Partner in the J.L. Forepaugh and Company. He lived there with his wife Mary and their two daughters. However, he made the mistake of cheating on his wife with a young maid named Molly. When Mary caught him in bed with Molly, she asked Joseph to end it and he did. Unfortunately, Molly found out she was pregnant and committed suicide by hanging from a window. The Forepaughs sold the place to retired Civil War General Henry Hammond and moved to Europe. However, Forepaugh would later commit suicide in 1892, most likely to escape a financial crash.

Present Use: It’s now an upscale French restaurant with reception/banquet space. It’s also a museum as well.

Sightings: It’s said the Molly’s ghost apparently bangs on walls, causes glasses to explode, and can sometimes be seen.

Anyone Famous?: Customers are said to see a solid form of Joseph Forepaugh himself, apparently pleased with the restoration and renovation efforts of the current owners. He’s also said to act like he owns the place.

Open to Tourists?: Yes.

Other Haunts: Greyhound Bus Museum, Minneapolis City Hall, Palmer House Hotel, Winona State University, Lake Julia Sanitarium, Dead Man’s Trail, Janesville Doll House, Lake View Cemetery, Mantorville Opera House, Washington Street Bridge in Minneapolis, Concordia College, St. Olaf College, Griggs Mansion

24. Mississippi

Cedar Grove Mansion was home to the Kleins who used their home as a hospital during the Battle of Vicksburg when it was attacked by cannon. The family would reside there until 1919.

Cedar Grove Mansion was home to the Kleins who used their home as a hospital during the Battle of Vicksburg when it was attacked by cannon. The family would reside there until 1919.

Most Haunted Place: Cedar Grove Mansion in Vicksburg

History: Built in 1852 and was owned by planter and businessman Joseph Alexander Klein as well as his wife Elizabeth where they’d have 10 children. During the Civil War, they used their home as a Union hospital, particularly during the Battle of Vicksburg. However, it didn’t prevent the mansion from being attacked by cannon nor did Elizabeth’s family ties to General William Tecumseh Sherman. The Klein family would reside there until 1919.

Present Use: Now a bed and breakfast. Said to be among the most elegant in the South.

Sightings: Reported manifestations of the house include house’s original family, various apparitions (including soldiers), laughter, and footsteps.

Anyone Famous?: Well, it’s said the John Klein still keeps an eye on the staff and is apparently not quite trusting of the living’s judgement. His wife is said to be there, too.

Open to Tourists?: Yes.

Other Haunts: Cold Spring Plantation, Kessler Air Force Base, Longfellow Place, Rowan Oak, Mississippi State Capitol, Vicksburg National Military Park, Waverly Plantation, Chapel of the Cross, Corinth Battlefield, Dunleith Plantation, Meridian Grand Opera House, Natchez King’s Tavern, Linden Plantation, Merrehope Plantation, Monmouth Plantation, Springfield Plantation

25. Missouri

In their heyday, the Lemp family dominated the beer business in Missouri until Prohibition. Unfortunately, the family was rocked by tragedy, scandal, and dysfunction with 4 members committing suicide. 3 of them in this house.

In their heyday, the Lemp family dominated the beer business in Missouri until Prohibition. Unfortunately, the family was rocked by tragedy, scandal, and dysfunction with 4 members committing suicide. 3 of them in this St. Louis house.

Most Haunted Place: Lemp Mansion in St. Louis

History: Built in 1868 and home of the Lemp Family, whose brewing company dominated the St. Louis beer market before Prohibition. They lived in this house until 1949. Nevertheless, the family was besieged by tragedy and dysfunction. Four members of the family committed suicide including original owner William Lemp Sr. and 3 of his children.

Present Use: It’s now a restaurant and inn owned by the Pointer family. It’s even a venue for murder mystery dinner theater and Halloween parties.

Sightings: During restoration efforts in the 1970s, it’s been workers reported being harassed by slamming doors, ghostly noise, and experiencing an uncomfortable feeling due to the oppressive atmosphere of the mansion and the “burning sensation” of staring eyes. It’s said a monkey-face boy haunts the attic, looking for love and attention, who is believed to be an illegitimate son of William Lemp Jr. and was said to have Down Syndrome. Not to mention, there have been reports of apparitions of the family members as well.

Anyone Famous?: If you count the Lemp family, then yes, in a local capacity.

Open to Tourists?: Yes.

Other Haunts: Avilla, St. Louis City Museum, Epperson House, Henderson Mansion, Kemper Arena, Missouri State Penitentiary, Pythian Castle, Vaile Mansion, Kansas City Union Station, Knob Noster, Jesse James Farm, Jefferson Barracks and Cemetery, Ravenswood, Missouri Governor’s Mansion, Boonville Thespian Hall

26. Montana

Since its 1893 founding the University of Montana has been the alma mater of an Oscar winning actor, a member of Pearl Jam, a prominent TV star, and this country's first US Congresswoman. However, it's been reported to have an entire lecture attended by ghosts.

Since its 1893 founding the University of Montana has been the alma mater of an Oscar winning actor, a member of Pearl Jam, a prominent TV star, and this country’s first US Congresswoman. However, it’s been reported to have an entire lecture attended by ghosts.

Most Haunted Place: The University of Montana in Missoula

History: Founded in 1893. Said to be a city within a city that has its own post office, medical facilities, police department, banking, restaurants, and ZIP code. Houses the earliest authorized edition of the Lewis and Clark Journals. Mascot is Monte the Grizzly Bear. Notable alumni include Oscar winning actor and Farmer’s Insurance spokesman J. K. Simmons, Pearl Jam’s James Ament, All in the Family’s Carroll O’Connor (best known as Archie Bunker), and US Congresswoman Jeannette Rankin.

Present Use: It’s still used as a public university and is a flagship campus of the UM system.

Sightings: Reports range from the ghost of a girl who committed suicide, a ghost of a dog, and other apparitions and emotional sensations. It’s said at Rankin Hall, there’s an entire lecture attended by ghosts.

Anyone Famous?: Not from what I have heard. However, Rankin Hall is named after famous alum Jeannette Rankin who was the first US Congresswoman.

Open to Tourists?: Well, on a seasonal basis. But they do give haunted tours to the public.

Other Haunts: Bannack, Carroll College, Copper King Mansion, Garnet, Little Bighorn National Battlefield, Montana State Prison Museum, Virginia City, Belton Chalet, Chico Hot Springs, Dumas Brothel, Paris Gibson Square Museum, Reeder’s Alley

27. Nebraska

Besides being home to the country's only unicameral state legislature, the State Capitol of Nebraska is said to be haunted by accident victims who are said to fall from its large tower. On a lighter note, it's been praised for its architecture.

Besides being home to the country’s only unicameral state legislature, the State Capitol of Nebraska is said to be haunted by accident victims who are said to fall from its large tower. On a lighter note, it’s been praised for its architecture.

Most Haunted Place: Nebraska State Capitol in Lincoln

History: Completed in 1932, this is the primary government headquarters of the Nebraska state government. Its style is a mix of Art Deco, Neo-Byzantine, and Gothic Revival. Seriously, Wikipedia’s entry is devoted to the place’s architecture. Several deaths are said to occur there, including 2 people falling to their deaths from the 12th floor and 2 which took place in the central tower stairwell.

Present Use: It’s steal the seat of government in Nebraska.

Sightings: Reports are said to include screams and crying, as well as mist that is seen falling through the stairwell. Ghosts include, an inmate, a workman, a female employee, and a visitor.

Anyone Famous?: Not that I can name off hand.

Open to Tourists?: Yes.

Other Haunts: Brother Sebastian’s Restaurant, Centennial Hall, Hummel Park, Nebraska Wesleyan University, Alliance Theater, Antelope Park, Ball Cemetery, Barnard Park, Blackbird Hill, Bailey House Museum, Devil’s Canyon, Fort Sidney Museum, Hastings College, Logan Creek Bridge, Neville Center for the Performing Arts, Platte County Historical Society and Museum, Seven Sisters Road, Holdrege Speakeasy, Warbonnet Creek Battlefield, Wayne State College

28. Nevada

In its heyday, Virginia City, Nevada was a boom town known for its rich silver deposits. Today it's almost entirely abandoned and relies almost entirely on tourism. And their ghost stories that have sprung up.

In its heyday, Virginia City, Nevada was a boom town known for its rich silver deposits. Today it’s almost entirely abandoned and relies almost entirely on tourism. And their ghost stories that have sprung up.

Most Haunted Place: Virginia City, Nevada

History: Sprang up as a boom town in 1859 due to the discovery of the Comstock Lode, the first major silver deposit discovery in the US. Had over 25,000 residents at its peak in 1862 and was called America’s richest city. One of its famous residents at the time was a young reporter for the local paper named Samuel Clemens. You know him as Mark Twain and he’d later write a novel named Roughing it set in the city. Was also a place of many fires, including a Great Fire in 1875. But as the mines’ output declined after 1878, the city declined. Its most recent population is estimated at 855.

Present Use: Well, it’s mostly a tourist town now, with its historic district drawing 2 million visitors a year.

Sightings: Well, since we’re talking about an entire town, there’s just so many reported haunting incidents to put in this. Some of the ghosts include a woman who killed her own baby before committing suicide, a bunch of dead miners who were killed in fire, a lady waving from a balcony, an Indian killed in saloon fight, a little girl run over by a wagon and her mother, a young woman in lavender, a smoking old man scowling, a schoolteacher, and a woman who died penniless and held séances to contact with her dead husband. Reported incidents include a pieces of metal and rock thrown at visitors, a moving gravestone, and a glowing gravestone.

Anyone Famous?: Not that I can name off hand.

Open to Tourists?: Yes, and supported by tourists, too.

Other Haunts: Abraham Curry House, Goldfield Hotel, Madame Tussaud’s Las Vegas Wax Museum, Zappos Building, Mustang Ranch, La Palazza Mansion, Bonnie Springs Ranch, Mizpah Hotel, Redd Foxx’s Las Vegas House, Nevada Governor’s Mansion, Boulder Dam Hotel, Whiskey Pete’s Hotel and Casino

29. New Hampshire

Pine Hill Cemetery was founded in 1769 on land donated by a man who had to sell his farm. It's said to have family that's been murdered in the 1800s but records don't hold that story up.

Pine Hill Cemetery was founded in 1769 on land donated by a man who had to sell his farm. It’s said to have family that’s been murdered in the 1800s but records don’t hold that story up.

Most Haunted Place: Pine Hill Cemetery in Hollis

History: Founded in 1769 on the land donated by Benjamin Parker Jr. who had to sell his farm. About 300 people are said to be buried there. Many of them in graves that are now currently unmarked.

Present Use: As far as I know, it’s still said to function as a cemetery.

Sightings: It’s said to be the most haunted cemetery of New England. Called “Blood Cemetery” because it’s alleged that the ghost of Abel Blood is said to roam the place as well as various members of his family (they were alleged to be murdered in the 1800s. However, records don’t support this since he and his family died at different times and different places, many of natural causes). A ghost of a little boy was said to try flagging down cars for some reason. Still, reported incidents include ghosts sitting on their own tombstones as well as one tombstone that appears to glow in the dark at night.

Anyone Famous?: No.

Open to Tourists?: Yes, but not at night like most cemeteries. And it’s heavily patrolled by police.

Other Haunts: Gibson Road Cemetery, Isles of Shoals, Mount Washington Hotel, Three Chimneys Inn, Alton Town Hall, Amos J. Blake House Museum, Dover Mills, University of New Hampshire, Toll Hill, Philbrick House, Meetinghouse Green Memorial Park, Nutmeg Inn, MacDowell Colony, Point of Graves Burial Ground, Rockingham Hotel

30. New Jersey

The Seabrook-Wilson House in Port Monmouth is one of the oldest homes in New Jersey and is subject to many legends. However, according to historians, it's more likely that this house had a long but unremarkable existence. And that much of the stories surrounding it might've been made up by a previous curator to save it.

The Seabrook-Wilson House in Port Monmouth is one of the oldest homes in New Jersey and is subject to many legends. However, according to historians, it’s more likely that this house had a long but unremarkable existence. And that much of the stories surrounding it might’ve been made up by a previous curator to save it.

Most Haunted Place: Seabrook-Wilson House in Port Monmouth

History: Built in 1663 by Thomas Whitlock where he lived with his family. The second family, the Seabrooks owned the place for 250 years. And its current structure was built in 1892 by Reverend William V. Wilson and his wife, Martha. From 1910-1970s it was said to operate as a hotel. And up to the 2000s, it served as a historical museum. But since the early 2000s, it’s been closed to the public until 2012.

Present Use: It still functions as a museum but only the first floor is open.

Sightings: Up to 22 ghosts are said to haunt this house including a woman in white, a minister alleged to privately practice Satanism, a bearded sea captain, and a young boy. It’s even alleged to be a spy house and tavern during the American Revolution.

Anyone Famous?: There are legends surrounding that Captain Morgan was known to hide treasure and conduct tortures in the house’s basement that had underground tunnels. And his ghost is said to threaten children visitors in the museum. However, the notion of Captain Morgan’s ghost frequenting a place in New Jersey just doesn’t make sense since he spent most of his life in the Caribbean and died as governor of Jamaica.

Open to Tourists?: Since 2012, only the first floor is opened to the public.

Other Haunts: Shades of Death Road, Burnt Mill Road, Cape May, Red Mill Museum Village, Flemington Union Hotel, Lakehurst Hangar No. 1, Leeds Point, The Devil’s Tree, Burlington County Prison, Proprietary House, Ringwood Manor, Essex County Hospital Center, Clinton Road, The Devil’s Tower in Alpine, Clifton Gates of Hell, Blairsden Mansion, Flanders Hotel

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s