Family Unfriendly Board Games: Part 6 – The Worst Case Scenario Card Game: Work to Dr. Ruth’s Game of Good Sex

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Note: The opening images in this series aren’t of real games by the way. They’re just photoshopped pictures I’ve obtained through various websites. But they kind of emphasize that these games I’m featuring aren’t meant for families for various reasons.

As you might’ve seen, there are plenty of games in this series that were used as promotional items by companies. Of course, these tend to give companies a rather savvy advertising strategy. But as a demonstrated with a few, there could be some unfortunate implications why. With the Camel card game this is very much apparent since Camel is a R. J. Reynolds brand and R. J. Reynolds is a tobacco company. And in some situations such promotional games might come back to bite them such as the BP Offshore Oil Strike game released in the 1970s. And we should all know what happened on the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. Nevertheless, it always seems that there tend to be board games for everything whether for popular media or PR campaigns. And sometimes there are board games for subjects that shouldn’t be. So without further adieu, here is another installment for my series of family unfriendly board games.

51. The Worst Case Scenario Card Game: Work

While The Worst Case Scenario Game may not be the best in history,  the work edition must be the dullest of the lot. Also, it only applies to office work, not other places like retail, restaurant, or blue collar.

While The Worst Case Scenario Game may not be the best in history, the work edition must be the dullest of the lot. Also, it only applies to office work, not other places like retail, restaurant, or blue collar.

Category: Card, Trivia

Players:2

Contents: handbook, cards

Object: Players are asked questions on work-related matters and choose the answer that is most appropriate for them. First player to get 5 questions correct is the winner.

Why they thought it was a good idea: Well they have Worst Case Scenario Card Games for everything else.

Why it’s not: Possibly one of the most boring trivia games ever. Sample questions: “How to Combat Eye Strain from Fluorescent Lights,” “How to Schedule an Interview,” and “How to Survive Light Deprivation in a Windowless Office.”

Available?: Not sure.

52. Post Office

Despite the title of this game, it has basically nothing to do with mail. Rather it's designed for preteens to perform certain stunts with a partner which are childish and wouldn't be done by adults when sober. Probably created by someone on drugs.

Despite the title of this game, it has basically nothing to do with mail. Rather it’s designed for preteens to perform certain stunts with a partner which are childish and wouldn’t be done by adults when sober. Probably created by someone on drugs.

Category: Roll/Spin and Move

Players:2-4

Contents: game board, spinner, player pieces, cards

Object: Said to be played by girls and boys together (not sure why) and a girl is supposed to start the game. When a player lands on game board spaces like First Class, Air Mail or Special Delivery, they are supposed to pick up the card to read aloud which lists a stunt that must be accomplished within a time limit to score points (which are appropriate for kids between 8 and 12) and to score one must complete the stunt first and with a partner. Examples include eating a potato chip at the same time and whistling “Yankee Doodle, or standing back to back to remove jacket to put on oneself without turning around. First player to reach 500 points wins.

Why they thought it was a good idea: I don’t know. Drugs? It was released in 1968.

Why it’s not: To make a long story short, it has nothing to do with mail whatsoever. Also, it’s stupid. Not to mention, if children want to play a game that entails doing crazy stunts, they could just play Truth or Dare. At least that game doesn’t require girls or boys participation together, doesn’t list childish stunts, and doesn’t require doing them with a partner.

Available?: No.

53. The Amanda Knox Game

Now there are some events that should never be made into board games. And this is one of them. For God's sake Amanda Knox was a woman who spent years in Italy for a murder she didn't commit. Should we really have a game like that? Seriously, why?

Now there are some events that should never be made into board games. And this is one of them. For God’s sake Amanda Knox was a woman who spent years in Italy for a murder she didn’t commit. Should we really have a game like that? Seriously, why?

Category: Roleplaying, Press Your Luck, Co-Operative Play, Roll/Spin and Move

Players: 2-4

Contents: game board, hourglass, die, player pawns

Object: Based on the 2007 Amanda Knox case, players take a role of an individual present at the crime scene and pursue variable hidden goals. Players must make choices that may either alter or recreate historical events. Board is a map of the apartment where the murder took place, by the way.

Why they thought it was a good idea: Must’ve been started by someone who raised enough money on Kickstarter. That’s all I can say.

Why it’s not: Well, it’s rather insensitive that anyone would make a board game pertaining to a recent and real life murder case with the victim’s family members being still alive. Now Amanda Knox spent 4 years in an Italian prison accused as well as falsely convicted of killing her roommate (but was found totally innocent due to the fact she was with her boyfriend at the time as well the DNA evidence found was linked to a man). Seriously, it would be like making a board game of the O. J. Simpson case in the 1990s. I mean why does this game exist?

Available?: Not sure

54. Guillotine

Experience the fun of the French Revolution with this card game of beheading aristocrats with the pull of the string. Of course, a card game like this is quite sick if you think about it.

Experience the fun of the French Revolution with this card game of beheading aristocrats with the pull of the string. Of course, a card game like this is quite sick if you think about it.

Category: Card, Humor

Players: 2-5

Contents: small cardboard guillotine display, 50 noble cards, 50 action cards

Object: Players are executioners during the French Revolution trying to behead the least popular nobles. As nobles line up while players take turns killing the ones in front of the line, they can manipulate the line order with certain cards. After 3 days, the player with the highest head count wins.

Why they thought it was a good idea: Perhaps to put the fun in the French Revolution the sickest way possible.

Why it’s not: Uh, the whole game is about killing people. And the French Revolution was known to be a very bloody time in history, especially the Reign of Terror. Seriously, this is pretty sick and twisted for a family game night. That is, unless you’re the Addams Family who digs this sort of thing.

Available?: Not sure.

55. Intrigue

In this game, players do whatever it takes to get ahead even if it means intimidation, bribery, conning, and backstabbing. Guaranteed to test friendships. Not for families or people with thin skin.

In this game, players do whatever it takes to get ahead even if it means intimidation, bribery, conning, and backstabbing. Guaranteed to test friendships. Not for families or people with thin skin.

Category: Card, Negotiation, Auction/Bidding, Area Control/Area Influence

Players:3-5

Contents: 20 palace cards, 30 scholar tiles, fake money, Island of Misfit Scholars

Object: Players represent Renaissance era families engaging in rampant nepotism as well as seek positions for their scholars in the other families’ businesses and to further that pursuit players offer bribes. However, once accepting a bribe, the “bought” player is under absolutely no obligation to honor the highest briber or any other verbal deal.

Why they thought it was a good idea: Not sure why. Educational purposes maybe. But I’m not so sure because the box shows a man wearing an outfit more suited for the 1700s than the Renaissance.

Why it’s not: This is a game in which players get ahead through bribery, bullying, conning, intimidation, and backstabbing. Is said to test friendships and relationships since deals will be broken and feelings will be hurt. Not for people with thin skin or family. And it’s certainly not for kids.

Available?: Yes, and you can buy it online.

56. Kill the Hippies

Though intended as a satire, Kill the Hippies pits them as targets to Christian Fundamentalists. Might be fun but might offend at least one person you know.

Though intended as a satire, Kill the Hippies pits them as targets to Christian Fundamentalists. Might be fun but might offend at least one person you know. Probably don’t risk it.

Category: Religion, Card, Humor, Mature/Adult, Memory, Acting, Singing

Players: 2-6

Contents: 100 cards consisting of 15 Hippies, 15 Events, 40 Relics, 30 Deeds

Object: Players are fundies who use religious or mundane relics to convert or kill the hippies. Conversions are worth more points. But events may sometimes occur that help the hippies. Helps to have a Bible in handy. Said can be played as long as one likes.

Why they thought it was a good idea: Was probably created in 2007 as a satire.

Why it’s not: Well, I don’t have anything against mocking fundies or religion but I’m sure you’ll find at least one person you know who’d be offended by this. Also, tends to stereotype.

Available?: Well, you can look up the rules online at its company website.

57. Beverly Hills 90210 Entangle

A tie-in to the popular teen series in the 1990s, this game works like a very awkward version of Twister. Not sure why the creators thought such a game might appeal to teens. Is actually kind of disturbing if you think about it.

A tie-in to the popular teen series in the 1990s, this game works like a very awkward version of Twister. Not sure why the creators thought such a game might appeal to teens. Is actually kind of disturbing if you think about it.

Category: Roll/Spin and Move

Players: At least 2

Contents: large mat, spinner

Object: Works a lot like Twister except you get to step on a body part of the characters from the hit 1990s TV show than on different colored dots.

Why they thought it was a good idea: Well, it was a tie-in to a popular 1990s TV show which had a huge teen fan base.

Why it’s not: I don’t know about you, but if I’m a fan of some TV show, I usually don’t fantasize about stepping on their body parts. That might go for a show I hate like Ancient Aliens or anything on Fox News. Then again, I wouldn’t want to put any of my body parts on any of the Fox Newscasters (bunch of trashy bastards).

Available?: Hopefully not.

58. Audit: The Tax Game

Now here's a game that's all about rich people trying to avoid paying taxes and not get caught by the IRS. Probably not as fun as it sounds during tax season.

Now here’s a game that’s all about rich people trying to avoid paying taxes and not get caught by the IRS. Probably not as fun as it sounds during tax season.

Category: Roll/Spin and Move

Players: 2-6

Contents: game board, die, player markers, credit tiles, fake money

Object: Based on the yearly encounter with the Internal Revenue Service and the preparations to successfully deal with this confrontation. Players try to convert taxable money to non-taxable by landing on positions containing various tax shelters and credits.

Why they thought it was a good idea: Was this centered on the desire to make doing taxes fun?

Why it’s not: Let’s face it, doing taxes isn’t fun for adults. I doubt if this game would make tax season any fun. Seriously, taxes aren’t a fun subject unless you work for the IRS.

Available?: No.

59. Who’s Having This Baby Anyway?

Now while there are a lot of things about pregnancy which people might find joyful and memorable, doesn't mean there should be a board game on it. Seriously, if you're pregnant, read a book about it and consult your doctor. Your friends will thank you for sparing them all the disgusting stuff.

Now while there are a lot of things about pregnancy which people might find joyful and memorable, doesn’t mean there should be a board game on it. Seriously, if you’re pregnant, read a book about it and consult your doctor. Your friends will thank you for sparing them all the disgusting stuff.

Category: Educational, Humor, Trivia

Players: 2-4

Contents: game board, 180 cards, die

Object: Players start at conception and move through the 40 weeks pregnancy board and when “it’s time” to begin labor. Covers all aspects of pregnancy, labor, and childbirth. First player to dilate 10 centimeters wins.

Why they thought it was a good idea: It’s said to keep an expectant mother informed and not having to read all those boring pregnancy books.

Why it’s not: Let’s just say that learning all the disgusting and traumatizing details of pregnancy and childbirth isn’t a great thing to do with friends or family. This is especially true for anyone on a full stomach.

Available?: Unfortunately, yes.

60. Dr. Ruth’s Game of Good Sex

Now this would've been a fine game if it was meant to be played between 2 people and 2 people only. But this is meant to be played between at least 2 couples during a party. I'm not sure if discussing your sex lives is appropriate in most situations, save maybe a couples retreat or group therapy.

Now this would’ve been a fine game if it was meant to be played between 2 people and 2 people only. But this is meant to be played between at least 2 couples during a party. I’m not sure if discussing your sex lives is appropriate in most situations, save maybe a couples retreat or group therapy.

Category: Mature/Adult, Party, Trivia

Players: 4-8

Contents: game board, cards, die, player pieces

Object: Played with couples who move around the board asking and answering questions about sex in order to enhance their intimacy. Players accumulate Arousal Points as they visit Dr. Ruth’s Sex Clinic, stop to ask Dr. Ruth, as well as discuss questions of sexual awareness.

Why they thought it was a good idea: Well, it’s a tie in to Dr. Ruth for 1985 who was a leading sex guru of the 1980s despite looking like somebody’s Jewish mother.

Why it’s not: Now this is certainly not game I’d recommend to families, including those with adult children. Now I can understand a game about sexual intimacy between one couple, but one that requires at least two? Guess it would make for a very awkward evening, especially with alcohol involved. Seriously, I’m not sure if sex lives should be a topic in casual conversations.

Available?: Hopefully not.

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